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Competition Commission zeroes in on retailing

Minister on new Competition Commission focus…

large retailerThe Competition Commission is to announce the terms of the market enquiry into “parts” of the retail industry within the next few weeks, said Minister of Economic Development, Ebrahim Patel, in his budget vote speech to Parliament.

What “parts” exactly were not clear from his speech, Minister Patel only saying itebrahim patel would involve large supermarket chains, grocery stores and small retail outlets like spaza shops.

At present the Competition Commission has launched a market enquiry into both the private medical industry and liquefied natural gas distribution process and was now in discussion with the construction industry on a similar restitution package as “redress for their collusion and price-fixing.”

Property ownership focus

Unusually, Minister Patel’s speech was short and to the point but he did say on the Competition Commission would be looking into the retailing industry and property ownership area.

He said the inquiry would involve “The structure of the industry including retail outlets in townships, the tenancy arrangements in shopping malls that seem to squeeze smaller players out and the impact of the growth of large retail chains on competition, jobs and small business development.”

Announcement appears in vacuum

large retailer 2Nothing was said on Minister Patel’s plans for the Competition Commission in the budget vote speech from Minister of Small Business, Lindiwe Zulu, nor in Minister of Trade and Industry, Rob Davies’ speech, DTI having been split the Competition Commission but still interested in entrepreneurship and job creation.

Deputy Minister of Economic Development, Madala Masuku, said nothing at all on the subject the Competition Commission in her speech but did advise Parliament that the department had been on a series of provincial business studies over six months on how to create more jobs and build small businesses and better service to the provinces. That possibly is the basis of what is now happening as a result of what they saw.

Small business seems stifled

The structure of small business and the relationship to retail chain outlets, competitive pricing and rentals must have been part of such observations.spazza

Also minister, Lindiwe Sisulu, before being transferred to the post of minister of human settlements had told the select committee on economic development that “SMMEs contributed 57% of South Africa’s GDP and accounted for 56% of employment.  The National Development Plan (NDP) envisaged that 90% of jobs created would be coming from small and medium enterprises.”

Partnerships in retailing and distribution

She told parliamentarians that economies around the world had shown that jobs were not created by large corporations, but by SMMEs.    However, large corporations and big businesses should seek partnerships in South Africa so that they could assist the department in building small and medium enterprises and thus contribute to economic development, she said.

Manufacturing distribution was also an area discussed at length  in government small business workshopsdistribution recently attended by parliamentarians where it was seen that the large retailers have also control of country wide market distribution at retail level, only dealing with areas providing suitable economic return and more sophisticated road and rail infrastructure.

This market inquiry by Minister Patel therefore has an investigative ring to it rather than any direct attack on certain sectors in the retail industry.

Other articles in this category or as background
//parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/competition-commission-turns-lp-gas-market/
//parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/competition-commission-promises-health-care-inquiry/

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DTI does flip flop on BEE codes

B-BBEE codes changed on “management control”…

Rob+DaviesA  lack of understanding of the effect of B-BBEE Codes on business and the industrial environment, despite a workshop on the subject, was demonstrated when the department of trade and industry (DTI) amended its own amendment in a matter of days on the point scoring issue in terms of broad- based employment share ownership schemes.

More emphasis has been placed in the Codes generally on procurement from black business, now referred to as “supplier development”.

As you were…

However, the minister of trade and industry, Dr Rob Davies, confirmed in a statement that the second amendment corrected the changes as far as employment schemes were concerned and any such changes would not be retrospective on deals already done, such earlier deals continuing to reap the same benefits under B-BBEE Code pointing as before.

Control is everything

Minister Davies said that DTI still had a think tank operating on how further to make BEE in generalplan BEE more effective insofar as pressure on business was concerned to effectively ensure that management, control and ownership by black persons was increased.  His task team appointed would report back by the end of the month. He repeated this in his budget vote speech.

DTI completely avoided established government procedure by issuing an “explanatory notice” to a gazetted publication on B-BBEE procedures by announcing a completely new aspect on the rules on B-BBEE award-pointing, in this case termed as “amending guidelines”, thus avoiding the issue of public comment.

Most worrying was the fact that minister Rob Davies failed to make any reference to this in his earlier introduction to DTI’s strategic plan to Parliament a week before, subsequently presented to the portfolio committee on trade and industry by DG Lionel October and then to the select committee on economic affairs in the NCOP.

Forgot the union movement

Just as as business leaders were, so was the trade union movement, many of whose members are part of share employment schemes, options or not, and are therefore touched on the issue of reduced profit and dividends.

As far as not mentioning this in a budget vote speech, which was an excellent opportunity to inform business, there is fine line, say opposition members, between failure to disclose to Parliament and avoiding a contentious disclosure to Parliament that that might compromise a negotiation but in this particular case of changes to B-BBEE, the matter  appears to have only involved some members of cabinet and certainly none of the large spectrum of stakeholders involved. It all came as a big surprise.

The minister has published two further notices on the amended B-BBEE Codes regarding the second phase now implemented. The Chamber of Mines was yet another body caught by complete surprise, thinking that their relationships, in this case the minister of mineral resources, were far better than they actually now seem to be. There seemed to be a vacuum in communications.

DTI has now reported to Parliament on subject

To the rescue...

To the rescue…

DTI, in the form of DG Lionel October, has since reported to Parliament on the subject of the amended B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice and explained that Minister Davies had admitted that DTI had taken the wrong route with all good intention “to take a narrower view on black management control” but now had apologised for the descision, now reversed, on this aspect of the pointing system. All is reversed, retrospectively as well.

A full report is with our clients with further comments by DTI on the Codes and their application as revised “after the event”.     This analysis of DTI’s presentation will be archived to this website in the course of time.

In the meanwhile, we note that there is useful extra-parliamentary political comment on //www.polity.org.za/article/da-geordin-hill-lewis-calls-for-debate-in-parliament-over-elitist-bee-codes-2015-05-08

Other articles in this category or as background on this website
//parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/dti-earns-ire-parliament-bee/
//parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/liquid-fuels-industry-short-transformation/
//parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/one-year-implement-b-bbee-codes/
//parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/b-bbee-codes-of-good-practice-far-onerous/

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Lack of skills hampering broadband rollout

Broadband for SA needs local tech….

computerSchoolThe lack of IT skills in broadband development in government, especially those responsible for implementation of the new broadband policy in SA as well as technicians in the field, has become a major issue of debate in Parliament recently.

The department of telecommunications and postal services (DTPS) has increased it spend in consultancy services by nearly 400% in the last year according to its presentation documents to the relevant parliamentary portfolio committee.

Also, once again the rationale behind the splitting of the department of telecommunications and postal services (DTPS) away from the department of communications (DOC) was queried in Parliament as “not being in line with world trends” causing delays in implementation plans.

DTPS in long terms will benefit

Both these issues were responded to by the responsible minister, Dr Siyabonga Cwele, who was in attendance when DTPS presented their strategic and annual performance plans to the relevant portfolio committee.

Dr Cwele said that he was far happier to leave DOC concentrating on matters surrounding the SABC and migration to digital TV, leaving his department (DTPS) to pursue the objective of uplifting South Africa into the world of broadband.

Broadband will help all

This objective also fitted into the plan to re-model and reassess what was expected from the South African Post Office (SAPO) and for government to decide, like many other countries had done, where postal services fitted in and how to consolidate on the valuable rural outreach of SAPO in respect of other services required by poorer sections of the community.

What was clearly missing during the meeting was, according to parliamentarians, exact timelines for broadband introduction to schools, health services, government departments and state owned utilities, Dr Cwele being quite clear that DTPS had been mandated to ensure that affordable broadband was available.

Staff needed to do the job

Dr Cwele acknowledged, however, that DTPS was greatly under qualified to achieve this due to lack of technical skills and the department did not have enough capacity to deliver on its mandate, as this was a very technical sector of public services. It was too early to commit to timelines but at this stage they had to build the staff complement to do the job, he noted.

He said that DTPS had to bring highly skilled young people into the organisation considering the internet revolution and the growing need for national broadband services. “We need skills not expensive managers”, he added.

Technicians not paper creators

It was explained, in general, broadband refers to telecommunication in which a wide band of frequencies is available to transmit information at greatly increased speed, the installation of which should bring costs down, South Africa having some of the highest communication cost factors in the world.

Ms Rosey Sekese, DG, DTPS, in presenting her strategic plan, said her immediate  priorities were:

• broadband connectivity focused on radio frequency spectrum
• cyber security
• the cost to communicate
• an Information Communication Technology (ICT) policy review
• a national e-strategy
• a turnaround plan for SAPO

The total budget allocation for the Department was R1.4 billion, a reduction from R2 billion in the previous financial year.

Opposition members wanted to know the criteria that DTPS had used to choose Telkom as the leading agency in the rollout of broadband and whether this was fair competition.

Also, they asked why DTPS had emphasised the roll-out of e-governance in the public service to meet NDP targets as first objective. Rather, they said, the focus should have been on business and industry, the ICT sector in the commerce and industry sectors needing this and who played a far greater role in economic development and job creation.

Telkom has to lead in this..

TelkomMinister Cwele responded that the selection of Telkom as the leading agency in the rollout of broadband was as a result of Telkom having the largest terrestrial fibre network and was also based on cost, as this was a state owned entity.

On business and industry needs, he also said DTPS needed to find a way to work with the private sector that could improve economic growth and he, the deputy minister and the DG had been in constant engagement with the private sector as it was realised that this was essential.

The department would also work together with the department of trade and industry and the department of small business development to create incentives for investment in SMMEs, as they realised that many small companies had been marginalised by slow internet services and limited access to the many international IT developments taking place and additional sea cable services.

Creating certainty

He added that he was perfectly aware of the challenges in the finalisation of a spectrum policy to internetcreate a smooth path for the regulators and he was also aware of the need to create certainty in the telecommunications industry. He acknowledged that DTPS was following closely the experiences of the Western Cape and Gauteng broadband rollout plans.

The minister promised that all critical posts within DTPS would be filled within the next three months. However, opposition members continued to draw attention to the question of the general IT skills shortage and said it was yet another “crisis about to happen”.

DA’s Gordon Mackenzie noted “a dramatic increase in outsourced services from R52.5m in 2014 to R230m in 2015” and said this route only added to the high cost of communications in South Africa.

Other articles in this category or as background
Overhaul of broadband policy underway – ParlyReportSA
Parliament gets final dates for digital TV – ParlyReportSA
More state powers for ICASA proposed – ParlyReportSA

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Expropriation Bill has now to be faced

Much of the sting goes out of Expropriation Bill…..

landseizuresThe subject of expropriation, not necessarily of land but any property, has now reached the stage of a considerably watered down third Bill which has now been tabled and whilst there are grumbles from many quarters, it appears that the new Bill has not caused the same furore as its predecessors.

The long awaited Expropriation Bill (B4-2015) came before Parliament in the form for a briefing to the portfolio committee of public works attended by the minister of public works, Thulas Nxesi, the briefing itself remaining very much in the hands of the deputy minister, Jeremy Cronin.

Great emphasis was laid by both ministers on the difference between expropriation as a “public purpose” and expropriation “in the public interest”, a difference they said that was clearly laid out in South Africa’s Constitution.

Public purpose, public interest

nxesiMinister Nxesi in his introduction said if there was a need to put up electricity lines or build a road, it was then for a “public purpose” and he saw that there could be no argument – a statement which was later queried by opposition members.

However, minister Nxesi said, expropriating property for “public interest” had to pass a rigorous rationality test as stipulated in the Constitution but a major problem with all Bills previously tabled was that there was no recourse to the courts and on this issue the cabinet had decided to withdraw them. Jeremy Cronin seemed to come to the rescue with a far more detailed and rational presentation.  

He argued that expropriation was an essential mechanism or tool for any state in any country to acquire property under certain instances but much emphasis had been laid in South Africa on the issue of land and white commercial farmers.

He admitted that whilst “public interest includes the nation’s commitment to land reform” in the Bill before them, a fact emphasised in the preamble to the Bill, the proposed legislation was very much in the nature of a mechanism to deal with expropriation rather than say who it applied to.

Expropriation just a “tool”

croninMinister Cronin added that this was one of many reforms taking place to bring about equitable access to all South Africa’s natural resources and reforms to redress the results of past racial discriminatory laws or practices. Such a preamble existed in much of South Africa’s legislation since 1984.

He said, “The Constitution requires “just and equitable” compensation to be determined by having regard of all circumstances without placing undue weight on any single or particular factor. National, provincial and local government were empowered to expropriate property to varying degrees through several pieces of legislation, he noted.

Deputy minister Cronin tracked the history of the Bill before them stating that the 1975 Expropriation Act was totally unconstitutional as it gave draconian powers to the state and was “wisely” withdrawn. A further 2007 Bill was also removed on these grounds and the current Bill was unable to be processed for Parliament before the 2014 elections.

In line with Constitution

settlement_law_justice_However, he said, the Expropriation Bill B4-2015 seeks to ensure consistency with the Constitution and to provide uniformity of procedure of all expropriations without interfering with the powers granted to the expropriating authorities.

Opposition members claimed that the Bill enlarged upon the definition of “public interest” contained in the Constitution and the Bill could not do this constitutionally. Nor did the Bill talk to in broad terms to the issue of compensation, whether it be a commercial farm or alternative accommodation for a shack dweller.

They argued that the new Bill did not talk to the issue of the interest of a bank in terms of a mortgage and where the bank might stand on such issues. The Bill now tabled, minister Cronin said, detailed the manner in which the expropriating authority had to follow, as well as setting up the process of evaluation and the authority to do this “in a just and administrative way”.  

On mortgages and loans from a bank, he said it was the bank that will be expropriated and not the individual.

Credibility of Bill challenged

masangoDA member Masango contradicted this and said any agreement or loan was between a person and the bank and not the state and the bank and he asked how the Bill could have possibly got through the NEDLAC process.

He also raised the issue of poor people not be able to afford litigation if the process of expropriation was contested. ANC member Madlopha said “whilst the media had been rubbishing the Bill, saying that it targets white commercial farmers”, the Bill in her mind gave the state power to expropriate with only a simple notice to the property owner, a process which seemed to contradict with common law.

Blaming apartheid and more

Minister Cronin responded along the lines that in expropriation, the property clause in the Bill of Rights guided the process. Indeed, argument, he said, will no doubt occur on “just and equitable compensation matters” but this did not remove “the consideration of colonial injustice”.   

It was the Constitution, he said, that insisted that in determining “justice and equitable” compensation it should include the process of “restitution”. Deputy Minister Cronin commented that expropriation did not just affect white commercial farmers and any compensation would consider the amount of bond outstandings. 

He concluded that the new Bill was attempting to shorten the process of any litigation. He added that the NEDLAC findings on the Bill would be supplied to Parliament and suggested that the committee ask Agric-SA to appear before them to obtain their views.

Other articles in this category or as background

Zuma goes for traditional support with expropriation –

ParlyReportSA New approach to land reform – ParlyReportSA

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Pravin tackles COGTA intervention at local level

 COGTA getting somewhere with municipalities…..

pravin gordhan MTBSIt is quite apparent why the seemingly impossible task of integrating local, provincial and national government service has been given to minister Pravin Gordhan of cooperative governance and traditional affairs (COGTA). He seems quite determined that all provinces and municipalities have to deliver on their constitutional mandate.

His department of cooperative governance (DCOG) recently updated Parliament on the current situation, led by some opening remarks by the minister himself.   He went straight to the nub of the issue by stating that section 139 of the Constitution provided for intervention by the relevant provincial executive if a municipality could not or did not fulfil an executive obligation.

First steps

Whilst the Local Government Reform Act, passed in 2014, has helped considerably by refining local electoral areas nationally down to 137, whilst 95 municipal districts have been designated in most cases to correspond with electoral areas. Thus, more representative structures have been established although some suspected at the time this was an election ploy.

Stabilisation of local government was the key, said minister Pravin to parliamentarians, and the process of “Back to Basics”, one of the 16 SIP strategic items on the list of the National Development Plan, was the basis of the department’s 2015/6 annual performance plan. This to ensure municipalities performed in their dealings with local government at the coal face.

Minister Pravin said, “Local government plays a key role in determining whether people live with dignity and whether they are able to access economic opportunities, consequently contributing to the overall development of the country”.    Part of COGTA’s mandate, he said, was to understand and support the development of intergovernmental relations in all three tiers of government.

New Bill to make third tier accountable

vusi madonaselaVusi Madonsela, DG of DCOGTA, advised that they were “aiming to build accountability for performance in local government systems by setting and enforcing clear performance standards by March 2019. To this end a new Intergovernmental Monitoring, Support and Intervention (IMSI) Bill would be processed through Parliament.

The performance of municipal public accounts committees (MPAC’s) therefore in all “dysfunctional municipalities as well as municipalities with adverse and disclaimer opinions would be monitored and enforced”, he said.

Changing attitudes to debt

Madonsela also said, “The culture of payment for services would be encouraged nationally with campaigns” and part of DOCG’s task was to improve the ability of at least 60 municipalities to collect outstanding debt. He named other targets such as to strengthen anti-corruption measures by 2019 and to have achieved a full local government anti corruption tribunal systems working.

He also said DCOG would start with 12 districts to develop integrated development plans and eight cities and towns would also be supported and monitored in developing long term strategies and proper spatial development programmes.

Skills always the problem

Opposition members called on COGTA for better performance by local government training SETAs. Many institutions were conducting training programmes for councillors but in the process had found that many councillors literally have no skills or formal education. Madonsela responded by saying there were now regulations being passed to weed out unqualified persons and those with false CVs.

Minister Pravin agreed that some of the factors that led to dysfunctional local government structures included political instability and problems with service delivery and institutional management inability.  Councillors were nominated and appointed by their political parties, he said, and “perhaps it should be a conversation amongst MPs on how councillors should be appointed.”

Back to “Back to Basics”

The net result at the moment, said minister Gordhan, that one in three municipalities, according to a study conducted nationwide, were failing and the success of the “Back to Basics Programme” would now depend on inter-government transfers to bring in skills and changing the employment criteria to economic, tax and financial viability experience.

He concluded that his department was getting tough where municipalities had broken the law and some of the answers may lie in strengthening district municipalities with specialists and merging some municipalities.   Another option was to abolish local municipalities completely and in their stead, start again with district management areas but he did not elaborate on this.
Other articles in this category or as background
Municipal free basic services slow – ParlyReportSA
Local government skills totally lacking – ParlyReport
Electricity connections not making targets – ParlyReportSA

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South Africa remains without rail plan

 Feature article….

Minister Peters fails on rail policy…

dipou Peters2In a written reply to Parliament on the whereabouts of the promised Green Paper on rail policy, transport minister Dipuo Peters told her questioners that such a document which has the intention of outlining South Africa’s rail policy was to be presented to cabinet in November. GCIS statements for cabinet meetings for November and the final cabinet statement in December 2014 made no reference to any such submission having been made – alternatively, the minister might have failed to have it put on the agenda. The country therefore went into Christmas recess once again without an established government policy on both freight and passenger rail transport matters, worrying both industrialists, investors and, not the least, built environment planners.

Just talking together

A draft Green Paper was first submitted to cabinet a year ago but cabinet instructed that more consultation on the proposals was necessary, particularly interchange between the transport and public enterprises departments. The portfolio committee on transport stated that policy on freight rail upgrading and infrastructure development was unclear, plans for commuter and long-distance passenger services confused and no clear picture had emerged on Transnet’s promised policy of structural re-organisation. Subsequent to this, the department set up a national rail policy steering committee to oversee the consultation process and introduce the required changes to policy. It has also divested itself of a number of non-core assets but no clear picture has emerged in statements on the promised policy of giving direction on the privatisation of branch lines.

Since time began…

According to the minister at the time, cabinet’s concerns had also involved the adoption of a standard gauge, private sector participation and economic regulation.  Subsequently, DoT indicated that standard gauge has been selected as the most suitable gauge for the South African rail network and as a result a final revised Green Paper was tabled before the steering committee in October 2014. Nothing has emerged. In the absence of any agreed policy, particularly to meet the proposed idea of rail freight re-assuming its dominant role over road transport in the light of the deteriorating national road picture, a number of developments have indeed taken place with regard to the purchase of diesel and electric train stock, signal systems upgrades and station re-building and passenger coach rolling stock manufacture. Nevertheless, no clear picture has emerged on the road ahead with regard to the freight/road picture, branch line privatisation, commencement dates for full long distance passenger services nor satisfactory plans and targets expressed on domestic commuter rail services.

All said before

Jeremy Cronin, when deputy transport minister, told Parliament in April 2011 that by establishing a local manufacturing base for the new rolling stock, benefits would ensue by creating a substantial number of local jobs. He added that as a result of the redevelopment of rail engineering capacity, skills that have been lost over decades of underinvestment in the local rail engineering industry would be recovered. The then deputy minister also said, “We are currently (2011) in the Green Paper phase with the primary objective of preparing the way for effective stake holder engagement. We are poised to reverse the decline in our critical rail sector that began in the mid-1970s and gathered pace in the late 1980’s.” In April 2015 therefore the country will be the fourth year of waiting for South Africa to outline its rail policy, “a system critically in decline” according to minister Cronin.

Recent update from Maties

A few months ago, a most important paper on rail transport, now in the in the hands of DoT, was published and out into the public domain by Dr Jan Havenga, director: centre for supply chain management, department of logistics, Stellenbosch University, who led a team of transport logistics experts to complete this erudite and informed report. The report is entitled “South Africa’s freight rail reform: a demand-driven perspective” and opens with a definition of government’s responsibilities in rail transport matters. “The role of the government is, primarily, to facilitate the development of a long-term logistics strategy that optimally equilibrates demand and supply through ‘anticipation’ of the market character.” “The definition of a national network of road and rail infrastructure and their intermodal connections will flow from this, presupposing neutrality across modes by taking full account of all relevant social, environmental, economic and land-use factors.” “This ensures that the mix of transport modes reflects their intrinsic efficiency, rather than government policies and regulations that favour one mode over another. The strategy is subsequently enabled by a clearly defined freight policy, a single funding regime for the national network and, lastly, the establishment of appropriate regulatory framework.”

Volume of freight critical

The report notes that “the American Trucking Association (2013) forecasts that intermodal rail will continue to be the fastest-growing freight mode in the next decade. Only the very busiest railway networks, which can exploit the density potential of volume growth, are likely to generate sufficiently high financial returns to attract substantial risk capital in long-term railway infrastructure.” “The Association of American Railroads as well in 2013 also highlights the impact of density on efficiency, revenue and, ultimately, the ability to reinvest.”

Lacking in market intelligence

Dr Havenga says, “The failure of South Africa’s freight railway to capture this market is attributable to a lack of policy direction regarding the role of the two modes (road and rail) in the surface freight transport industry and according to the Development Bank of Southern Africa, caused by the absence of sufficient market intelligence to inform policy.” He goes on to confirm that “one of the key requirements for an efficient national freight transport system is better national coordination based on market-driven approaches.”

Pressing need

“To avoid the ad hoc policy responses of the previous century, which led to sub-optimisation, increasing complexity and decreasing end-user quality, the pressing reform issue for South Africa, therefore, is agreement on the design of an optimal freight logistics network based on a market-driven long-term strategy that holistically addresses the country’s surface freight transport requirements.” Dr. Havenga’s final comment in the report, only a few weeks old, states that South Africa’s freight task is expected to treble over the next 30 years, with further concentration on the long-distance corridors. He points out that the country desperately needs a profit-driven market related core rail network to serve industry and manufacturing, as well as a developmental-driven branch line network to serve rural development. Other articles in this category or as background //parlyreportsa.co.za/transport/minister-comments-taxis-e-tolls-road-rail/ //parlyreportsa.co.za/finance-economic/prasa-gets-its-rail-commuter-plan-started/ //parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/transnet-says-freight-rail-operations-coming-right/ //parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/rail-is-departments-main-focus-in-year-ahead/

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SA needs 3 languages not 13, CSIR says

New minimal language policy proposed by CSIR

signpostThe Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) says that 77% of South Africans can understand each other in three of the main languages. They have, as a result, proposed that a language policy which recommends English, isiZulu and Sepedi as official languages, be adopted. A draft new language policy has been published in the government gazette for public comment which minimalizes ten of South Africa’s current official languages.

The proposal, however, makes it clear that it also recommends that a policy should be adopted for use of information in additional languages in areas where there is “a regional footprint” and “as far as is practical and reasonable” to respond to requests and communications sent in languages other than the official three.

Sepedi

The organisation says the selection of its three official languages was based on “maximum reach through the principle of mutually intelligible languages”. Sepedi is one of many dialects of the Sotho people, known as Northern Sotho or Sesotho sa Leboa, from whence the homeland name of Lebowa was drawn, and is mostly spoken in the Northern Province of South Africa.     Around  3.7 million people in South Africa use it as their home language, it is reported, and Sepedi is the most common language spoken in the heart of the industrial South Africa, which also has largest residential area.

English

Meanwhile, English is the most common language in schoolbooks. It also the most common “lingua franca” of  trading partners in North America, the Australasias, India, and to a great extent in Africa and Europe, all of which are major trading partners of South Africa. All government correspondence in South Africa has now switched to English as first choice, as does business and commerce by default, which fact is probably related to the fact that this is first choice of the JSE and the IT industry worldwide.

Zulu

IsiZulu, also known as Zulu, is understood by people from the Cape to Zimbabwe and reported to be understood by some 10 million persons.   Zulus are part of the Nguni group of people, taking their name from the chief who founded the royal line in the 16th century.   King Shaka raised the tribe to prominence in the early 19th century, from whom the current dynasty is founded. Over 95% of those who speak isiZulu live in South Africa, meaning that 24% of the population can speak this language, dwarfing other languages except English.

Zulu is the most widely spoken home language in South Africa, rated as understood by 24% of the population, with about 10 million speakers – the vast majority of whom live in South Africa.

Not included

Notable is the fact that both Afrikaans (the language of the political base prior to 1994 and the cause of outbreaks of violence when the language was named as first choice for schools throughout South Africa) and Xhosa (the language of the political base after 1994), are not included.

Neither is Tswana mentioned, one of current eleven official languages in South Africa, which is spoken by a larger number of people actually living in South Africa and not in Botswana, the home of the language. Other articles in this category or as background //parlyreportsa.co.za/trade-industry/nema-waste-ask-parliamentarians/

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Competition Commission turns to LP gas market

Focus may be on LP gas allocations….

LP gasThe Competition Commission has announced that it will conduct a market inquiry into the state of competition in the LP gas sector.    Public comment is invited from those in the liquified gas petroleum (LPG) sector and the Commission has said that such an inquiry is being initiated because it has reason to believe that there may be features of the sector that prevent, distort or restrict competition.

In its announcement the Commission specifically draws attention to the fact there are six refineries in the country, namely – Sapref, Sasol Synfuels, PetroSA Synfuels, Natref, Enref and Chevref.

Of these, the Commission says, “Only two allocate a certain proportion of their total LPG supply to wholesalers, which may have an impact on competitive dynamics in the downstream wholesale market.”

Value chain additions

The Commission’s inquiries will also extend, they say, to these LPG wholesalers who act as middlemen, or brokers as referred to by the petroleum and gas industry, who “play” the market with allocations from manufacturers.

“Due to the shortages in LPG supply, these firms may have an impact on competitive dynamics at the wholesale level of the market. This impact will be explored during the market inquiry,” the announcement said.

Public participation

The Commission concluded that it would hold public hearings and hoped that “business enterprises along the LPG value chain, other related business enterprises, end-users, government departments, public entities, regulatory authorities, industry associations and any other stakeholders” would assist with their inquiry.

Other articles in this category or as background

  • //parlyreportsa.co.za//communications/gas-act-changes-closer-to-implementation/
  • //parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/doe-talks-biofuels-and-biomass/
  • //parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/competition-commission-promises-health-care-inquiry/

Posted in Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

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