Tag Archive | Nkosinathi Nhleko

Debate on Nkandla to intensify

Facts on Nkandla with MPs…..

effIn an internal parliamentary question paper, M Khawula, an MP of the IFP-KZN, asked for a reply in writing from the minister of police to his question, “Which structures, buildings and/or areas have been declared national key points and, secondly, what qualifies such to be declared national key points.”

He was not to know that minister of police, Nkosinathi Nhleko, would be forced out of blustering and show that president Zuma’s country homestead in the hills of KwaZulu-Natal, Nkandla, was indeed a national key point whereas, as illustrated by a newspaper in the parliamentary recess, nuclear experimental station, Pelindaba, north of Johannesburg, was not.

The reply in writing from the minister in the parliamentary replies of 19 September, in response to Nhleko’s question, was as follows, “To publish or to make known a list of all national key points would to a large extent defeat the purpose of the National Key Points Act 102 of 1980, namely the protection of such NKP’s. It is therefore not policy to provide such a list for public knowledge.”

When is a key point not one?

The minister added to the written note, “In terms of the National Key Points Act, section 2 deals with the declaration by the Minister of Police and I quote; “Declaration of any place or area as a National Key Point.

(1)  If it appears to the Minister at any time that any place or area is so important that its loss, damage, disruption or immobilization may prejudice the Republic, or whenever he considers it necessary or expedient for the safety of the Republic or in the public interest, he may declare that place or area a national key point.

(2)The owner of any place or area so declared a national key point shall forthwith be notified by written notice of such declaration.

That was the full extent of the reply from the minister.      Meanwhile in the recess, the opposition has written to the Speaker of the House, requesting that President Zuma be forced to respect the Constitution and answer questions from MPs in the National Assembly orally on a regular basis.

Weight of the law

settlement_law_justice_In the meanwhile during the recess, Judge Roland Sutherland in the Johannesburg high court  ordered the minister to hand over the list of national key points and national key point complexes in “the next thirty days” to the parties complaining, who were the Right2Know Campaign and the South African History Archive. Such was finally acceded to.

It is now understood from a statement made at the proceedings by the Mail and Guardian, who joined the action as a friend of the court and who were represented by advocate Matseleng Lekoane, that according to the Act, security guards are allowed to search and seize peoples’ belongings if the people were in a national key point. “They were also allowed to use guns to do this”, she said.

Adv. Lekoane argued that if this was the type of reaction that people, including journalists, might face, then they had the right to be prepared for it. “You need to know the status of a place so you can inform your conduct,” she argued.

Just so we know

The advocate representing Right2Know campaigners, Steven Budlender, had earlier complained that his client was only asking for the names of the places not the addresses.

In any case, he added, it would not make a difference to the country’s security if places like OR Tambo International Airport were publicly known as national key points.  This is because, Budlender said, the “dark forces” that the minister’s counsel feared would inflict harm on the country do not need to be told that a place is important. They would already know.

He was responding to argument made by counsel for the minister of police who said that revealing which buildings and places were NKPs would place national security at risk. “This does not stand up to logical scrutiny”, said Budlender.

Judge Sutherland said minister Nhleko’s refusal to release the list was unlawful and unconstitutional, and ordered the ministry to pay the legal costs.   The matter will no doubt be tabled for discussion in the next parliamentary session by which time it will be even clearer what the realtionship  between President Zuma and Parliament will be after his State of Nation Address.

Maybe appeal

However, debate at parliamentary committee working level will now be at a different level in the new session . The facts are there and what was fog in a bucket is now in the open for proper debate.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/cabinetpresidential/nkandla-debate-rekindled-da/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/cabinetpresidential/nkandla-ndp-argument-rages-go/

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New SA cabinet

Who for cabinet?…

NAAfter a week of intense speculation, with the swearing in of Members of Parliament, the election of the Speaker and Deputy Speaker of the National Assembly and the re-election of Jacob Zuma as President, followed by a gala inauguration process at Union Buildings, the political and financial world held its breath until the moment arose when the composition of the cabinet was announced over the weekend.

Also in the week previous, the first seating of the National Assembly marked noticeable changes in the hierarchy of the new governing alliance party. Strategic seating arrangements displayed the fact that Cyril Ramaphosa took the conspicuous seat allocated for the Deputy President.  In this sense, the mould was cast for a new period in South Africa’s political history at that point.

Ramphosa ZumaSince his defeat by Thabo Mbeki for status in the ANC, Cyril Ramaphosa, chairman of the Student Christian Movement, former secretary-general of the ANC and first secretary National Union of Mineworkers, was deeply involved in the negotiations that led to Nelson Mandela’s release. His involvement with South Africa’s political development is extensive.  He will now bring to cabinet decisions his twenty years of business experience gained whilst remaining as a political heavyweight in waiting.

Old faces

When the seating in Parliament took place, it appeared at the time that the incumbent minister of trade and industry seemed to haveRob+Davies maintained his influence within the ANC caucus and so it was to be.

tito mboweniWith the status-quo being to some extent maintained, one would therefore not expect any major changes or shifts in terms of policy, regulations and government position of matters related to business, the economy and international relations. The “behind the scenes” withdrawal of Tito Mboweni from parliamentary lists was significant since it had been clearly rumoured that he was tipped for the position of finance minister.

If the election of Baleka Mbete as Speaker and the massive influx of ANC cadres from Luthuli House to the National Assembly areMbete,Baleka swornin anything to go by, we can expect a more controlled environment in Parliament, particularly in the light of a reduced majority and the presence of the EEF.   Such tighter control will be evidenced in the nominations of chairpersons to the various Portfolio Committees.

Also in the past week, National Council of Provinces held its first seating. Unlike the National Assembly, 80% of the members of the NCOP are new to the House. Although this House does not particularly influence national, international and economic trends, one might expect significant changes in terms of committee positions on important issues.

Thandi Modise, former premier of the North West was elected chairperson of the NCOP and who is noted for her open-mindedness and approachability.

 The final choice

neneFinally, in a major cabinet reshuffle, President Zuma, announced his choice of ministers. To the surprise of most. he promoted deputy finance minister Nhlanhla Nene to finance minister, replacing minister Pravin Gordhan. Whether minister Nene was groomed for the position or minister Gordhan, who goes to governance and traditional affairs, is needed to sort out the finances and delivery disciplines in local government, remains to be seen. The appointments are nevertheless surprising.

The size of the cabinet apparently is not an issue with either the President or the ANC Alliance.    Clearly, the issues wracking the allianceanclogo are as important as economic issues and time will tell if the appointments are a consolidation of power or a compromise.

President Zuma also confirmed businessman Cyril Ramaphosa as his Deputy President. Considering Ramaphosa’s background and position, his appointment is expected to be welcomed by investors and the private sector.   As we speculated, Rob Davies is to maintain his position as minister of trade and industry, providing some continuity for the business world despite the fact that sparks never seem to fly in this area. However, DTI can be said to have had some success.

Mining and police

Mining minister, Susan Shabangu, who had been criticised for her handling of the strike in the platinum mines now in its fifth month, wasNgoako Ramatlhodi replaced by Ngoako Ramatlhodi, a former deputy minister in the prison service. Minister Shabangu goes to the new ministry of women, part of the Presidency.

radebeThe National Planning Commission and the ministry of performance, monitoring and evaluation have been merged and will be headed by former Justice Minister, Jeff Radebe, thus becoming part of the triad with the President and Deputy President. The total shake up of the security cluster, mining and energy portfolios could be set to have an significant impact on the five month strike in the platinum belt.

Left of centre

Mzwandile Masina has been appointed deputy minister of trade and industry. If there are to be “radical changes”, as President Zuma Mzwandile Masinaanticipated, this is where changes in B-BBEE might occur. Masina was formerly the national convenor of the ANC Youth League and was recently at the centre of a controversy when referring to NUMSA General Secretary, Irvin Jim, he used bad language.

Should Masina have any hold on policy and regulation, one could witness a significant shift in policy to the left, bearing in mind minister Rob Davies is a member of the SACP.

Electric shock

tina-joemattThe new minister of energy, Ms Tina Joemat-Pettersson, emerging from her fisheries complications and other difficult personal issues under investigation, will have her work cut out to get a grip on the energy picture and will have to rely, hopefully, on the many experts in the department of energy. This is before tackling the complicated issues facing the country in such areas as Eskom sustainability, the petroleum and fuels strategy and ISMO.

The new deputy minister of finance is Mcebisi Jonas, former MEC for economic development and environmental affairs of the Eastern Cape provincial government during which time it could be said that the Eastern Cape did not benefit from his term of office.
This is a disappointing appointment.

Madala Masusku, former Mpumalanga MEC for finance, is another provincial MEC who has made cabinet as deputy minister of economic development in a key position without too much experience.

Mr Policeman

Nkosinathi-NhlekoChief whip of the ANC, Nkosinathi Nhleko, previously deputy minister of labour, seems to have been rewarded for caucusing legislation through at the last minute in Parliament at the close of the fourth Parliament and becomes minister of police, whilst incumbent Nathi Mthethwa slips down to minister Paul Matashile’s position, Pallo Jordan’s old post, at arts and culture, Matashile disappearing from the hierarchy it appears, as did Jordan as well.

Also disappearing is Marthinus van Schalkwyk, whose ministry of tourism goes to Derek Hanekom, moving from the ministry of sciencehanekom and technology.

oliphantOn the labour front, experienced Mildred Oliphant stays where she is and continues to implement the four new labour laws thus providing some sort of continuity.

With so many changes, continuity in the short term is the issue.

Start up time

There is clearly going to be a time gap with so many shuffles and structural changes and it might be months before the whole impetus of the fifth government of South Africa gains traction to deal with the economic and delivery problems facing South Africa.

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