Tag Archive | treasury

Carbon tax offsets on the way

Tax offsets plan almost ready for Parliament

sent to clients 12 Aug     Only a little reminding is needed that 29 July 2016 was the deadline for comments to carbontax1Treasury on the forthcoming carbon tax offsets plan which Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, has promised will come into effect 1 April 2017 with some saying it might even be as early as 1 Jan 2017.

It was in 2014 that National Treasury published the first carbon tax discussion paper for public comment. It was agreed the that such a tax would be phased in over a period of time, the first phase running up to 2020. The marginal rate was the envisaged at R120 per tonne of CO2 and during phase-one, a basic percentage based threshold of 60% will apply for tax offsets below which tax is not payable in order to assist with transition into the new scheme.

SARS as usual

Everything has been based on South Africa’s commitment to the Copenhagen agreement signed in 2009 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 34% by 2020 and 42% by 2025 – below the “business as usual” scenario.   The motivation provided for the tax remains as “so the cost of climate change an be reflected in the price of goods and services”.

sanedi carbon capIt was agreed that the tax would be administered by SARS.    Since that date, whilst the pro and cons of such a tax caused heated debate in some circles as to whether an introduction of a price mechanism could influence consumer and producer behaviour, the inclusion of Eskom in the tax net left many feeling somewhat helpless due to the utility’s enormity.

Eskom maybe dictates

OUTA complained that “Eskom’s various electricity tariff increases of almost three times the rate of consumer price inflation over the past eight years has become a tax of its own on society.”

They added that the electricity increase impact had resulted in fact to a reduction in electricity and energy as a result and this, which coupled with reduced production and consumption, had inadvertently caused a reduction of greenhouses gases having already taken place, OUTA said.   Of course, this remains totally unproven.

Neither Cabinet nor Treasury/SARS have replied to OUTA’s call to note “unintended consequences”.  No Treasury official it appears has felt that the Copenhagen Agreement can be dis-respected and have presumably felt that OUTA’s platform that a drop in national growth, due to global events and construction problems, has had little to do with the actual design of an overall process to cut carbon emissions over the next period of fifty years or so. The argument continues.

Quantifiable is the word

Now the first phase of the tax offsets are being set in concrete with Treasury having called for comment on theemissions final formula for the first phase of tax proposals, proposing, as before in the draft, that companies can reduce their liability for carbon tax by up to 5% or 10% of their total greenhouse gas emissions, depending on their sector, by investing in qualifying projects that result in quantifiable greenhouse-gas reductions.

Treasury says that the qualifying investments and offsets are likely to be in sectors such as agriculture, public transport, forestry or waste management and the accompanying documents note…“The proposal to use carbon offsets in conjunction with the carbon tax has been widely supported by stakeholders as a cost-effective measure to incentivise GHG emission reductions.”

How not to pay tax….offsets

“Carbon offsets involve specific projects or activities that reduce, avoid, or sequester emissions, and are developed and evaluated under specific methodologies and standards, which enable the issuance of carbon credits”, SARS concludes.

It is worth noting that tax legislation usually comes in the form of a “money” Bill which Parliament can debate butgreen scorpion not amend. Should the debate raise issues, then Parliament can address Treasury who will, according to their dictates, reconsider and change if they alone see fit.  

The general feeling seemed to be from hearings was that this event had to happen in line with other established economies, although OUTA has remained strong on its views that Eskom as a major player in the energy mix is distorting the situation.

The Treasury website has all the details of rules on which tax regulations will be based.
Previous articles on category subject
Treasury’s plan for carbon tax – ParlyReportSA
Carbon offsets paper still open – ParlyReportSA
Carbon Tax under attack from Eskom, Sasol, EIUG – ParlyReportSA
Treasury sticks to its guns on carbon tax – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Energy, Enviro,Water, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Mining, beneficiation, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Budget 2016: more on amnesty

 sent to clients 8 April….

Deadline extended for amnesty…..

In the 2016 Budget presentation, which included an amnesty offer on undeclared overseas funds, it was claimedpravingordhan by the main opposition party that that this year’s financial plan may not have been bold enough to avert a downgrade, top of the mind remaining possible future tax hikes, particularly VAT – on which the jury is still out – and the ballooning public service wage bill.

Among the many other points raised in this year’s budget was the remark by Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan, that “The principles of honesty and fairness needed to be embraced by all South Africans in order to overcome the challenges.”

The amnesty plan

To follow this up with action, Treasury have made a second offer for all those with undeclared assets abroad to get on the right side of the law without penalties and now have extended even that deadline because more time is often needed for applicants to prepare submissions.

“In acting together”, the Minister said, “we can address declining confidence, the retreat of capital and we can combat emerging patterns of predatory behaviour and corruption.” On this issue, he offered amnesty on undeclared offshore income and assets and another chance of the regularisation of offshore affairs.

Very little reaction occurred in parliamentary benches, possibly because the implications meant little personally but in having had to sweep the floor for further tax revenue inputs, any idea that works is a good one and a “voluntary disclosure programme” (to give it it’s technical name) could raise between R2bn to R4bn, once applied. Clearly also the Minister is looking for more reaction to increase funds resulting in the deadline being moved along the calendar.

Budget papers

budget 2016This offer was included with the usual raft of Bills the Minister tabled before he commenced his Budget speech and a few days later debated by the Standing Committee on Finance. They are “money” Bills and cannot be altered by Parliament, only commented upon.

Gordhan warned in his speech that “in terms of the new global disciplines on exchange of information between countries time was running out for tax dodgers who still have undeclared assets outside South Africa.”

Details

There are a number of conditions of course.

SARS will only include 50% of the total amount used to fund the declared acquisition assets before March 2015 in the taxable income column, as it were, and this will subject to normal tax. All refers to items from March 2010 onwards as taxable income at normal rates. Investment returns prior to March 1 will be exempt. Interest arising from tax debts as a result of the voluntary disclosure will only commence from March 2010.

Bearing in mind that relief is also granted from the appropriate penalties that would have applied and any criminal action not taken, this say experts, is a pretty fair offer. Levies will be applied of between 5% and 10% according to whether the funds from proceeds are repatriated or not, which levy must be paid from outside external funds. On levies generally, there are a number of special conditions according to circumstances.

Not just business

Minister Gordhan made it quite clear that the offer was coming from both the Treasury and the Reserve Bank. He said that deceased estates and beneficiaries of discretionary trusts can participate in the programme if they deem and if they admit that the funds were destined for them. Resident South Africans are included in the amnesty.

The grace period was given originally in the Budget for the period October 1 to March 31 of the current government financial year but in hearings before Parliament later, the Standing Committee on Finance listened to business submissions on the Budget and “recommended” to Treasury that this is impractical given the amount of time it takes to come up with all the necessary information and submit, bearing in mind, as we say, Parliament cannot touch a money Bill. Treasury obviously heard this

Public submissions worked

It was chairperson of the Finance Standing Committee, Yunus Carrim, who pointed this out to Treasury after listening to public submissions, so at least he will find that more applicants will probably be encouraged to submit.
Previous articles on category subject
Budget vote speeches: Out of touch with each other – ParlyReportSA
Minister Nene maps survival route – ParlyReportSA
Parliament votes on 2014 budget – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Finance, economic, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts0 Comments

Five Rand

Parliament steps up its financial oversight role

Nene briefs parliamentary oversight chair Carrim…

Commencing its work for the fifth Parliament, the standing committee on finance passed a resolution, before the recent recess, following a strategic plan briefings from SARS and Statistics SA, to step up its oversight on treasury and all other government institutions concerned with finance.

Whilst Parliament’s oversight role on the executive is a constitutional requirement, new chair Yunus Carrim, a diligent parliamentarian who has a record of running a particularly “tight shop”, appears to be fully aware of the mood of the public on state funding and that consequently the current oversight situation is not “business-as-usual” .

Reporting to Carrim and the joint standing committee, finance minister, Nhlanhla Nene, said South Africa’s economy was growing at a moderate pace but was still performing below expectations.

Picture changing

He said South Africa had to grow faster in a way that advanced the interests of the poor and which eliminated poverty. He also asked MPs to be aware that treasury’s strategic plan had been developed at a time of a better global outlook.

He said that whilst the global economic environment is showing signs of improvement, it also remains below optimal levels.   “South Africa is not an island, cut-off from the rest of the global economy”, he said.  “So our economy is performing way below the level of growth that is required to deal with the country’s triple challenges of unemployment, poverty and inequality”.

SARS, he said, was poised to collect R1 trillion in revenue but the volume of national government debt would increase from between R1.4 trillion to R2 trillion in 2016/17, the equivalent of 43% of GDP.  Projected growth figures, minister Nene told parliamentarians, would be provided when the Medium Term Budget Policy Statement was tabled later this year.

At this stage he saw no cutting back on budget votes as provisions were in place to cut back should the situation demand it.

Big backing for state lending

In the current financial year, minister Nene said, the government will recapitalise the Land Bank with R500m and DBSA with R2.5bn.    He said he would also “continue to engage with the various unions and stakeholders to in an attempt to enable a government retirement system to offer good value and protection for retirement savings.”

Finally, he said, he was committed filling all vacant positions in treasury “in order to enhance the functioning of the institution” which he saw as a pillar of the economy.   However, “stringent measures” were already in place to control over-spending or wasted expenditure by the public sector.

Treasury DG, Lungisa Fuzile, in presenting detail of treasury’s plan for the next five years, said there would be more reform of the financial sector so that it was more tightly regulated.

Down the line purchasing

In the coming year, national treasury department planned to implement an upgrade of the management of state financial systems which would allow government to control its supply chain business more efficiently. A new office of Chief Procurement Officer had been given an elevated function in line with reforms in order to centralise procurement and to save costs, in the meanwhile reducing financial leakages.

It was part of the strategic plan to immediately create a technical support programme for infrastructure, he said, and a technical advisory centre was to be completed, which had, as its mandate, oversight of major capital projects on a top priority basis.

DG Fuzile also told the MPs that further priorities were the completion of financial agreements with BRICS countries.  An example of this was the recently much publicised  establishment of a bank and a pool of virtual reserves, not in competition with the IMF, but giving alternative propositions.

Pensions to be re-engineered

Also important, he said, was that public service pensions, both civil and military, administered by the government pension fund would have their business processes “re-engineered and modernised.”

Members of the standing committee expressed the view that the deficit on the current account was of concern to them, as was the balance of payments position. Chair Yunus Carrim requested that parliamentarians be updated immediately on the work of the Davis Tax Review Committee.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/lock-parliament/

Posted in Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Customs Duty Bill cuts out inland ports

Customs Duty Bill allows only for coastal ports…..

city deepIn dealing with the Customs Duty Bill, and its two tandem enabling Bills,  and talking to representatives of SARS and those advising them, there can be no doubt that SARS is working on the basis that current losses to the fiscus due to fraud and avoidance on matters regarding customs duty must be in the region of R4bn to R5bn, based on conservative estimating.  A weak link in the customs collection chain is cited as the line to City Deep and the terminal itself.

No official statement on an estimated figure however can be given, such issues are unproven and unquantifiable, they said, but if current SARS customs revenue is estimated this year at R50bn then a simple loss of 10% will produce such figures.

The massive Bill, drafted purely by SARS, clearly defines that the customs system in South Africa will change and customs clearance will have to be at a coastal port and that the present system of allowing uncleared goods moving to an inland port will cease.

Treasury going ahead

In responding to all the points made during public hearings, Kosi Louw, chief legal advisor, SARS, stated that it will proceed with its tabling on the basis that clear procedures for all stages of the supply chain are set out, monitoring of all stages are more easily monitored by SARS and that the increase in penalties are necessary.

A major concession allowed made by SARS is to include a “fallback” clause; in other words, if the new system imposed by SARS is found not to work or should fail in practice, then SARS would allow automatic reversal to the original situation; i.e. to allow inland ports. Kosi Louw said, however, that he was convinced that the new system would not only work but save the country a lot of money.

BUSA,JCCI opinions rejected

Most of the points raised by BUSA and JCCI were rejected by SARS in the light of the fact that the national interests that arose simply because of the vast amounts of revenue that were being lost to the fiscus. The new Bill brought about few changes in the trading positions of both importer and exporter, they said. 

SARS is insistent that it does not wish to close inland ports, stop container flow, congest the ports or discourage the use of rail or disrupt legitimate trade. However, now that so much digital flow of information is in the form of electronic transmissions rather than paperwork, it is time for SARS to undertake better risk assessments, Louw said, asking for more information that can be easily provided and to provide earlier information to traders and stakeholders so as to plan their supply chains, working on a basis of 1-2% interventions representing investigations.

Goods cannot continue to move purely on the basis of a manifest to an inland port, such manifest not containing tariff, value and origin to determine risk, they said. Thus with no manifest, the goods must in future be cleared by the importer at coastal locations and goods imported by them, not the supplier. Liability therefore becomes an importer’s issue as the ship docks.

Importers will have to pay from port

On the JCCI issues raised that traders will have to change their contracts of sale; sellers will be reluctant to sell goods under the new terms; importers will be badly affected and that delays and congestion will occur at ports, SARS has rejected all these points.

On the issue of CIF determinations, supply contracts and bills of lading, SARS confirmed that they had taken legal advice from Prof, Eiselen, a trade law expert; a maritime law expert, Adv Pammenter SC and Adv, Joubert SC, a customs law expert and no process of importation will be affected at law, they were advised.

A problem was ‘grouping” where say five parties shared a container to import goods where they could not fill a container alone. All five must submit customs clearance forms at coastal points and if one member of the grouping had a problem, then the whole container would be stopped, said Kosie Louw but this only represented 1% of all containers used, they noted.

WTO isues raised

On the issue that JCCI raised that the new Bill was in contravention of World Trade Organisation (WTO) treaties, SARS disagreed, They were party to the discussions with WTO and it is quite clear, they said, that any importation was subjected to national regulations imposed.

The moves in South Africa followed similar moves in Canada, the UK and Russia where specific information is now obtained. Where long distances by road and rail to inland bond points occur, enormous losses to the fiscus in those countries were occurring. The losses at City Deep, Johannesburg, are as high as 26%.

Penalties after three days

Three days are required for a clearance of goods that arrive by ship and penalties will arise after three days.

The implementation of such changes will be delayed by 12 months once the Bill is passed and “a clause will be inserted to allow for consideration of unintended consequences”. Freight forwarding associations and ship operators and their agents also supported the Bill, SARS said, as did Transnet.

In conclusion SARS said that they cannot allow the movement of goods to such a points as City Deep without proper information, such systems now being purely electronic moving from any manual paperwork.

In answer to questions, Louw said that customs control officers at the port no longer would make the decision whether or not to allow through a container. The containers themselves would be cleared or would not be cleared by the new electronic system that received the importer’s information, even interventions would be instructed by the system.

Under questioning, SARS repeated that the seller’s risk ceases at the point of loading the ship in a foreign port after CIF is paid. The only thing that will change is that there is no manifest to clear goods required but a new customs clearance procedure at point of landing by ship at the SA coast or at a border. The first stage of clearance will be in advance, or provisional, and a final release then issued.

SARS convinced that fiscus losses paramount

Finally, in answer to the question as to whether SARS felt that the Bill would damage in any way South Africa’s trade relations or trade figures, SARS denied that it would. It was “just a question of SARS getting better and smarter in the fight to raise more for the fiscus”. The whole system was predictable for all parties, Kosi Louw said, and all carriers have said it will make no difference to trade.

There was no change to the legal status of inland ports, SARS, said. Final rules and regulations can only be issued once the Bill under debate was passed but at this stage the Bill looks set for final approval. Refer previous article in this report.

There is no doubt that all three linked Custom Duty Bills will be passed before Parliament closes
Earlier articles on this subject:
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/fueloilrenewables/illegal-diesel-coming-in-from-mozambique/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//finance-economic/one-stop-border-post-with-mozambique-almost-there/

Posted in Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Carbon Tax under attack from Eskom, Sasol, EIUG

Treasury determined on carbon tax…..

clampInsofar as the policy behind the need to implement a carbon tax, for whatever reason,  there appears to a vast disconnect between cabinet and the various affected government departments, treasury and energy users, said Mike Roussow, head of the Energy Intensive Users Group (EIUG).

This main point arose in a discussion group called together by chair, Sisa Njikelana, of the parliamentary portfolio committee of energy in an attempt to find some common group on the need for such a tax.    He had invited the various parties for a round-table discussion on the subject in order to put their views.

Major run in

Present at the meeting were such major players such as Eskom, Exxaro, BHP Billiton, the South African Petroleum Industry Association (SAPIA), the pulp and paper industry and Sasol.      Treasury was represented by treasury directors Ismael Mamoniat and Cecil Morden.

However, with only members of the portfolio committee on energy present but no representatives of department of energy (DoE), department of water and  environmental affairs (DWEA) or department of agriculture and fisheries (DAFF), nor any other portfolio committees such as trade and industry or environmental affairs, the discussions had little depth, said Rossouw.

Little by little says treasury

Treasury added to the discussion by stating that the point of departure was the White Paper on Climate Change and this was the basis for the tax proposals before them. The object was to change behaviour but unlike smoking legislation, such a tax would be introduced at a very low level so that energy users with emissions got used to the idea, thus giving a longer period to adjust, bearing in mind the costs of doing so.

“The worst scenario would be to wait and to introduce a sudden and crippling tax in years ahead” said Mamoniat.    The treasury officials referred to shale gas and sea gas possibilities, recognizing that these  may change the energy mix or the energy scenario, and treasury officials noted that whilst business did not like taxes and would object to their introduction on principle, a system had to be started and once going this would change behaviour.

Why be first, says business

Much of the debate centered around the fact that South Africa, with its slow rate of economic growth, business was not in a position to contribute to being a world leader, least of all being amongst the first to introduce such a tax globally.     “Perhaps we should not be leaders, but simply fast followers”, said one party to the debate who objected to the tax.

Eskom said it was saving most of its comments for the official responses to the carbon tax policy proposals recently gazetted but said that every unit it had was running at full capacity during the winter period and the cold weather currently being experienced, all effort being expended to accommodate the integrated resource plan (IRP), the anchor document for energy direction “to which the carbon tax proposals makes not one reference”, they complained.

Ducks not in a row, says Eskom

The Eskom team presenting, headed by Ms Caroline Henry, acting finance director, was pointed when said it was totally premature to introduce such a tax especiallywhen DWAE and DOE were still working on producing an integrated energy plan for the country.      The treasury proposals, she said, represented bad timing in every respect, bearing in mind that President Zuma had already announced that the country had no intention in changing its investment conditions or the economic scenario with any new conditions.     Such proposals were totally inappropriate therefore at this time, Eskom said.

Eskom added that the IRP already came up with a 34% savings factor on emissions but what was not needed at this stage, they concluded, were additional costs and further taxes added to a plan they had been working to for a long time.   Mamoniat appeared unmoved by this objection.

Sasol firm in objections

Sasol volunteered the remark that to introduce a carbon tax fully knowing that the country was totally reliant on coal gave the impression that they were out of touch with reality. They pointed to the fact that cost of the country’s exports were mainly energy intensive resulting in South Africa loosing competitiveness, if this course were adopted.

Sasol agreed that a carbon tax was one of many tools that could be used in causing industry to further mitigate the effect of carbon emissions but its introduction now was premature, they said. The costs to Sasol would be prohibitive in any case when applied to certain operations.

“We should not introduce a tool that can make no difference to a situation”, said the Sasol representative, who added, “Asking not to introduce a tax is not to say we are doing nothing.  Plenty is being done in mitigation of emissions. This country is one of the leaders carbon reduction programmes worldwide”, they added.

Liquid fuels industry over committed

SAPIA called for a practical approach and asked what really the industry could do that was not already being done. Already the petroleum industry was over-committed to modernisation and new fuel specifications.    The current world oil importation story placed the industry in a delicate position, as treasury must have surely realized, they said.

Quite clearly in the petroleum industry, said SAPIA, there is no satisfactory return on investment and the only sensible recourse in their mind was to provide conditions where the motorist was called upon to reduce consumption.

EIUG queries common approach

EIUG repeated their initial supposition that there appeared no joint departmental overall government approach to such a tax which appeared to be the brainchild of treasury, possibly in conjunctions with DWEA. They said that it appeared that neither appreciated how much was already done and what was being planned in terms of the climate response policy calls, both globally and locally.

“We cannot and should not be the world leaders in the introduction of carbon tax”, they said. “Aside from this, there are many things wrong with the way the tax is constructed.”

Eskom queries basis of tax

Eskom concluded that it was disingenuous of treasury department to suggest that nobody was doing anything answer to reduce emissions.  In any case, the tax was not being introduced at a low rate, they said and Eskom produced figures showing the tax as suggested when applied to current production output numbers which they said would be quite crippling. They added that the effects of the tax on the Medupi and Kusile power station projects when in production totally contradicted treasury calculations on the same subject.

The discourse was closed by the chair on the note that carbon tax as a proposal could not proceed in a vacuum and he acknowledged the point that it seemed reasonable not to consider this before the production of the final integrated energy plan had been tabled and agreed upon, let alone agreement on the final energy mix involving nuclear, gas and clean energy renewables.

Treasury appears dedicated to tax

Parliament is now empowered to deal with a Money Bill as a result of the 2011 amendments to the Constitution should the carbon tax policy paper result in a draft Bill for public comment but it could be considered unusual in these early stages of parliamentary development on the issue to exercise such muscle and the matter no doubt depends on what message comes down from cabinet to party whips. The Bill would come from the Minister of Finance.

Refer previous articles in this category
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/treasury-sticks-to-its-guns-on-carbon-tax/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/carbon-tax-not-popularly-received-by-parliament/

 

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Electricity, Enviro,Water, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Treasury tables Credit Rating Bill to upgrade risk measures

Released initially for public comment in August last year, National Treasury has tabled the Credit Rating Services Bill in Parliament .

The hope is to promote greater investor protection; more integrity; increased transparency and more evident accountability in financial dealings, thus it is hoped and improvement and greater international acceptance of the integrity and value of South African markets.

Whilst treasury officials have described credit rating agencies as important instruments in the financial backdrop of South Africa providing measures against credit risk and enhancing security, the Bill states one of its objectives “as a shift towards a twin-peak model for regulating the financial sector” and the introduction of a “wider macro-prudential system of supervision.

Pravin Gordhan referred to such a draft Bill in his 2011 budget speech when he spoke of reforms for the financial sector, “We need a safer financial sector to serve South Africa better”, he said. At the same time the minister has called for public comment on the draft Financial Services Laws General Amendment Bill, legislation in tandem.

Under the new Credit Rating Services Bill, credit rating agencies will be registered; certain financial rating activities will be controlled; the principle of insurance of credit rating will be extended and rules for agencies will be stipulated.

Posted in Finance, economic, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Uncategorized0 Comments

Gordhan gives out strong message on carbon tax

en:Primorye Power Plant in Luchegorsk, Primors...

Image via Wikipedia

Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan is reported to have told lawmakers in Cape Town that a revised carbon tax policy paper is definitely due sometime in the course of 2012 and that government has agreed in principle to the need to price carbon emissions and on the phasing in of a tax based on such a pricing structure.

BUSA has, in the meanwhile, called upon the cabinet for relevant ministers to engage further on a framework before implementing any such proposals on a carbon tax, especially given recent electricity price hikes and rising costs to the consumer. Similarly, the Manufacturing Circle said it “would welcome the opportunity for engagement”, with the caveat that a carbon tax, if not applied suitably, would “hurt manufacturing and jobs”.

National Treasury has argued previously that such a tax was necessary to create incentives for the public and industry to change behaviour and to encourage cleaner-energy technology and energy-efficiency amongst the public.

Posted in Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Transport, Uncategorized0 Comments


This website is Archival

If you want your publications as they come from Parliament please contact ParlyReportSA directly. All information on this site is posted two weeks after client alert reports sent out.

Upcoming Articles

  1. MPRDA : Shale gas developers not satisfied
  2. Environmental Bill changes EIAs
  3. Border Mangement Bill grinds through Parliament

Earlier Editorials

Earlier Stories

  • Anti Corruption Unit overwhelmed

    Focus on top down elements of patronage  ….editorial….As Parliament went into short recess, the Anti-Corruption Unit, the combined team made up of SARS, Hawks, the National Prosecuting Authority and Justice Department, divulged […]

  • PIC comes under pressure to disclose

    Unlisted investments of PIC queried…. When asked for information on how the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) had invested its funds, Dr  Daniel Matjila, Chief Executive Officer, told parliamentarians that the most […]

  • International Arbitration Bill to replace BITs

    Arbitration Bill gets SA in line with UNCTRAL ….. The tabling of the International Arbitration Bill in Parliament will see ‘normalisation’ on a number of issues regarding arbitration between foreign companies […]

  • Parliament rattled by Sizani departure

    Closed ranks on Sizani resignation….. As South Africa struggles with the backlash of having had three finance ministers rotated in four days and news echoes around the parliamentary precinct that […]

  • Protected Disclosures Bill: employer to be involved

    New Protected Disclosures Bill ups protection…. sent to clients 21 January……The Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Affairs will shortly be debating the recently tabled Protected Disclosures Amendment Bill which proposes a duty […]