Tag Archive | Rob Davies

Liquor licensing may have impractible conditions

DTI gets tough with age limits

...sent to clients 17 Oct…..   In what will be a tough ask, Minister of Trade and Industry, Robliqour-store Davies has proposed a number of changes to the National Liquor Act, the most contentious being to raise the legal minimum age for purchasing liquor from 18 to 21 years of age. The call for public comment on the draft National Liquor Amendment Bill as gazetted closed on 30 October.

The Department and Trade and Industry (DTI), who deal with liquor licensing at a national level, state that South Africa has globally the worst figures for alcohol related accidents and anti-social incidents involving liquor abuse.

Drastic steps had to be taken to gain control of alcohol related injuries, illnesses and abusive behaviour that were costing the state some R40bn a year, the Minister said.

Younger age groups

The Bill focuses specifically on youth since DTI maintains that alcohol abuse specifically damages the development of the brain making youth vulnerable. Liquor advertising aimed specifically at young persons will be prohibited under the Act and revised rules set down on broadcast times and content. Advertising billboards aimed at youth will be banned from high density urban areas.

Minister Davies called for “robust public engagement on the issues raised in the Bill” as it dealt with matters “that are of significance to South African society.” He noted that South Africans consume alcohol related products at double the world average rate.

On the question of the age threshold proposed in the draft Bill is a minimum purchasing age, not as has been widely reported a “minimum drinking age”. The onus of establishing age will fall upon the supplier who must take “reasonable steps to establish age” when dealing with a young purchaser.

Pressure point

A civil liability will now fall upon the manufacturers and suppliers as well who knowingly breach the new regulations, Minister Davies said, believing that this was the only way to get the problem understood and the new rules adhered to.

sab-youth-beer-adThe draft Bill states that responsibility will also fall upon the seller not only not to supply liquor to a person visibly under the influence of alcohol but that the seller could be in addition asked to show reason why they should not bear costs for damage incurred as a result of a subsequent accident involving that person who made the purchase.

On the problem of community issues, such as tackling foetal alcohol syndrome which is considerably worse in South Africa than elsewhere in the world and alcohol related crime, the onus of proof will shift not only to a supplier but also to manufacturers to show that reasonable steps were taken to ensure that liquor is not sold to illegal or unlicensed outlets. Which brings up the issue of liquor licences.

Distance from community

Licensing is a provincial matter and there are a number of changes that the amending Bill police-raidwill make to the anchor Act which will have to be abided by. Particularly notable is the proposal that licences cannot be granted to an outlet less than 500 metres from any school, recreation facilities and places of worship.

Provinces are stated as “having an obligation” to be far stricter in granting licences in highly urbanised areas, giving due regard for the need for stricter business hours and for the need to deal with noise pollution in stressful living conditions.

Previous articles on category subject
New health regulations in place soon: DoH – ParlyReportSA
Licensing of Businesses Bill re-emerges – ParlyReportSA
Medicines Bill : focus on foodstuffs – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Justice, constitutional, Security,police,defence, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Small business gets R1bn incentive scheme

Tax relief and business incentives

The new small business development department (SBDD) has transferred from the department of trade and industry (DTI) the R1bn fund which covers both corporate incentives to develop small business and the Small  Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA).

However, it will leave with DTI all matters relating to B-BBEE insofar as regulations are concerned.  Both the new minister, Lindiwe Zulu, and deputy minister, Elizabeth Thabethe, were present for a short departmental briefing by SBDD given to the new small business portfolio committee chaired by Ruth Bengu, who in the last parliamentary period served as chair of the transport committee.

Revised thinking

In an earlier portfolio committee meeting of trade and industry, a few days before under their chair, experienced ANC member Joan Fubbs, DTI had called for a rethink on small business policy.

They said they wanted to see a clearer policy on the SMME support role by national government with provincial and local government and to establish a programme for rolling out more small business “incubators”- something that opposition parties had been calling for over a long period of time.

Also DTI supported the call to review the small claims court system so that access to affordable justice was more affordable. They wanted this to be a further target of the new department.

Such recommendations came amidst a foray of criticism by commentators that the new department could become a diversion for unsolvable small business issues or alternatively the new department could become merely a point for start-up small business without any real muscle.

Less red tape

The new department in addressing MPs confirmed to them that its mandate was to focus on “enhanced business support” and they emphasised their support for women, people with disabilities and to provide mechanisms to access finance, business skills development.  They also said they were there to ease regulatory conditions; to help regulate better the SMME environment and to give leverage on public procurement.

It was important to recognise, SBDD said, that it was also there to encourage the development of cooperative entities, in which instance shareholders themselves were the members and entrepreneurs. Finally, the process of creating market access was an important task, they added. Nothing was new here.

But opposition ears pricked up when they said tax relief grants to corporates that invested in small business development were to be considered and incubation programmes and technology upliftment were priorities.  The immediate future, however, was all about configuring the new department; the “migration” of responsibilities from DTI; and transferring allocations for the establishment of support institutions.

Chair of the committee, Ruth Bhengu – previously chair of the parliamentary transport committee – then called for response from opposition members which mainly came from Toby Chance of the DA, whose questions were answered by both by the new minister and deputy minister.

Jobs or not

Chance said that whilst applauding the formation of this department, he wanted to know whether or not any success was to be measured in terms of jobs created,  which to him was the bottom line, he said. Also he wanted a clearer definition of what government actually meant by the term “small business”.

He said there were plenty of “gleaming new supermarkets in our townships but very little industrial developments, in fact some industrial parks were in a state of decay.” Chance said the DA was also worried that the impact of new labour legislation and labour regulations was immobilising small business and the amount of red tape currently being experienced was becoming “out of hand”.

Chance said he hoped the new department recognised the fact that that corporates and industry should focus on the development of small businesses to create the job growth called for by the NDP.   Partnerships with small business were the best way of achieving this, he noted.  He concluded that all “tax incentives should be re-visited” and that more emphasis should be laid on small manufacturing businesses.

In reply, minister Lindiwe Zulu agreed on the issue of red tape as a hindrance to small business and said her objective was to become like Rwanda where direct contact with national bodies that supported initiatives was far easier.

Compliance for all

However, she said that business had to understand that it had a role to play and a “culture of compliance” had to be encouraged in both small and large business and manufacturers or there would be anarchy.   Also large businesses and the state will have pay small business invoices on thirty days or risk penalties.

The minister said on the subject of labour regulations, dept of labour had its own targets and own agenda on decent work conditions and that was a separate issue. “The job of small business development was to work inside current conditions and for business to respect that.”

Chance replied that the governing party seemed to have “developed a track record of “attacking business persons when they criticised ANC economic policies or asked tough questions”, which statement prompted vehement denials from the minister and deputy minister.

Other articles in this category or as background
//parlyreportsa.co.za//trade-industry/licensing-of-businesses-bill-re-emerges/
//parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/minister-davies-gets-cooperatives-bill-approved/
//parlyreportsa.co.za//parlyreport-contacts/cabinet-ministers/ministry-small-business-development/

Posted in Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments


This website is Archival

If you want your publications as they come from Parliament please contact ParlyReportSA directly. All information on this site is posted two weeks after client alert reports sent out.

Upcoming Articles

  1. PIC Bill passage indicates sleight of hand by governing party
  2. Climate legislation Bill links on carbon tax

Earlier Editorials

Earlier Stories