Tag Archive | operation phakisa

Marine Spatial Bill targets ocean resources…

Bill to bring order to marine economy…

In the light of President Zuma’s emphasis in his recent speeches on oil and gas issues, it is important to couple this in terms of government policy with the tabling of the section 76 Marine Spatial Planning Bill (MSP Bill).  The proposals are targeted at business and industry  to establish “a marine spatial planning system” offshore over South African waters.

The Bill  also says it is aimed at “facilitating good ocean governance, giving effect to South Africa’s international obligations.”

A briefing by the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) on their proposals is now awaited in Parliament. The Bill until recently was undergoing controversial hearings in the provinces as is demanded by its section 76 nature.

Water kingdom

The MSP Bill applies to activities within South Africa’s territorial waters known as Exclusive Economic Zones, which are mapped out areas with co-ordinates within South Africa’s continental shelf claim and inclusive of all territorial waters extending the Prince Edward Islands.

The Bill flows, government says, from its Operation Phakisa plan to develop South Africa’s sea resources, notably oil and gas.   The subject has recently been subject to hearings in SA provinces that have coastal activities. This importantly applies to South African and international marine interests operating from ports in Kwa-Zulu Natal and the Eastern and Western Cape but also  involves coastal communities and their activities.

International liaison

Equally as important as maritime governance, is the wish to assist in job creation by letting in work creators.  Accounted for also are international oceanic environmental obligations to preserve nature and life supporting conditions which DEA state can in no way can be ignored if maritime operations and industrial seabed development are to be considered.

South Africa is listed as a UNESCO participant, together with a lengthy list of other oceanic countries, agreements which, whilst not demanding total compliance on who does what, are in place to establish a common approach to be respected by oceanic activity, all to be agreed in the 2016/7 year.  South Africa is running late.

Invasion protection

Whilst the UNESCO discipline covers environmental aspects and commercial exploitation of maritime resources, the MSP Bill now before Parliament states that in acknowledging these international obligations, such must be balanced with the specific needs of communities, many of whom have no voice in an organised sense.

As Operation Phakisa has its sights set on the creation of more jobs from oceanic resources therefore, the MSP Bill becomes a balancing act for the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and the Bill is attracting considerable interest as a result.

The hearings in the Eastern Cape have already exposed the obvious conundrum that exists between protecting small-time fishing interests and community income in the preservation of fishing waters and development of undersea resources.  What has already emerged that the whole question of the creation of future job creation possibilities from seabed-mining, oil and gas exploration and coastal sand mining is not necessarily understood, as has been heard from small communities.

The ever present dwindling supply of fish stocks is not also accepted in many quarters, with fishing quotas accordingly reduced.

Tug of war

All views must be considered nevertheless but from statements made at the political top in Parliament it becomes evident that the potential of developing geological resources far outweigh the needs of a shrinking fishing industry.  At the same time, politicians usually wish to consider votes and at parliamentary committee level, the feedback protestfrom the many localised hearings is being heard quite loudly.

As one traditional fishing person said at the hearings in the Eastern Cape, “The sea is our land but we can only fish in our area to sustain life. The law is stopping us fishing for profit.”

Local calls

The attendees at many hearings have said that the MSP Bill and similar regulations in force restrict families from earning from small local operations such as mining sand; allow only limited fishing licences and call for homes to be far from the sea denying communities the right to benefit from the sea and coastal strips for a living.

Hearings last went to the West Coast and were held with Saldanha Bay communities.

Big opportunities

Conversely, insofar as Operation Phakisa is concerned, President Zuma, as has been stated, said clearly in his latest State of Nation AddressZuma that government has an eye for much more investment into oil and gas exploration.   He has since announced that there are plans afoot to drill at least 30 deep-water oil and gas exploration wells within the next 10 years as part of Operation Phakisa.

Coupled to this is the more recent comment in Parliament that once viable oil and gas reserves are found, the country could possibly extract up to 370 000 barrels of fossil fuels each day within 20 years – the equivalent of 80% of current oil and gas imports.

According to the deadline set by the Operation Phakisa framework, the MSP Bill should have been taken to Parliament at the beginning of December 2016 for promulgation as an Act by the end of June 2017, making it appear that things are running late.

Environmental focus

As the legislation is environmentally driven, with commercial interests coming to the surface in a limited manner at this stage, the matter is being handled by the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs.    It is understood that later joint meetings will be held with the Trade and Industry Committee and with Energy Committee members.

Adding to the picture that is now beginning to emerge, is the fact that Minister of Science and Technology, Naledi Pandor, has signed a MOU with the Offshore Petroleum Association of South Africa.

Minister Pandor said at the time of signing, “The South African coastal and marine environment is one of our most important assets.   Currently South Africa is not really deriving much from the ocean’s economy. This is therefore why we want to build a viable gas industry and unlock the country’s vast marine resources.”

Moves afoot

OPASA is now to make more input with offshore oil and gas exploration facts and figures.   Energy publications are now bandying figures around that developments in this sphere will contribute “about R20bn to South Africa’s GDP over a five-year period.”   If this is the case, the Energy Minister might be compromised once again, as she was with renewables, on the future makeup of the planned energy mix.

Amongst the particularly worrying issues raised by opposition parliamentarians and various groupings in agricultural and fishing areas is that there is a proposal in the MSP Bill on circuit states that the Act will trump all other legislation when matters relate to marine spatial planning. DEA will have to answer this claim.

Opposition

Earthlife Africa have also stated at hearings in Richards Bay that in their opinion “Operation Phakisa has very little to do with poverty alleviation and everything to do with profits for corporates, most likely with the familiar kickbacks for well-connected ‘tenderpreneurs’ and their political allies.”

This is obviously no reasoned argument and just a statement but gives an indication of what is to be faced by DEA in the coming months.

Giants enter

With such diverse views being expressed on the Bill, President Zuma and past Minister  of Energy, Mmamaloko Kubayi cannot have missed the announcement that Italy’s Eni and US oil and gas giant, Anadarko, have signed agreements with the Mozambique government to develop gas fields and build two liquefied natural gas terminals on the coast to serve Southern African countries.

Eni says it is spending $8bn to develop the gas fields in Mozambique territorial waters and Anadarko is developing Mozambique’s first onshore LNG plant consisting of two initial LNG trains with a total capacity of 12-million tonnes per annum.  More than $30bn, it has been stated in a joint release by those companies, is expected to be invested in Mozambique’s natural gas sector in the near future.

Impetus gaining

In general, therefore, the importance of a MSP Bill is far greater than most have realized. The vast number of countries called upon to have their MSP legislation in place also indicates international pressure for the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs to move at speed.

This follows a worldwide shift to exploiting maritime resources, an issue not supported by most enviro NGOs and green movements without serious restrictions.  Most parliamentary comments indicate that the trail for oil and gas revenues needs following up and the need to create jobs in this sector is even greater.

Ground rules

Whilst the oil and gas industry and the proponents of Operation Phakisa also recognize that any form of MSP Bill should be approved to provide gateway rules for their operations and framework planning, the weight would seem to be behind the need for clarity in legislation and urgency in implementation of not only eco-friendly but labour creating legislation.

Operation Phakisa, as presented to Parliament particularly specified that the development of MSP legislation was necessary and Sean Lunn, chairperson of OPASA has said that the Bill will “add tangible value to South Africa’s marine infrastructure, protection services and ocean governance.”  He said it will go a long way in mitigating differences between the environmentalists and developers.

Not so nice

On seabed mining, the position with the MSP Bill is not so clear, it seems.    Saul Roux for the Centre for Environmental Rights (CER) says that the Department of Mineral Resources granted a few years ago three rights to prospect for marine phosphates.

He also stated that the marine process “involves an extremely destructive form of mining where the top three metres of the seabed is dredged up and consequently destroys critical, delicate and insufficiently understood sea life in its wake.”   Phosphates are predominantly used for agricultural fertiliser.

“These three rights”, he said “extend over 150,000 km2 or 10% of South Africa’s exclusive economic zone.”

Something happening

One of CER’s objectives, Roux says, is to have in place a moratorium on bulk marine sediment mining in South Africa.   He complains that despite the three mining rights having been gazetted, he cannot get any response from Minister of Mineral Resources, Mosebenzi Zwane, or any access to any documents on the subject.

He stated there were two South African companies involved in mining sea phosphates and one international group, these being Green Flash Trading 251, Green Flash Trading 257 and Diamond Fields International, a Canadian mining company. All appeared to be interested in seabed exploration for phosphates although not necessarily mining itself.

Roux called for the implementation of an MSP Bill which specifically disallowed this activity as is the case in New Zealand, he said.

Coming your way

The MSP Bill was tabled in April 2017 and once provincial hearings are complete it will come to Parliament. The results of these hearings will be debated and briefings commenced when announced shortly.

Previous articles on category subject

Operation Phakisa to develop merchant shipping – ParlyReportSA

Hide and seek over R14.5bn Ikhwezi loss – ParlyReportSA

Green Paper on nautical limits to make SA oceanic nation – ParlyReportSA

Gas undoubtedly on energy back burner – ParlyReportSA

 

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Operation Phakisa to develop merchant shipping

Operation Phakisa: SA needs own merchant ships…

mapafrica&saCurrently, the cabinet is focused on Operation Phakisa, or South Africa’s exploitation of its oceanic resources, bearing in mind it has 6,000kms of coastline. In its budget vote presentation to Parliament, the department of transport (DoT) has indicated that it has every intention of not only building a South African maritime fleet but encouraging “Panama type” registration for vessels around the world.

Dramatically announcing that South Africa had to become “a maritime nation”, minister of transport, Dipuo Peters, said that a maritime delivery unit had been established within DoT to support the NDP’s key growth strategy for the development of the oceanic economy, launched earlier by the President in his SONA address as Operation Phakisa.

Focus on shipping world

MSC-Beatrice-PanamaCurrently she said DoT had introduced a new shipping tax regime for international shipping which exempts qualifying ship owners from paying income tax; capital gains tax; dividend tax; and withholding tax on interest for a number of years.

Minister Peters said, “We believe this tax exemption will undoubtedly encourage the South African ship register to be sought-after internationally and we are further engaging national treasury to consider a special tax regime for coastal and regional shipping.”

In June 2012, a department of DoT led by Tsietsi Mokhele of the SA Maritime Safety Authority, called for a policy framework to enable the establishment of both a coastal and a blue-water merchant fleet, following a meeting with the then NA Speaker, Max Sisulu, who had called for more information on where South Africa stood with regard to maritime affairs internationally.

All foreign vessels

Mokhele told Parliament’s transport portfolio committee that about 98 percent of South Africa’s total import and export trade was currently carried by foreign ships and currently South Africa does not have a single own-flagged commercial vessel on its shipping register.

He said at the time, “South Africa has no ships on its register and paid in 2007 about R37bn in maritimeSAFMARINE_CHAMBAL transport services to foreign owners and operators and had approximately 12,000 vessels visiting the country’s eight commercial ports each year”.

In the previous year (2011), 264 million tons of cargo were moved by sea at an estimated cost of R45bn to the country the committee heard and in the BRICS grouping, South Africa stood alone with no vessels, whilst Brazil operated a fleet of 172 merchant vessels, India 534, China 2044 and Russia 1891.

Not self-reliant

“We are almost 100 percent dependent on foreign shipping to get our goods to market, despite South Africa being a maritime country with over 3,000km of coastline and a vast seaward economic exclusion zone”, he said.

Mokhele told parliamentarians that the country’s sea-borne cargo constituted at that time a “significant” 3.5 % of global sea trade. “Yet all the benefits of shipping cost overheads to export destinations in the case of South Africa accrue to the nation from which the ship transport emanates”, he said.  He claimed that all South Africa’s maritime fleet had been “sold off by the apartheid government”.

Infrastructure is there

oil_tankerDuring this year’s budget vote speech, minister Peters said the facts were extraordinary and she confirmed that SA had a massive coastline positioned on sea trading routes with thee world’s largest bulk coal terminal port in Richards Bay; the busiest port in African Africa with the largest container facility in the Southern Africa; the deepest container terminal in Africa; Cape Town had the biggest refrigerated container facility in Africa and Saldhana Bay was the largest port in Africa by water footprint.

She added that South Africa is among the top fifteen countries that trade by sea with 96% of the country’s imports and exports moving by sea transportation yet the country had no merchant fleet of any kind.

Elements to Operation Phakisa

Minister Peters said that Operation Phakisa focused on three areas, namely, offshore oil and gas exploration; aquaculture; and marine protection services and oceans governance, the last named being run by the aforementioned SAMSA whose new maritime safety programme has a specific focus on ship safety inspection programmes which have resulted in “nil” reported ship losses in SA waters.

Working with treasury, minister Peters said that DoT had been able to increase the mortgage ranking for financial institutions supporting the maritime sector – particularly, those that finance actual vessel purchases. Also the Transnet Port Regulator in Durban had brought greater certainty to port regulations with a new framework on which the 2015/16 tariff would be based.

Plans starting

oil rigIt was now proposed to establish a National Ship Register for registration of vessels worldwide; work with the private sector to develop initiatives and support the local ship building, ship repairs and maritime skills development.

On matters of policy and legislative framework and Operation Phakisa generally, minister Peters said that DoT would finalise a national maritime transport policy; a policy towards the cabotage (the illegal hire of transport for passengers or goods between two destinations in the same country) and coastal and international waters law.

Small  beginnings

The budget of R392m had been set aside for all maritime related programmes and projects, the minister said which was approved.

In the meantime, the minister has tabled the Merchant Shipping Amendment Bill which carries out very necessary amendments to the Merchant Shipping Act of 1951 to bring it line with South Africa’s Constitution.

The Amendment Bill also gives effect to the Maritime Labour Convention and the Work in FishingCoega harbour equip Convention both Conventions being adopted by UN’s ILO. International Labour Organisation.”  This aligns domestic legislation to global instruments ensuring global protection to the rights of seafarers and decent working and living conditions thus enabling South Africa to intervene in cases where foreign ships enter SA ports have contravened the rights of seafarers.”

The adoption of this legislation, its promoters say, will improve the operations and image of SA’s emerging maritime industry and is also an imperative in international trade.
Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/merchant-shipping-bills-on-oil-pollution-levies-approved/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/green-paper-nautical-limits/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/search-and-rescue-bill-to-set-up-search-centres/
 

 

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MPRDA Bill to be amended urgently

Some form of compromise….

coal miningIn referring back to Parliament the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill (MPRDA) and acknowledging in his State of Nation Address (SONA) that in its present form it could be damaging to South Africa’s investment climate, President Zuma and his cabinet have introduced more certainty to both the mining and oil and gas industries.

At least a year and a half delay was a guess if the suggestion that two replacement Bills were to be drafted separating mineral resources from oil and gas in the light of the fact that both have separate BEE charters.

Certainty needed

However, mineral resources minister Ngoako Ramatlhodi has agreed with mining companies and also the point put forward by Chamber of Mines that the best and fastest way forward to bring certainty to theRoughnecks wrestle pipe on a True Company oil drilling rig outside Watford industry would be to pass the Bill subject to amendments based on a new approach to the mining beneficiation issue and the matter of state “free carry” in any successful gas exploration.

Originally, on an issue raised both in submissions and by opposition parties and, even a couple of ANC MPs, the presidency has also agreed to doubts expressed whether, once signed, the MPRD Act after amendment would pass constitutional muster on the basis of the amending Bill’s passage through Parliament and the process adopted.

Section 79(1) of the Constitution empowers the President to return a Bill to Parliament for reconsideration if reservations about the constitutionality of the Bill prevail.

Mining land

Subsequently pointed out as a further reason for the Bill not beingtrad leaders signed, raised in a presidency statment issued by spokeperson Mac Maharaj, was a concern of cabinet that the Bill had to be processed through the Council of Traditional Leaders.

Parliament passed the Bill all in a rush at the end of March 2014 after much lobbying by ANC whips and despite warnings and constitutional challenges from many parties.  Nearly a year has passed since sending the proposals off for presidential assent.

The subject of the regulatory environment has not even been touched upon or has come up in the debate at this stage.

During the parliamentary recess both the Chamber of Mines and others have complained of sustained uncertainty in their industries and in the investment world.

Two issues emerged almost immediately when the President announced he was delaying his signature. The first issue was a hefty warning from mineral resources minister Ngoako Ramatlhodi who said “the implications for companies that did not meet BEE targets set out in the mining charter would be severe”, inferring that this might eventually affect the granting of mining licences. He raised, once again, the issue of employee shareholding.

“Developmental” metals pricing

Consequently, it still remains somewhat foggy what government policy was in instituting such clauses other than an overall ambition for the state to have more ownership of strategic resources in both industries and the drive by minister of trade and industry, Dr Rob Davies, to assist smaller manufacturing metals industries becoming more viable at the cost of larger industries, therefore creating more jobs, he said.

On the subject of BEE and the two different charters affected, all that has been said officially was a remark by minister Ramatlhodi “We have to satisfy ourselves that the Act meets our broader socio-economic development activities.”

The second issue to emerge after the announcement of the return of the MPRDA to Parliament was further mention by the department of energy of“Operation Phakisa”, the speed-up process as part of a co-ordination exercise with the oil and gas industry to reduce reliance on oil imports.

Fracking and renewables

On a separate issue, further statements by ministers with regard to fracking and speeding of delays in the IPP world with renewables has also emerged, overshadowed by the urgent need of an energy plan from the newly formed energy “war room”.

Whatever happens, both industries should be prepared for another round of public comment, hopefully in the first parliamentary period after the Budget…… minister of finance Nene notably mentioning nothing of nuclear interest in his budget speech.
Other articles in this category or as background
Energy War Room formed to meet crisis – Parly ReportSA
Mineral and Petroleum Resources Bill halted perhaps – ParlyReportSA
Medupi is the key to short term energy crisis – ParlyReportSA

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