Archive | Trade & Industry

B-BBEE included with Covid relief regs

Covid relief & BEE don’t mix, say MPs

When the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) were presenting their 2020/21 performance plan to Parliament and after stating that all Covid19 distress funding would be allocated using B-BBEE guidelines, DTIC’s director general, Lionel October, found himself in a spot during questions.

He was asked directly by DA MP, Timothy Brauteseth, what DTIC would say to employees if children went hungry after application by a small time employer failed on such grounds.

Rules are rules

Although the question could be described as a little unfair, DG October replied tactfully that his department was staffed by civil servants “whose job it was to faithfully implement B-BBEE legislation”.

He said all DTIC incentive programmes were conditionally subject to a B-BBEE level and the private sector was usually most co-operative. DTIC was committed to all transformation processes, he said, but he was sure that the scenario in question would not happen.

In other words, the DG had dived for cover.  Later during further questioning on the subject he remarked that DTIC did not “anticipate exclusions of this kind coming up with any programmes associated with the current crisis”.

Well done

The DA complimented DG October during the same meeting on his personal responses over the past months generally to opposition queries and  on his dedication to trade issues during a difficult period.  DA’s Dave McPherson said the DG was one of the few who responded timeously and in detail to their concerns, whereas a good number DG’s failed, he said, to even acknowledge a parliamentary query.

In general, on future plans, DG October told parliamentarians that any framework for the coming years would be subject to a number of downwards adjustments,  especially on the issue of budgeted projects.

This, October said, was in the light of the forthcoming July cuts in budget appropriations as a response to the Covid-19 pandemic in terms of the R 500bn economic recovery package. (Parliament are to debate the DTIC adjustments in the next week or so)

Summation

DG October outlined the department’s total budget of R 11 bn for the 2020/21 financial year, of which 61% or R 6.8 bn is expected to be transferred to public corporations and private enterprises for incentives programmes. Of the total budget, 19% or R 2.1 bn will be transferred to the departmental entities in terms of agreed projects and targets.  DTI operational expenditure, which comprises mainly of compensation of employees, and goods and services, is 18% or R2 bn of the total budget.

DTIC is working on the basis of global economy shrinking by 3% for 2020 as a result of Covid-19.  This is working on IMF figures which figure that South Africa’s economy will probably  shrink by approx. 6%, he said.    To improve growth prospects domestic interventions included the R 500 bn COVID-19 package. There were also “Master Plans” for the automotive sector, poultry industry and retail – clothing, textiles, leather and footwear industries and others were being developed.

October concluded by describing ten key strategic programmes but again stating that all budgets and targets would have to be reviewed in July based on the progression of the pandemic. Accordingly, at this stage, it is quite clear that government planning and associated major capital spending is “on hold” for the moment

The good, bad and ugly

When asked what measures DTIC was taking to reduce the cost of doing business to create an enabling investment environment, DG October answered by quoting instances such as “how much easier it was to register a company and how better to apply for related benefits such as UIF.”   He promised DTIC would make it easier to register properties and process building permits.

DTIC, he said, was also in discussion with Treasury for additional funding for a tax allowance as “an economic responsive package to assist companies in distress as well as to stimulate investment while retaining existing jobs”.

when asked about Section 121 tax allowance schemes where a budget of R 75m had been provided for support of greenfield or brownfield local investment schemes, this had come to an end October concluded.  This was, he said, because almost all the budget had been used up and the fate of what was left would be the subject of “the diversion of funds and projects  which are “gagged by the advent of Covid 19”., he said

Fielding the questions

Dr Corné Mulder re-expressed the hope that B-BBEE would not be applied in the midst of a pandemic with any future schemes (his main theme for the whole meeting).

Dave McPherson asked about DTI pressure upon the National Credit Regulator (NCR) to invoke Section 11 of the in order to allow credit needed under Covid-19 situations.   October ducked this one and said that the NCR’s office and DTIC were currently studying the matter.

On questions on the need to build value-added exports, he quoted a platinum fuel cell production unit which had recently begun operations in Dube Trade Port SEZ.

Looking outwards

Mathew Cuthbert, (DA’s shadow minister of trade), asked Lionel October why South Africa had failed to sign WTO Global Value Chain agreements (GVCs) in the past.   (GVCs assist in reducing trade barriers, lower costs of transportation, can create additional jobs and assist in economic growth in developing countries – for example motor industry assembly plants). 

October looked somewhat perplexed.   In an inconclusive answer, he said he would check with the WTO Ambassador and reply to Cuthbert later in writing.

 

Cuthbert responded to remark that October had said earlier that support was continuing to be given to  the motor assembly industry and it was in “fair condition”.     He said that his feedback told him that this was not the case, particularly in the Eastern Cape where “some motor plants had gone about 98% inactive due to Covid 19 and that the situation was dire.”

He said that DTIC should note this fact and that the department must give the situation its urgent attention. He said Minister Ebrahim Patel must hear that “DTIC had got this completely wrong”.

The meeting ended abruptly due to timeout, but not before EFF’s Yoliswa Yako said that in her opinion Minister Ebrahim Patel was holding back on information and had not participated with any value to the meeting.

 

 

Posted in Agriculture, BEE, Finance, economic, Labour, Trade & Industry0 Comments

By-passing Parliament at one’s peril

….editorial,  30 May 2020

Regulations mania hits South Africa …..

Winston Churchill, perhaps the greatest political and parliamentary figure of the last century, said that if you make 10,000 regulations you destroy all respect for the law.  Take a look at South Africa where far too many conflicting and nonsensical regulations are espoused on a weekly basis, some of them with only a loose and highly doubtful connection to the law, the Disaster Management Act, under which they are gazetted.

What started with good intent in the rush to halt the spread of Covid 19, ‘flatten the curve’ and buy time to build medical supply lines and PPE reserves, has turned into a regularised pattern of government by dictate.  We are in danger of getting used to the idea of government finding a way around the people’s Parliament just because 400 people can’t gather together in the light of social distancing, in itself another regulation.

This shortcut to governance has to be stopped before it becomes regularised in any way.  In the process of searching for a way to speed up what at times can be a cumbersome system of democratic checks and balances, the country has invented an immensely powerful and what could well be an illegal intervention named, by somebody unknown, as the National Coronavirus Command Council.

Rules in bulk

After only a month of the president’s announcement of the declaration of the national state of disaster, more than 50 sets of Covid-19 related regulations, directives, notices and directions have been published nationwide in its name.    Lawyers and business chambers are struggling to keep up with it all.

The problem now being faced is two-fold.  Firstly, the high-sounding and most unfortunately militarised name of “Command Council” represents an entity not recognised in the Constitution, or anywhere in the statute book.   It is purely an invention of a clique within the governing party as an instrument to administer a law cobbled together in a few months called the Disaster Management Act.

Somehow, without the knowledge of Parliament, a handpicked number cabinet ministers, chosen one has to assume by persons residing at Luthuli House, has granted executive functions and powers to a pick of between 8 and 19 cabinet ministers (the number varies) who meet at undisclosed places and take national decisions.

The same unknown group has ignored some thirty to forty other cabinet ministers for reasons unstated to form this command unit and there we have it, a new grouping administering a whole country by regulation.  It is so important that we do not get used to this alien concept as a substitute for ordinary democracy, whether or not it has a body a scientific expertise advising it or not.

Power point

On the subject of powers, the Constitution is quite clear – all cabinet ministers are accountable “collectively and individually to Parliament”.   But to repeat, this caveat is made nonsense of when a cabinet cabal, including the Deputy President, start making government policy affecting citizens’ rights without even a parliamentary nod.

Granted, that originally there was a need for speed and given the fact that Covid 19 is a disaster of global proportions, it was understandable that hastily convened and rushed virtual parliamentary portfolio committee meetings tried vainly to “debate” the issues that might arise as a result of implementing the Disaster Management Bill.    In fact, they did remarkably well in the circumstances and South Africa became the first country to try and handle parliamentary debate electronically in the light of lockdown.

Law by laptop

Virtual meetings make any meaningful debate nearly impossible at the best of times. They are designed more for briefings than for discussion.  In the understandable rush, the buttons pressing the “ayes” became the norm in the short time allowed. The Disaster Management Act (DMA) is the result and is now history.

Now, the buttons are being pressed by Dr Nkosazana-Zuma, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), the department which the DMA empowered, most assuming that COGTA would be more of a spokesperson for the system to be adopted.

Governance by regs

However, “risk-adjusted strategy regulations” were published in a flash by COGTA in the light of the disaster (not emergency) powers with a statement that read, “The Cabinet minister responsible for cooperative governance and traditional affairs upon the recommendation of the cabinet member responsible for health and in consultation with cabinet, declare which of the following alert levels apply, and the extent to which they apply at a national, provincial, metropolitan or district level.” It all sounded like we had things in hand.

In the UK or Commonwealth countries, this process would have amounted to making Dr Nkosazana-Zuma prime minister and Dr Zweli Mkhize her deputy prime minister.  Nevertheless, Parliament in SA  soon fell outside of the inner circle when it came to oversight. Parliament deals with legislation not regulation.

What sticks to the wall

After a week or so,  it became more than noticeable that many of the regulations just did not link up and appeared randomly unconnected. The cooked chicken problem, no flip flops and absurd choices on who could and could not work.   Looking at it from a parliamentary aspect, to create temporary hospitals and to ban liquor and cigarette sales, and then cancel one factor but not the other, seemed not only a stretch under the same law but also a legal anachronism.

Worse, just the act of banning liquor sales and thus damaging the tourism and hospitality industry possibly forever is unlikely to pass any “justification analysis” constitutionally.    Most of the public comments called for in the form of  business submissions are now accumulating in government offices or parliamentary boxes and certainly unlikely ever be seen by Dr Nkosazana Zuma.   She is known for having no appetite for this sort of thing, as was discovered by the African Union.

LIFO

Now many of the regulations are causing serious “unintended consequences” in application, such as schooling, resulting in a law gone rogue.  A further well publicised example has been where regulations allow religious gatherings whereas most major religions did not call for them, nor will exercise them. Gatherings include funerals for the dead but not a healthy game of bowls for the elderly. Most have no idea of who consulted who on outcomes, representing more muddled thinking by a body which records no minutes and meets in secret.

South Africa has invented a most dangerous mechanism where everybody just relies on the Presidency to eventually “put things right” when the panic is over.  To do this, President Ramaphosa, in the light of a forthcoming ANC conference, will have to dissolve this mechanism somehow and terminate its powers. This politically powerful entity is led by a person who contested with him the position of president and who split the governing party in half doing this.

Its going to be a bumpy ride.

Posted in cabinet, Cabinet,Presidential, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Justice, constitutional, Security,police,defence, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Copyright Bill sits in President’s inbox

…..Copyright Bill at tipping point – yes or no?

30 May 2020 –  Major issues remain at stake with the Copyright Amendment Bill sitting with the Presidency for signature for some thirteen months. The Bill will overhaul the copyright and trademark situation in South Africa, not attended to in the statute book by amending legislation since 1976.

However, the substance of the Bill represents a lot more than tidying up an old piece of legislation but rather it changes the tenets and the whole basis of copyright in South Africa.  It rewrites whole sections of the Act to meet the circumstances of a digital world in music publishing, replay, transfer, copying, music rights and author’s rights, royalties and how they are collected.

It is, of course, all about money, otherwise there would not be so much fuss about the deadlock.

The big stick

Major industries are involved, particularly in the USA as far as the publishing, film and music world are concerned.    The Bill tweaks rules on many copyright and trade mark issues that affect a world governed by international copyright agreements.   The US has always been dominant on trade issue matters on this issue but in this case South Africa’s own vested interests into US markets with SA exports comes into play.

Precedent on copyright matters is a far bigger issue than the authors of the Bill, those who fought for local production and authorship rights over three years, ever imagined.   Looking back on the hearings and submissions made by over forty experts and stakeholder business entities to Parliament in those months, the message comes clearly through as a simple “I told you so”.

Nevertheless, the governing party has so far stood against conforming with US pressure, agreeing with SA lobby groups and calling upon the President to sign in the knowledge that SA is moving outside international trade norms and agreements, particularly the Berne Convention.

Mother goose

Oddly enough, in fighting with South Africa, the US is contrary to World Trade Organization’s (WTO) rules on this issue by not giving special dispensation developing countries, but the US has a record of disagreeing with the WTO on this matter, remaining equally fixed in its views. The “Mexican standoff” is now a major issue in US/SA relationships. When it comes to patents, copyright and protection of unlawful copying of trademarked products, the USA becomes a determined negotiator since trade and marketing innovation and the tenet of copyright protection on a global scale is what US commerce is basically all about.

The new law will involve moving to fair use conditions and clauses similar to US law, but there is great dissension even in the USA on fair use vs fair dealing approaches to copyright to the point of massive law suits involving Google and other internet platforms allowing open access to work that may be subject to copyright.

Blind alleys

SA in the past has followed the more rigid “fair dealing” principles adopted by more established copyright environments such as the UK.    The process of capturing and “re-communicating”  images and text raise multiple copyright issues particularly on the matter of whether providing or using a hyperlink to the original material is tantamount to an infringement of copyright.

committees

parliamentary committees

The hybrid SA version provides for rights to use excerpts on protected works for educational use  – a need for which exists in most developing countries. This inclusion has worried the publishing industry whereby whole works are pirated, duplicated and supplied. The new Bill also proposes extensions of protection for local creators which includes rights to royalties, limitations on unfair contracts, and reversion of all copyright assignments to creators after 25 years.

Turf wars

The Office of the US Trade Representative announced at the end of 2019 a review of South Africa’s eligibility for Generalised System of Preferences (GSP) benefits as a result of SA non-adherence.   The outcome of this still awaited but most local commerce and industry would prefer that SA dodges the heavy artillery and returns the Bill to Parliament for a version less confrontational.

The US administration took to its hardball approach on this specific Bill after it was petitioned by the International Intellectual Property Alliance, a private sector coalition representing large US entertainment companies. This is a powerful lobby in terms of influence with the US administration. Pitted against this, all local performer, artist and local film producers, educationalists and university academics feel differently and want the homegrown version passed by Parliament for signature to proceed into law.  Naturally it looks like a David and Goliath scenario, but the US administration has been through this hoop time and time again all over the world.

AGOA

The US GSP programmes meanwhile give extra tariff reductions to developing countries eliminating duties on 3,500 products when imported from one of 119 designated beneficiary countries and territories, which includes South Africa. The US normally provide a wording which satisfies both parties to proceed but not in the case of the proposed SA Copyright Amendment Bill.

At this stage, the SA Constitution says the President must either assent to and sign the Bill or refer it to the Constitutional Court for a decision on its constitutionality.   If the Constitutional Court decides the Bill is constitutional, the President must sign it. The general feeling is that the President would lose the battle.  The question is…… who blinks first.

The deadlock continues but for those who do not compose music, write songs, publish and print books and earn from publishing and music rights in SA but just want the economy and trade agreements not to be damaged, the wait is painful.  The choice for them is a no brainer.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Home Page Slider, Justice, constitutional, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament goes virtual for lockdown


….20 May 2020…

SA first with virtual e-debate

….At the same time as the venerable British Parliament was tackling what seemed to them a totally invasive idea of a virtual e-Parliament, South Africa was simultaneously tackling the same subject as COVID 19 arrived at the shores of Africa.  Immediately, the issue of the consideration of lockdown conditions arose in SA and the question of how Parliament could work with everybody boarded.

Whilst British parliamentarians dithered on the subject and due to the fact that the UK kept social distancing going for a much longer time before their lockdown came into force, South Africa’s virtual website portal went up in an incredibly short time and was first in the world by a few days.

Maak ‘n plan

In comparison, the British virtual system. which is also now also working, only allows for debate in the House of Commons whilst South Africa, in terms of its Constitution, follows proceedings in both the National Assembly and the NCOP and also at committee level as well, with the current joint meetings providing provincial coverage.

The design of the entrance website is pretty similar to the UK portal, the principle being the same but with a British budget, the UK presentation is a good deal slicker.  All the same, the Daily Telegraph complained after the UK launch that all that the voice links in the meetings sounded like Darth Vadar and it was confusing to know who was speaking.

Many players

The beginner’s look of the SA virtual meetings is understandable in the situation.   One can see in SA technicians are having a daily struggle with people using Skype and Zoom connections for the first time, some of whom have little knowledge of the difference between an app and a hard drive.

Most are trying, knowing it all has to happen and it would be best to learn quickly but a certain number of senior politicians still demand studio facilities and a camera.   We shall no doubt look back in years to come and laugh at these early attempts to live a virtual reality life.

48 hours allowed

In South Africa, where the decision to suspend the SA Parliament was a “precautionary measure” in the light of a forthcoming Cabinet decision on how to deal with the pandemic, Parliament’s presiding officers in the form of chief whips and political parties all agreed beforehand on the 17 March that the remaining two days of parliamentary business would be devoted to urgent legislation only.

As a result of this decision, Budget Papers in the form of the Division of Revenue Bill were hustled to the National Assembly for adoption in order that money could flow to the provinces and local government.   A Cabinet meeting followed and the Speaker of the House, who acts for the President in Parliament, was summonsed for a meeting soon after.

Hard facts

The role of Parliament is indispensable for the country to run.   The Constitution demands that Parliament scrutinise and oversee all Executive actions, processes Bills in the  form of legislation, to provide a forum for public consideration of issues and to facilitate public involvement in its legislative and other processes. Such is inviolate, whatever the conditions facing the country.

Realizing that the only way was virtual meetings to consider matters,  Speaker Thandi Modise issued a statement that Parliament would have to “intensify its technological capabilities for a transition to an “e-Parliament”.   She concluded that as a result, a decision had been taken that “Parliament will be able to resume taking advantage of virtual media technology”.

 Into action

The leave period, or recess, for MPs was duly cancelled and parliamentary staff were assigned permits to stay at work.  They used this time for urgent meetings -to assess how Parliament could best resume its proper function under lockdown regulations and deal with the lacuna (i.e. a situation where there is no applicable law to deal with the matter).

It was agreed by the Speaker that priority had to be given in Parliament to virtual meetings that required oversight on COVID-19 matters, bearing in mind the limited number of meetings that could be held at any one time.  It was also agreed that any virtual meetings would be primarily joint meetings based on the government cluster system, i.e. meetings comprising the various representatives from a number of differing committees affected by one subject.

 Order, order

Chief whips were then tasked to adapt parliamentary rules to meet the new conditions. All this had to be based on the procedures, precedents, practices and conventions, which have been developed over the years, known as parliamentary rules.  This was in respect of not only how NA and NCOP virtual plenary meetings were to be run but how debate was to be conducted committee.

Speaker Thandi Modise then confirmed to all political parties that in the planned virtual meetings, members of parliament would have the same powers, privileges and immunity as they have ordinarily in parliamentary proceedings.  Quorum requirements were to be exactly the same she said, and MPs would be entitled to cast their votes either electronically or by voice.

Public participation and access to virtual proceedings had to be made possible, said Modise, “in a manner that is consistent with a participatory and representative democracy, virtual meetings to be live-streamed wherever possible”.

Global comparisons

Despite time limitations Parliament was indeed able to try and benchmark against some other legislatures who were operating as legislatures whilst their countries were fighting against COVID-19. To the surprise of all, little was found.

The prime constitutional constraint in South Africa’s case was that any virtual meetings had to involve both the sittings of the National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces and these had to be seen to be happening if the public wished to observe proceedings, a factor necessary according to the Bill of Rights.   This was overcome by making most meetings “joint” committee meetings of parallel committees from both Houses.

One and only

In the UK, which has no constitution, a parliamentary virtual meeting concept had been designed and planning was six months into happening.  From a standing start, SA Parliament achieved their deadline in about a fortnight.  Australia and New Zealand are still only thinking of going about it and the USA is still fighting about lockdown itself.

Without fanfare, the parliamentary process under the extraordinary conditions began internally in the Cape Town precinct after a very short training period on 20th April, with access being made to the existing  public parliamentary website on the link www.parliament.gov.za/parliament-tv.

 Time will tell

The whole thing seems to work quite well but obviously glitches occur regularly whilst MPs struggle from time to time to find the mute button and some appear if they have just got out of bed.  Already, however, after an initial learning curve, things are changing and before long it will be the way things happen.

At each meeting, provision is made for the parliamentary secretary to log in those MPs present at a virtual meeting, name them, see them, accept apologies and at point count voting if required from those logged in through the  electronic response system.   Minutes are established later through the audio track recorded in the same manner as before. This is quite some procedure to witness in some of the hallowed chambers where the Speaker once wore a wig.

An MP’s presence in any virtual meeting is established through a secure link sent to their email address which also enables counting to be established for the purposes of establishing a quorum, taking decisions on issues or voting on a matter. Links are established on Facebook, Linked-in, Twitter and Instagram, the photography on Facebook on parliamentary issues being quite stunning.

 7 out of 10

In general, the new parliamentary virtual world established is considered by most quite for such a rush and the process will no doubt tide the country through this terrible period in its history.  This aside from any opinion on how well MPs handle their own inputs and deal with difficult question of switching between one another to pose and answer questions.  What you see is what you get.  The result is not always pretty but it is legal.

One advantage is that with so much happening with lights flashing and buttons to worry about, there is little time for any MP to have a quiet slumber.

Posted in Agriculture, cabinet, Communications, Defence, Energy, Fuel,oil,renewables, Home Page Slider, Justice, constitutional, Police, Public utilities, public works, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Home Affairs white paper appears govt meddling

White Paper re-focuses on immigration, security… 

Report issued to clients April end 2019…..

Gathering a head of steam and running into trouble both at home and abroad, is (former) Minister Siyabonga Cwele’s Draft White Paper on Home Affairs, something that President Ramaphosa clearly attempted to avoid any discussion on before elections.   One senses that the Paper is yet another leftover  from the “nine wasted years”. 

Minister Cwele said his department is at present absorbing the submissions received from all stakeholders and citizens on his draft which was published on 30 January giving 30 days for comment.

Read more….White Paper Home Affairs

Posted in Justice, constitutional, Labour, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Tax Avoidance Bill: NPA and Hawks on illicit flows

Treasury, FIC, Hawks, NPA give Parly update…

report to clients end of April …

It now seems inevitable that the Minister of Finance will be tabling a General Anti Tax-avoidance (GATA) Bill by July 2019 as part of National Treasury’s plan to protect the tax base primarily aimed, as one MP put it, at “knocking profit shifting on the head”.   Changes to the Companies Act are also to be introduced.

A high-powered meeting, chaired jointly by Yunus Carrim of the Standing Committee on Finance and Joan Fubbs of the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry, listened  a few days before Parliament closed in April, to report-backs which came from National Treasury, the Hawks, National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) and others combiningg to stem the flow of illicit funds.

Read more…Tax avoidance Bill

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Finance, economic, Justice, constitutional, Police, Security, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliamentary Overview 12 June 2019….

 

Changing the guard…  

Plenty of note for business has happened legislatively during the parliamentary recess but perhaps none so important as the re-structuring of Cabinet. As a result  there will be a change in the appropriate portfolio committees to reflect any changes and a consequent shift in portfolio responsibility for various Bills held over from the previous Parliament.    In the areas of energy, trade and industry and communications this will be particularly interesting of who gets to be the chairperson in the light of differences emerging within ANC structures.

Parliament will choose its portfolio committee chairpersons for the National Assembly and select committee chairpersons for the National Council of Provinces on 27th June, two days after the State of Nation Address ANC party chairpersons.  These appointments reflect how a government governs on policy and legislation. Through the chairpersons.

Read more..Parliamentary overview 12 June 2019

Posted in Agriculture, cabinet, Cabinet,Presidential, Energy, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Justice, constitutional, Land,Agriculture, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Parliament censures CEF and PetroSA

….PetroSA, CEF and SFF mess gets worse…

Article circulated  5 May 2019…..

Despite the claim by new acting Group CEO, Sakhiwo Makhanya, that the Central Energy Fund (CEF) annual accounts for 2017/8 have “provided sufficient headroom for growth due to cost containment”, the CEF executive team was unable to convince  the parliamentary energy  committee chair, Fikile Majola, (now Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry) that CEF had a viable future in any energy scenario.

Read morePetroSA

Posted in Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Trade & Industry0 Comments

This website is Archival

If you want your publications as they come from Parliament please contact ParlyReportSA directly. All information on this site is posted two weeks after client alert reports sent out.

Upcoming Articles

Draft List: The minimum number of words is invalid - it must be a number

Earlier Editorials

Earlier Stories