Tag Archive | Tseliso Maqubela

Competition Commission gets to know LPG market

 DOE holds off on LPG regulatory changes…

Sent to clients 25 Oct….In a briefing to the Portfolio Committee on Energy on the report by the Competition Commission (CC) into the Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) sector, acting Director General of the Department of Energy (DOE), Tseliso Maqubela, has again told Parliament that the long-standing LPG supply shortages are likely to continue for the present moment until new import infrastructure facilities come on line.

He was responding to the conclusions reached by the CC but reminded parliamentarians at the outset of the meeting that the Commission’s report was not an investigation into anti-competitive behaviour on the part of suppliers but an inquiry, the first ever conducted by the CC, into factors surrounding LPG market conditions.

Terms of reference

In their general comments, the Commissioner observed that the inquiry commenced August 2014 on the basis that as there were concerns that structural features in the market made it difficult for new entrants and the high switching costs for LPG gas distributors mitigated against change in the immediate future.

They worked on the basis that there are five major refineries operating in South Africa, these being ENREF in Durban, (Engen);

refinery

engen durban refinery

SAPREF in Durban, (Shell and BP); Sasol at Secunda; PetroSA at Mossel Bay; and CHEVREF in Cape Town (Chevron). There are four wholesalers, namely Afrox, Oryx, Easigas and Totalgaz.

Wholesalers different

As far the wholesalers are concerned, in the light of all being foreign controlled, CC also observed that transformation was poor, but this was not an issue on their task list, they said. They had assumed therefore that BEE legislation was difficult to enforce and that the issue had been reported to the Department of Economic Development, the portfolio committee was told.

Price regulation at the refineries and at retail level is supposedly determined by factors meant to protect consumers, the CC said, but their inquiry report noted no such regulations specifically at wholesale level. This fact was stated as being of concern to the CC in the light of known “massive profits in the LPG wholesaling sector”.

Structures

Commissioner Bonakele said, “We started the inquiry because of the worrying structures of the market but in benchmarking our market structures with other countries and we found LPG in SA was not only unusually expensive but was indeed in short supply. Why? When it is so badly needed, was the question, he said

The CC established from the industry that about 15% of LPG supplied is used by householders and the balance is for industrial use.   In general, they noted that there were regulatory gaps also in the refining industry but regulatory requirements were over-burdening they felt and contained many conflicts and anomalies.

The CC had also reported that the maximum refinery gate price (MRGP) to wholesalers and the maximum retail price (MRP) to consumers were not regulated sufficiently and far too infrequently by DOE.

Contentious

There needed to be one entity only regulating the entire industry from import to sale by small warehousing/retailers, they said. The CC suggested in their report that the regulatory body handling all aspects of licensing should be NERSA .

As far as gas cylinders were concerned, Commissioner Bonakele noted in their report that there are numerous problems but their criticism was that the system currently used was not designed to assist the small entrant. The “hybrid” system that had evolved seemed to work but there was a “one price for all” approach.

DOE replies

In response, DG Maqubela confirmed that the inquiry had been conducted with the full co-operation of DOE into an industry beset with supply and distribution problems, issues that were only likely to change when there were “adequate import and storage facilities which allowed for the import of economic parcels of LPG supplied to the SA marketplace.”

When asked why local refineries could not “up” their supply of LPG to meet demand, DG Maqubela explained that only 5% of every barrel of oil refined by the industry into petroleum products could be extracted in the form of LPG. Therefore, the increase in LPG gas supplied would be totally disproportionate to South Africa’s petrol and diesel requirements.

Going bigger

Tseliso Maqubela, previously DG of DOE’s Petroleum Products division, told the Committee that two import terminal facilities have recently been commissioned in Saldanha and two more are to be built, one at Coega (2019) and one at Richards Bay (2021). These facilities were geared to the importation of LPG on a large scale.

He said, in answer to questions on legislation on fuel supplies, that DOE were unlikely to carry out any amendments in the immediate future to the Petroleum Pipelines Act, since the whole industry was in flux with developments “down the road”.
It would be better to completely re-write the Act, he said, when the new factors were ready to be instituted.

Rules

On the regulatory environment, DG Maqubela pointed out that for a new refinery investor it would take at least four years to get through paper work through from design approval to when the first spade hit the soil. This had to change. The integration of the requirements of the Department of Environmental Affairs, Transnet, the Transnet Port Authority, DTI, Department of Labour, Cabinet and NERSA and associated interested entities into one process was essential, he said.

On licencing, whilst DOE would prefer it was not NERSA, since they should maintain their independence, in principle the DOE, Maqubela said, supported the view that all should start considering the de-regulation of LPG pricing. He agreed that DOE had to shortly prepare a paper in on gas cylinder pricing and deposits which reflected more possibilities for new starters.

MPs had had many questions to ask on the complicated issues surrounding the supply, manufacture, deposit arrangements, safety and application of cylinders. In the process of this discussion, it emerged, once again, that LPG was not the core business of the refinery industry and what was supplied was mainly for industrial use. The much smaller amount for domestic use met in the main by imported supplies for which coastal storage was underway over a five-year period.

Refining

DG Maqubela noted that on Long Term Agreements (LTAs) between refineries and suppliers, DOE in principle agreed with the Commission that LTAs between refiners and wholesalers could be reduced from 25 years to 10 years, to accommodate small players. Again, he said, this would take some time to be addressed, as was also an existing suggestion of a preferential access of 10% for smaller players.

All in all, DG Maqubela seemed to be saying that whilst many of the CC recommendations were valid, nobody should put “the cart before the horse” with too much implementation of major change in the LPG industry before current storage and supply projects were completed.

However, the current cylinder exchange practice must now be studied by DOE and answers found, Tseliso Maqubela re-confirmed.
Previous articles on category subject
Overall energy strategy still not there – ParlyReportSA
Gas undoubtedly on energy back burner – ParlyReportSA
Competition Commission turns to LP gas market – ParlyReportSA

Posted in BEE, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Strategic fuel stock supply has problems

Foggy picture on fuel supplies…

Ageing refineries and failure to finalise financial planning with National Treasury on levies for strategic fuel stocks held in much-needed fuel storage facilities, are part of the problem faced by planners in the fuel industry and government, according to recent parliamentary meetings.

A confused picture emerged from a recent portfolio committee on energy during a meeting between Thembisile Majolacommittee and the Department of Energy (DOE) on behalf of the Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF).

Deputy Minister of Energy, Thembisile Majola, was present for the entire meeting as a participant in the debate, following the presentation on the strategic fuel stocks position by both DOE’s Deputy Director-General, Tseliso Maqubela, and Muzi Mkhize, Chief Director, Hydrocarbons Policy, at DOE.

CEO missing

In fact, not only was the outcome of the meeting unclear but occurred as an unscheduled event until the day in question.    It was also advised that that nobody in DOE knew the whereabouts of the SFF’s CEO, whose office had been found locked, whereabouts of the CEO himself unknown. He was suspected of being on the lookout for a new post, an apologetic member of SFF said.

Neither was the chairperson of SFF present or the main elected board, there being only one of six SFF board members at the meeting. The portfolio chairperson, Fikile Majola, confirmed that there had been major misunderstandings with parliamentary invitations but that did not explain the apparent disinterest by the SFF board itself in reporting to Parliament. The presentations were therefore purely by the Ministry and senior officials of the DOE.

Parliamentarians were told by DOE that strategic fuel stocks were defined as both crude oil and refined products and held by government and/or oil companies to cater for catastrophes or severe fuel supply disruptions.

The price of failure

Products to be kept as strategic stock included diesel, petrol, jet fuel and liquid petroleum gas (LPG).   As far back as 2006 it had been estimated that a “no stock” fuel crisis situation could result in a loss to GDP in South Africa of R1bn a day. This fact caused the Deputy Minister to remark that such a situation in 2015 “would make the current Eskom crisis seem like a walk in the park”.

Muzi Mkhize of DOE said strategic stocks would be released only upon declaration of a state of emergency by the Minister of Energy and were like an insurance policy. The SFF was responsible for the procurement, maintenance and management of strategic stocks held by government and oil companies likewise were responsible for the strategic stocks they held according to arrangements with the state.

The cost of storage

With regard to the financing of strategic stocks, a draft policy document was still being debated with National Treasury on the basis of a suggested levy of six cents per litre on petrol, diesel and jet fuel to finance procurement of stocks and the construction of storage facilities for refined products with operational expenses.

Tesliso MaqubelaTseliso Maqubela of DoE said the management by DOE of liquid fuels in the country was split into two divisions, policy and planning under one branch of  DoE and implementation, after approval by Cabinet, as another division. In that sense all members were present at the portfolio committee briefing, Maqubela assured parliamentarians, including Dr. Chris Cooper of Central Energy Fund under whom SFF used to fall and who was particularly acquainted with all issues. Present also was the CFO of SFF and the Chief Operations Officer.

Less in the cupboard

DDG Maqubela explained that it was originally required that South Africa keep 90 days of net imports but on an analysis of the current situation, it was proposed that the country keep a total of 60 days of strategic stocks and oil companies would be obligated to keep 14 days of refined products defined as strategic.

Africa now included

South Africa was a net importer of crude oil and refined petroleum products, he said, and currently over 50% of the country’s imported crude oil was from Middle Eastern countries whilst before it nearly all came from the Middle East. However, the country also now received 12% of its crude oil from Angola and 31% from Nigeria, which had changed the picture particularly as far as lead times and transportation were concerned.

Maqubela said there was no crisis in strategic stocks, “although there were emerging risks”. He reassured members, saying that on a day-to-day basis, he personally interacted with all the companies in the industry and there was certainly no crisis but the country did not have sufficient storage capacity for LPG.  This had to be resolved quickly and this was an immediate problem, he said.

“If the Chevron refinery went down for example, as it recently did, there would be more serious problemschevron tank in supplying the Western Cape with LPG. Therefore there needed to be an alternative for Chevron, which was why the DoE supported the granting of any foreign group such as Burgan Cape with a terminal licences for the construction of an import terminal and who had satisfactory BEE partnerships. The country could not rely on one facility for any products in any one area, he said.

Oil companies to keep refined product

The other issue, Maqubela said, was that the country was experiencing a lot of unplanned refinery shutdowns, primarily because of their age and the country needed a new refinery. The National Development Plan (NDP) stated that by 2017 a decision needed to be taken on refining, he remarked.

When one of the refineries at the coast had a problem, the country ran into “challenges” and one of the proposals which would be made at policy division level was that the strategic stocks policy needed to ensure that oil companies kept enough buffer stock at their own cost. The DoE believed, he said, given recent experiences that the country needed storage facilities to be built in key cities across the country, particularly in places such as Kimberley and East London.

chevron2Generated cash flows were used to maintain the infrastructure of keeping stocks and to fund all SFF’s operational expenditure. In 2014, the entity had generated R197 million from leasing its tanks for crude oil. Excess funds were transferred into cash reserves. The SFF received no allocation from government. In real terms, the R2.6bn revenue generated by the SFF in 1995 was more than ten times higher than the R198m revenue generated in 2015. SFF was a non-profit Section 21 company.

SFF’s operating costs between 2013 and 2015 had therefore been below budget. In the 2014/15 financial year, SFF’s revenue had been around R198m, as stated — a significant increase from the R93m in 2013/14.

In reserve

Mfano Nkutha, Chief Operations Officer, SFF, said SFF had two storage facilities at Saldanha and Milnerton, both in the Western Cape. Saldanha currently had six underground tanks holding 7.5m barrels each. Milnerton had 39 smaller tanks, holding 200 000 barrels above ground. There were no strategic stocks at the facilities. The SFF had an asset base where it accumulated interest on cash reserves and leased out storage space to crude oil trading companies.

Some of the new locations under consideration were Island View (Durban), Richards Bay port, East London, Cape Town port and Jameson-Park precinct. However, the basic matters still remained which were the finalisation of stock level requirements; some sort of agreement on funding and levies with National Treasury and feasibility studies for any proposed storage sites.

Southern African implications

In answer to the many questions from MPs, Maquebela said that in the broader context of energymapafrica&sa supplies, indeed the strategic fuel stocks policy framework had yet to be finalised but “all the time things were constantly changing in the global space and within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. These changes needed to be included in the policy framework”, he said.

“Botswana had been building huge storage tanks since 2010 as well and other private sector investments were in Coega and in Richards Bay. These had changed the scenario for the strategic stock framework.”      The multi-product pipeline had changed much, DDG Maqubela said, and historically disadvantaged South Africans (HDSAs) now operated in the fuel storage and fuel industry space but a policy was needed to look into a more integrated approach.

No one has shut shop.

Answering more questions, he said, “There needed to be a seamless release of stocks when the situation arose”. He commented on media reports and said that no refinery had been closed, and those which were currently not operating were on maintenance shutdowns. Chevron had not been closed — they were on a planned maintenance shutdown, he said, presumably referring to the verbal spat revealed in Parliament between Chevron, Burgan and DOE over the new Burgan terminal.

Every year, DDG Maquebela said, the DoE received a schedule of planned shutdowns from the oil companies, because shutdowns were required by law. The DoE’s role was to ensure that there were no overlapping shutdowns. The problem arose when the refineries did not stick to their schedules because of unforeseen circumstances, primarily those relating to the ageing infrastructure. Another problem which the country needed to explore was that the availability and reliability of rotating maintenance crews.

Overview of supplies

He said Chevron was currently operating at 30% capacity and Shell and BP had been experiencing some difficulties. Engen had recently undergone a planned maintenance shutdown, but it had come back on line satisfactorily, while Sasol Secunda was still dealing with a planned maintenance shutdown. PetroSA was operating at 50% capacity.

PetroSA logoIn answer to MPs questions on what had happened to DOE’s Coega refinery plan, Project Mthombo, Maquebela of DOE ducked the question by saying the NDP indicated that a decision needed to have been taken by 2017.   He added the DoE was not waiting until 2017 to make a decision, however. The building of the Mthombo refinery, which had been stopped, was being “reconfigured but there were some challenges in this regard.”

Priorities order of the day

Deputy Minister Majola said of the delay on the part of National Treasury was the splitting of the Department of Energy from environmental affairs and the fact that “electricity had become the main issue and Eskom’s challenges had taken priority in the energy space.”

She maintained much so many of the “challenges in DOE policy were concentrated under one branch it was therefore not humanly possible to manage all the work.” This was something which was impeding the progress of the DoE regarding policy, she said. There was also a misalignment between those who developed policy and those who implemented policy on a day-to-day basis. The DoE needed time to make a re-assessment of itself.
Other articles in this category or as background
Chevron loses with Nersa on oil storage – ParlyReportSA
Fuel price controlled by seasonal US supply – ParlyReportSA
PetroSA has high hopes with the Chinese – ParlyReportSA
SA aware of over-dependence on Middle East, says DOE – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Medupi is key to short term energy crisis

Eskom bogged down with Medupi …

medupiActing director general of the department of energy (DoE), Tseliso Maqubela, told Parliament before it went into short recess that once Eskom’s new Medupi power station starts supplying the grid the country would have “turned the corner”.

“It is well known we are challenged on electricity”, he said, adding that the fresh view is being taken on the independent system marketer’s operators (ISMO) system which would contribute to recovery in the medium term through the addition of independent power producers (IPPs).

DG of energy policy, planning and clean energy, Ompi Aphane, in his presentation told parliamentarians that, as per the State of Nation Address (SONA), “vigorous attention is now being given to the establishment of the operator’s office to implement independent power supplies.

Financial  certainty, they say

On the subject of infrastructure build generally in the electricity sector, financial certainty was now being restored in the energy industry, Maqubela said, with the result that R120m in energy investment is now planned, “some of which has already come in and projects started.”

The overall plan was to divide power supply between Eskom and IPPs on a 70-30 basis through the national grid by 2020, decisions on refining and gas replacing diesel also being necessary in the short term in terms of a revised energy mix to meet future demand.

Other immediate focus areas for DoE were to increase access to electricity; increase “the momentum” of the installation of solar units; finalise the integrated energy plan; address maintenance and refurbishment programmes; “strengthen” the liquid fuels industry and facilitate decision taken on the nuclear programme.

Interface problems

A major issue being tackled was the in the area of household connections, according to the DoE presentation. Dr Wolsey Barnard, in charge of energy projects and programmes, explained that whilst Eskom was often bringing power to an area, the municipal backbone installations were either not ready or municipal skills were lacking.  DoE had recognised the problem and was busy trying to bridge this gap, he said, with skills training or by working on temporary permissions from municipalities with Eskom assistance.

However, Dr Barnard said it was encouraging that whereas the position ten years ago could have been described as hopeless, the situation was now specific and targeted to small areas, in most cases the most difficult remaining.

At the moment, 1,5m additional households will be connected by 2019 but as this is still insufficient to meet the target of universal electrification by 2025, additional funds are now being allocated by the state and plans made.

Barnard calls for co-operation

In order to achieve this, it was essential, Dr Barnard said, that the modalities regarding national, provincial and local government powers be revised on the ability for Eskom to assist in view of the lack of skills and the handling of appropriation funding.

He called for urgent attention to the fact that power installation funding by DoE to municipalities should be “ring fenced” and accounted for. This area had to be focused upon urgently, he noted.

He said that too many times Eskom had supplied power to an area only to be told by a municipality that there were no funds for distribution boxes or no skilled persons available to connect lines.  Dr Barnard said he was aware that the economic planning department were “in the picture” and legislation was planned despite the constitutional barriers but again he wanted to emphasise that this issue had to be resolved urgently.

EFF members asked if there were plans to specifically assist the unemployed with electricity connections and wanted a list of all power cuts to the different areas and the reasons for these.

Priorities from both sides

ANC member Ms Makwbele-Mashele asked the DG that with all the emphasis on “greening”, the high cost of gearing industry to meet new emissions and pollutants standards and the recently introduced air quality regulations, whether in his opinion these issues were hindering the country’ energy and industrial development.  The ANC also asked, as the fuel price seemed to be “out of our hands”, whether Sasol could increase production locally.

The DA wanted more detail on the exact steps at present underway to increase co-generation of energy to solve the immediate energy crisis.   This was in the light of the fact that the ISMO process had initially failed simply because DoE could not foresee the end state of independent power production, they said.    They also felt that a paper was needed to get clarity on how the integrated energy plan and the integrated resources plan locked into the NDP.

The DoE promised to respond to MPs questions in writing through the chair as the minister of energy had taken up most of the debating time available.

Other articles in this category or as background

  • http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/electricity-connections-target-far-short/
  • http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/electricity-tariffs-billiton-tells-its-side/
  • http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/major-metros-open-up-on-electricity-tariffs/
  • http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/eskom-issues-alerts/

Posted in cabinet, Electricity, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts0 Comments

Illegal diesel coming in from Mozambique

DOE working with customs……

Department of energy (DoE), admitted to the portfolio committee on energy that they knew of illegal diesel fuel imports emanating from Mozambique and that the department was working with customs and excise officials to track down culprits. DoE was reporting on its third and fourth quarter performance figures.

DoE confirmed that in many cases tanker transport was being used and in most instances the fuel itself was sub-standard, sometimes being a mixture of diesel and other fuels such as paraffin. Most of the fuel was being offered to farmers at cheap rates.

The subject arose when Mr L Malaudzi, acting chief operating officer, was outlining to members many of the issues involved in DoE’s programmes on governance and compliance. He explained the department’s inability to hold a planned anti-fraud workshop due to time constraints and other more pressing issues but promised that such a workshop would be conducted in the first quarter of 2013/4 and he would call stakeholders.

Focus point Mpumalanga

Questions arose from opposition members that fuel was being offered for sale in some areas of Mpumalanga from such sources. Tseliso Maqubela, deputy director general, confirmed that DoE was aware of such incidents and that the department of customs and excise had many problems with goods passing through this “porous border” nearby and that cheap and sometimes “dirty” fuels were on the list of issues.

Maqubela confirmed in his report to parliamentarians on petroleum regulations during the final quarter of 2012/3, that 92 site inspections over and above the target of 1500 sites had been completed but that no fuel sample testing was conducted due to a lack of budget for this function. This subject was to be deferred to next year, he said.

No budget to investigate

In discussing fuel specifications generally, Maqubela confirmed that DoE would “speak to industries to see if we can re-prioritise the matter”. He did not elaborate on this as to whether he was talking about capital projects or fuel mixes generally. He said, however, that on border transfers, particularly by road, had to be investigated and a budget of R50m had been requested next year from the fiscus to follow up on this. At the moment, only diesel imports were being followed up in investigations, such investigations also being limited.

On fuel pricing generally, he said that a desk top study on basic fuel pricing (BFP) was being undertaken, the stakeholder discussion portion of the study having been completed in March of this year.   BFP was a major issue nationally at the moment, he said, as were various items that went to make up its structure. He hoped that most of the issues would be resolved with stakeholders towards the end of this year.

Crude oil priorities

On existing crude oil matters, Saldanha, Milnerton and Durban were the current priority areas at the moment for infrastructure development, he said, and whereas before 28% of crude imports came from Iran, he said, “We haven forced to diversify which is exciting because it introduces the issue of African trade”.

The US is now producing considerable quantities of light crude which again has reversed trends and “there is an opportunity for Africa, particularly Angola and Nigeria, to deal with us and take up slack.”

Clean energy savings

On clean energy issues, Ompi Aphane, deputy director general, said that that so far major savings in terms of the municipal energy saving plan had been recorded with fifteen of the twenty eight participants in the DoE programme having registered savings, which Aphane said had translated into some R37m a year and 31,000MWh to the national grid.

However, he reported that the intended strategy plans for biomass, biogas and biofuels had got nowhere and DoE were looking at taking away from SANEDI the responsibility for this undertaking.

Posted in Fuel,oil,renewables, Justice, constitutional, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Government dissatisfied with oil industry BEE progress

A veiled threat was made to the oil industry by the department of energy (DOE) by deputy director general, Tseliso Maqubela, who recently said in Parliament it was important for companies to comply with BEE laws and that one of the implications of the failure to do so “will be to curtail the capacity of those who violate the law (by limiting) their capacity to import products.”

He told reporters at a press conference held to announce the findings of the audit into the oil industry’s performance in terms of the Liquid Fuels Charter that the “results are extremely disappointing given the timelines” and he said that his department was going to create a unit that will specifically deal with compliance in terms of the Liquid Fuels Charter.

“We will ensure that there is compliance on a daily basis, not only with the charter, but with all the other requirements of the law”, he said.

Energy Minister Dipuo Peters said on the same platform that government was not to be held to ransom by companies in the fuel sector that do not comply.   “This is emotional, political, as well as economical blackmail,” she told the media.   The law was being ignored, she complained, and she added that DOE “needed to make sure that all comply with and respect the laws of this country.”

The minister reminded the media that the charter was drawn up in 2000 and called for 25 percent black ownership across the value chain within 10 years but according to the audit “the average effective narrow-based black shareholding is 18.91 percent”.

She continued, “Out of this 18.91 percent, representation for black women stands at a meager 6.72 percent, while only one oil company, Total South Africa, has fully complied with the obligation for ownership by black shareholders.”

Two years ago, minister Peters said, DOE had called for amendments to the Liquid Fuels Charter and the Petroleum Products Act to give black players in the retail fuel industry access to the fuel infrastructure.     What was evident then was that the representation of women in all strategic areas listed in the charter was of great concern, when compared to the expectations of equity norms.

The audit had confirmed this fact and what was needed was for industry players to work together to correct that which was wrong, she said.

The energy department would study the findings and contact different role players to plan the way forward and address problems. The audit findings had been presented to Cabinet, she told reporters, and that matters would be referred to the economic cluster for further review.

SAPA reports that the SA Petroleum Industry Association has said it would speak to the department after an opportunity to review the findings.

Posted in BEE, Cabinet,Presidential, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Transport, Uncategorized0 Comments


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