Tag Archive | transnet port authority

NRCS hammered over port delays

NRCS admits failure to meet LOA targets

…..sent to clients 16 Oct…...The National Regulator for Compulsory Specificationsasogan-moodley (NRCS), responsible for the issuance of letters of authority (LRAs) to complete import certification of imports in respect of critical safety regulations, came under intensive fire in Parliament from MPs across all party lines.

This included a warning from Trade and Industry Portfolio Committee Chairperson, Joan Fubbs, that the NRCS failure to meet its annual targets, particularly bearing in mind such targets were set by themselves, was not acceptable.

Chair Fubbs told CEO Asogan Moodley of NRCS his agency was “a blot on the otherwise excellent annual performance of the Department of Trade Industry (DTI)”, NRCS being the only one of the seventeen DTI entities to receive a qualified annual report from the Auditor General’s office for the past year.

Durban is problem area

sars-warehouse-durbNRCS has a mandate to provide LOAs for clearing goods for sale or service in various categories of goods imported into South Africa, with the port of entry of Durban providing most of the problems in supplying the necessary LOAs. Chair Fubbs said that the poor performance already shown in the first quarter of the current financial year did not auger well for any change in the immediate future. This cannot be the case, she warned.

NRCS divides imports into the main categories of automotive including all components; chemicals, materials and mechanicals; electro-technical including IT and electronic appliances and food in the form of fishery products, canned meat and processed meat. NRCS also ensures standards on building supplies and checks calibration and checks of weights and measuring equipment supplies, including gaming equipment.

Massive backlogs

CEO Moodley told parliamentarians that outstanding LOAs over the recognised maximum period of 120 days were, at worst, 191 days – where 179 consignments were involved. In all some 1,500 consignments exceeded 120 days across all imports at various ports of entry, he said. The worst failures to supply import LOAs were in respect of electrical goods, IT appliances, vehicles and automotive parts.

All imports were checked on a “risk-based approach” and dived into low-risk, medium-risk andcargo-vessels-durban high-risk as far as consumers were concerned. Target turnaround time, after inspection and issue of relative LOAs, was respectively 75 calendar days for low-risk, 90 calendar days for medium-risk and 120 calendar days for high-risk.

Asogan Moodley emphasised that a major problem had been that DTI had changed working days into calendar days which had overtime connotations for NRCS with already limited staffing levels.

The whole truth

Chair Fubbs queried the number of days that cargo was outstanding supplied by NRCS in their annual report, stating that she was aware that the situation was far worse that indicated by NRCS in their presentation. In fact, a number of consignments needed by commerce and industry has been sitting in bond for nearly a year, she said. This was not acceptable, she warned.

warehouseCEO Moodley named his problems in clearing goods as being as being a result of short staffing of expert examiners, who were difficult to find – although some personnel were being trained or re-trained to meet technological changes. Compounding the problem, he said, was the necessity to update the entire NRCS IT ability, which was budgeted for but which had not yet been completed.

He also complained that the volumes of incoming imports and the technical advances represented almost monthly in imported goods were not exponentially related to the growth of NRCS, its skills base and the level of monitoring expertise, particularly at major ports.

IT gear just standing

In respect of the electro-technical category, he said that whilst inspections were up 11% transnet-container-terminalagainst target, the processing of LOAs within the financial year stood at 68% lower than the target for 120 days turnaround. In other instances, inspections carried out at source or at retail level were also short on target level but CEO Moodley assured the Committee that the NRCS had embarked upon a process of implementing a new system of automation and modernisation to improve performance.

He said it would take 18 months to complete such a programme at a total cost of R50m.
Major problems encountered were that certificates of origin supplied by importers which differed when the same goods were subsequently imported resulting in the need for fresh LOAs and that all processes at present were manual which increased load.    He called for the regulations to be changed so that more categories were allowed for so that very low risk products could be handled specifically on a quicker turn-around basis.

Opposition members said that they could not see how this would improve the situation since the problem appeared to be an inability to handle any volumes with untrained staff, whether low risk or high risk.    MPs noted that import bottlenecks were a financial threat to businesses and industry who were reliant on such imports and failure by DTI in this regard led to job losses and low growth.

Technical advances not in tune                nrcs-logo                                    

CEO Moodley and his team of departmental heads went to great lengths to explain the technical variations in international goods and imports coming from various countries that were either substandard or which had wrong documentation. He said that the failure to provide standards for treated timber and safety footwear, for example, had caused a backlog and such issues as non or sub-standard tyres on vehicles had slowed things down in the automotive sector.

He complained that the lack of consistency in supplied products and the constant attempts to short-circuit the system by importers accounted for much of the delay in turnaround.

Where it matters

CEO Moodley said that the electro-technical industries represented an area where most product failures occurred.  He added that the introduction of LED technology had compounded the checks for accuracy and reliability and such issues as compatibility of electrical goods, in many cases portable generators and white goods, had a poor record of power specification labeling and consequent safety in South Africa.

This was a growing problem with many countries who worked to different standards, various plugging methods and a different disclosure ethic.

Warning

durban-port-bigIn conclusion, when the debate was wound up, the Committee noted that a complete change of direction in the methods and ability of NRCS to meet its targets had to be found and that future presentations by NRCS reflecting such dismal results would not be tolerated.

As a result of a number of critical comments from MPs across party lines, the backlog of 1,650 LOAs over 120 days would be tackled, regulator Moodley promised, “by October” but stated this as being with the use of “new inspectors”.

Also, in an effort to speed up the search for unsafe or non-compliant products, there would be no need to obtain a new LOA for additional imports of a product where one had been additionally granted, he said. However, NRCS reserved the right to carry out spot checks.

Consequences

From a subsequent follow-up report in Business Day, it was learnt that DTI had confirmed the resignation of CEO Asogan Moodley and that such a move “had been a decision of Mr Moodley himself”. Trade and Industry Minister, Rob Davies, said he had instructed DTI’s DG, Lionel October, “to engage with NRCS to ensure they meet their targets”.

DTI said that Minister Davies “simply expects management and labour of DTI entities to meet their targets”, referring specifically to LOA targets in the case of NRCS.
Previous articles on category subject
Customs Duty Bill cuts out inland ports – ParlyReportSA
Border Authority to get grip on immigration – ParlyReportSA
Tax law changes after mid-year budget – ParlyReportSA
New Customs Duty Bill opposed by BUSA – ParlyReportSA

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