Tag Archive | national assembly

Parliament embroiled in state capture

State capture emerges as a fact  …

An impression might have been given recently that parliamentary meetings only occur as and when e-NCA cherry picks a meeting for the evening news on the subject of state capture.   Therefore, one might think, every parliamentary meeting is either about the SABC or Eskom, Transnet or Denel.   Nothing could further from the truth.

Although the perverse facts behind the carefully planned act of state capture, involving Bell Pottinger, the Gupta family, their friends and associates, the actual crime in parliamentary terms  is non-disclosure to Parliament committed by public servants in the name of the same “prominent” persons, plus lying and falsification in terms of an oath taken to serve the nation.

Parliament, as a structure, has remained untarnished as the second pillar of separated powers. It is the players who have broken faith.

Hundreds of meetings

This is not to say that truth has always been exercised in Parliament in the past nor to claim that from the President down to backbenchers, all have been unaware that fake news has been fielded in parliamentary meetings.  But what is heartening is that the parliamentary process has been an enormous hurdle for the crooked to overcome.

In any one of the four sessions a year, each roughly equating in timelines to the terms of a school calendar, there are some three to four hundred committee meetings in the National Assembly and National Council of Provinces.

The subject matters covered represent the activities of forty seven government departments, literally hundreds of SOEs and all legislation which is tabled for the Statute Book must be debated.   All this is conducted with two audiences. It is a daunting programme.

Standing out

But soon it was noticeable that it was the meetings on SOEs, particularly those with their own boards and where tender processes were involved, that there was  a common theme emerging.   In each case it was a matter of strategic decisions not being taken to Parliament for approval; balance sheets not squaring up to meet the requirements of the Auditor General and the sudden arrival of newly appointed board members with little or no experience of matters under discussion.

It all stood out like a sore thumb.   Meanwhile, investigative journalism was to become a major force in parliamentary affairs.

In fact it was the parliamentary system that began slowly to reject  the manipulative processes being fielded.  Many an MP started demanding investigative reports from Cabinet ministers with cross-party support;  parliamentary rules were enforced in order to restrain the passage of  mischievous legislation and the pointing of fingers and the use of the kind of language that is only allowed under  parliamentary privilege contributed to the wearing down of the cover-up machine.

To the rescue

Eventually, between the AmaBhungane team and the BDFM team and others such as City Press, investigative journalism saved the day.   It could then be seen in writing that many of the issues so slowly being uncovered in Parliament, where nobody could pierce the web of intrigue and see the picture in its entirety, the full story was beginning to  take shape.

The extent of the theft is still not known and still emerging are new players in the list of “prominent persons”.  There is also still no apparent follow up by either SAPS or the Hawks, nor matters acted upon by the National Prosecuting Authority.

Worse, many do not expect this to happen – so cynical has the taxpayer become and so deep are the criminal waters.  But, as the saying goes, “every dog has its day”.

In the engine room

Despite the bad publicity for Parliament and the institution itself being under fire as to whether or not Parliament is a reliable democratic tool, a good number of MPs, especially opposition members, have been slaving away.     This is despite the appointed Secretary to Parliament, Gengezi Mgidlana, going on “special leave” whilst allegations into his possible violations of the PMFA are investigated.

Mgidlana was appointed as “CEO” of Parliament by the Presidency.     His jaunts overseas accompanied by his wife are the subject of investigation and have been the cause of strike action by parliamentary staff for nearly a year, whilst their own pay packets are frozen.

This matter seems to have mirrored the very issues being debated in Parliament.   Fortunately and most responsibly, the strikes have been orchestrated so as to have little major effect on the parliamentary schedule

Top heavy

Meanwhile, despite the top guy being a passenger in his own system, notices are going out on time, the parliamentary schedule is available every morning and the regular staff are hard at it. Now is the time in the parliamentary diary when the April budget vote is activated; money is made available and departmental programmes initiated.    Hearings have been conducted on many important pieces of legislation.

There is an extraordinary team in Cape Town which runs Parliament, especially researchers and secretaries to committees.

Train smash

Added to this, if it was not enough, a normally busy schedule was further complicated by urgent meetings on poor governance; tribunal findings; briefings for new members of Cabinet and the fact that to match President Zuma’s ever-expanding Cabinet with appropriate government departments there were some fifty portfolio and select committees all being served by a reduced Parliamentary staff.

The extent to which corruption is embedded into government’s spending programme makes parliamentary oversight a difficult and lengthy task, especially when under performance or poor governance matters are involved.   It all reflects the times we live in. In one day alone there  is not enough parliamentary time for a whole range of public servants to be “in the dock” to answer questions on matters involving millions of rand.

No court of law

To be fair, it is often as difficult for the respondent to get around to answering as it is for parliamentarians to get to the truth.  When you know the boss is on the take, how does one answer?   Issues tend to go around in circles.

Sifting out the rhetoric when the truth is shrouded in political intrigue is no easy task in Parliament especially when people are frightened of losing their jobs.

As the millions of rand stolen turn into billions of rand during the early part of 2017 and parliamentary committees were introduced to new “acting” directors in charge of government funding, TV cameras popped up in all corners of the parliamentary precinct.    One was constantly tripping over metres and metres of black cable to caravan control rooms enabling the public to watch the latest saga.

Camera shy

At the same time, Parliament is clearly now being side-lined by members of the Cabinet or avoided by Directors General and this maybe because of this new found public form of entertainment of spotting the good guys and shaming the captured ones.

In the past, the abuse of parliamentary rules by the incumbent President used to be considered as country-boy innocence but now the position has changed.     As any election approaches, parliamentary rhetoric always descends into low grade babble in the National Assembly but this time it is very different.  there is a clear disconnect between Parliament and the President.

With the addition of the now infamous “white minority capital” campaign to the debate, orchestrated ostensibly as we now know from London (as probably was the over employed expression of “radical economic transformation”) most of the forty-seven ministers and deputy ministers hammered out the same slogans in their budget vote speeches 9r at any given opportunity to speak, as if orchestrated.

Looking back: 2nd session

Going back to the beginning of 2016/7, Parliament has ploughed through the Nkandla mess; the SABC crisis; the Eskom governance exposures; the troubles at SAA; the failures and manipulations at Denel; crookery at Transnet; the PRASA scandals and in the losses at PetroSA, the latter being just sheer bad management it seems driven by political desire.

All of this has involved a lot of committee time far better spent on enlightening issues to assist the economy and create jobs. The “blame game” simply led to a jungle of write offs with no explanations but, suddenly, an ill-timed series of cabinet re-shuffles rattled a hundred cages.

D-day

Friday, March 31, 2017 will always be remembered following a period of stun grenades and parliamentary brawling in the House as President Zuma announced yet another set of choices to make up his Cabinet.  In committee meetings, in no less than eight portfolios, new or changed Ministers and Deputy Ministers appeared at meetings with little background.

The second session of the 2017 Parliament had this extraordinary start and on it ending, the arrival of the Gupta emails has now confirmed and named many involved in the whole issue of truthful depositions before Parliament.  No doubt a lot more shocks are yet to come.

The next session of Parliament will represent one of the arenas where the gladiatorial challenge will be played out on state capture together with the battle to avoid fusion in the separation of powers.

It is to be hoped that spring at the end of the third session will herald more than just another summer.

 

Previous articles on category subject
Zuma vs Parliament – ParlyReportSA
Parliament awaits to hear from Cabinet – ParlyReportSA
Parliament goes into Easter recess – ParlyReportSA

Posted in cabinet, Cabinet,Presidential, Energy, Finance, economic, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Security,police,defence, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament closes on sour note

Oversight role threatened…..

editorial…..

We have to admit it was not a happy Parliament that closed on 25 May 2016. Whilst we try to ignore newspaper parliament mandela statuescandals and listen to the more serious debate of those trying to get things right in the interests of the country, it was indeed a troubled Parliament that went into recess.

We have delayed our report to catch the last of the meetings before the election period. Usually, where there is a forthcoming election, whether national or provincial, there are many unreasonable statements from politicians. However, it seems that this time, there are lot more issues and certainly a lot more abrasive statements than usual.

Politics aside

Many such matters have involved the question of relationships with Parliament – the institution that is supposed to stand apart, like the judicial, from political machinations. Separation of these powers is critical to the process of halting a democracy from becoming a dictatorship, so it becomes important not to enter this space. However, quite clearly some members of the Cabinet, even perhaps the Presidency, are trying to by-pass Parliament on the question of oversight.

Although this is strongly denied on every occasion when the subject comes up, it becomes more and more difficult to tell whether government officials are having pressure applied on them when it comes to telling the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth to Parliament.

Hence, also it is difficult to discern true government policy in the long term as distinct from Cabinet putting out fires in the short term. We will be glad when this period in South African politics comes to an end, which hopefully it will.

Parliament and its system

Mbete,Baleka sworninIt would seem to us, a fact which is supported by most commentators, that the party list system is one of the culprits in this area – a system a whereby a member of Parliament stays in service, complete with salary and pension, according to his or her adjudged service to the cause.

Secondly, all directors general of government departments are, in most cases, party appointments and currently every chairperson of every committee in Parliament is a member of the ANC Alliance. It is the integrity of that person, therefore, that matters and this, we afraid to say, seems not to be coming through from the Cabinet. Every country gets the government they deserve (Joseph de Maistre).

All is not as at it appears

It came as a shock to many to learn that what had been listened to in Parliament, such as statements and presentations from directors general and CEOs of utilities or SOEs representing massive structures such as Eskom, PetroSA, Central Energy Fund, Police Services, Defence (and even PIC), that all was not quite, shall we say, totally accurate – even in expensive powerpoint presentations and in long convoluted answers to the Auditor General. The trend has been a painful experience to observe.

The cowboys, such as Lucky Montana of PRASA – now disgraced, were relatively easy to spot. Quite clearly his parliamentary reports were dubious and the presentations he made were an attempt to cover up foolish mistakes and bad management but there had remained a feeling of enthusiasm to succeed in his case. Just somebody in charge who shouldn’t have been.

However, in the case of “pressure coming from the top”, there are the odd stories continually emanating from the energy debate and matters related. These are disquieting, as are matters relating to broadband allocation, the aviation industry and land reform coupled with traditional affairs and matters related to expropriation.

Divided

Aside from the unfortunate chaos in the National Assembly debates, meetings which we attend occasionallyparliament 6 only from a business viewpoint – usually budget issues, the evident atmosphere of dissonance between Cabinet and Treasury is clearly affecting and hindering the parliamentary oversight role and translating itself down to the parliamentary working portfolio committees.

A poor relationship with Treasury badly affects the “engine room” of Parliament and makes a mockery of financial control.

We can only attend, make précis on what is said and report without opinion but we can say, quite honestly in our editorial, that currently we are not impressed by the seemingly cowed body language of the public service on certain issues. Witness the decisions on the output of the SABC and although we do not report on this as it bears no business brief, it somehow manifests a Cabinet gone wrong.

We shall continue to be watchful, particularly in the area of new legislation that affects business and declared changes in government policy.

Previous articles on category subject
Parliament under siege – ParlyReportSA
Shedding light on Eskom – ParlyReportSA
PRASA gets its rail commuter plan started – ParlyReport

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, earlier editorials, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts0 Comments

Parliament: National Assembly traffic jam

editorial…….

Massive public service vs National Assembly…..

During the last few weeks, the sheer volume of meetings in the National Assembly of Parliament to consider eachnational assembly members government departmental budget vote and each of the departmental five-year strategic plans has been overwhelming. Little of legislative consequence emerges during such a period each year, other than the tabling of technocrat Bills rather than important policy making legislation.

Sadly to say, not too much attention is paid by the media to any of these meetings. Big plans, impressive targets, promises to overhaul this, that and the other. Most working journalists of experience have seen it all before and mostly they try to get statements on issues from either the Minister or Deputy Minister beforehand.

Time is of the essence for all. But why is this period of the parliamentary diary so extraordinarily busy?

Traffic jam in Parliament

There is unfortunately a simple answer. With too many people trying to do too much in limited government hours, the resulting traffic jam results from the fact that South Africa has probably one of the largest government structures per head of population in the world, if not the largest. If it was one of the best, as far as delivery was concerned, probably this might be acceptable but sadly it isn’t and most, both locally and internationally, know it.

unionbldgsIn the fight that has now started to prune costs, moving Parliament from Cape Town to Pretoria has been suggested on the basis that this might save considerable airfare costs, time spent sitting in aircraft and train seats when the country needs one’s administrative time in the office and pointless time spent on hotel accommodation honing up on the next day’s parliamentary presentation.

However, all of this is only a manifestation of the real problem and it does not answer the question of why Parliament is so busy at this time of year.

Odious comparisons

Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan is obviously in an extremely embarrassing position. He must realize himself that the Cabinet to which he belongs is arguably one the largest in the world evidenced by the fact that whilst there are thirty-five very highly paid ministers in the South African Cabinet, the USA has a “cabinet” of sixteen. China pushes it a bit with twenty-five and India manages one of the biggest populations in the world with twenty-three.

It all becomes slightly ludicrous when an additional thirty-seven Deputy Ministers are weighed in to Team South Africa.

Wrong ratio

Down the line and aside from the cost of running all these ministries, the thirty-five departments belonging toparliament mandela statue these Ministers, accompanied by some seventeen of the larger SOEs, must all report to a totally disproportionate number of MPs in Parliament, both in the portfolio committees in the National Assembly and the select committees in the NCOP.

Hence the parliamentary traffic jam at this time of year. All this at the cost of quality oversight (the job of Parliament) and the slowing down of urgently needed legislation. Meanwhile, the number of MPs is governed by the Constitution. The number of cabinet ministers and departments (and consequently the ballooning public service) is governed by the President.

The answer to the parliamentary traffic jam problem and the imperilled and much-needed cost saving exercise in terms of the Budget is therefore really a complete no-brainer.
Previous articles on category subject
The big SA cabinet crunch – ParlyReportSA
Special cabinet statement might correct damage to SA – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, earlier editorials, Facebook and Twitter, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Public utilities0 Comments

EFF: only part of the problem

Editorial……

EFF adding to image problem…

EFF 2The sight of brawls in any Parliament around the world evokes a picture of a breakdown in society and it naturally downgrades business and investor confidence. To not comment upon the matter as parliamentary monitors would be like ignoring the last bus on a rainy night. The disruption is there and it is as large as life.

It is no good ignoring it; it has happened and further, on a number of occasions, meetings have had to be abandoned in the National Assembly.  However, it is important to add that it is not a question of the parliamentary system breaking down but being abused.

Keeping order

It is a sad moment but maybe a good thing to bring in a “parliamentary guard” to keep order so as not to have SAPS on standby for the Speaker to gain order. For example, the Vatican, which also has a separation of power ruling, has its own guard.  

In this case, however, introducing official parliamentary “bouncers” so that all parliamentarians can get a fair hearing is rather like re-introducing the cane at school so that all students get a fair education.  So be it. It seems this has to be the case

What Constitution?

Regretfully, if one looks at the bigger picture, this is not a parliamentary issue but part of a far bigger constitutional issue that wracks the country. An “extra-parliamentary” issue therefore.

Meanwhile, it has to be explained, time and time again, that it is at portfolio committee and select committee level in both the National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces, that the real work is done – whether the outcome pleases business and industry or not.   All the committees have an ANC Alliance majority but the standard of debate is remarkably high and if something is “bulldozed” through, it quite often seems to go wrong.

Order, order, order

maceIf anybody has watched parliamentary question time, or PMQ, in the British Houses of Parliament one realizes the complete lack of value of attending such Upper House meetings for the record. It is a place of political posturing and to vote. Almost entertainment in the case of PMQ.

So it is with the National Assembly but it was interesting to watch the Mace being recovered in true parliamentary style when debate failed, something not appreciated by the 6% of MPs behaving like hooligans with no wish to follow procedure. There is hope.

parly with mace

 

 

Posted in earlier editorials, Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn0 Comments

Minister Nene maps survival route

Not so merry Christmas….

Editorial……

candlesWithout wishing to put a dampener on festive arrangements, the last few weeks of the closing parliamentary session, which included the medium term budget from minister Nene, have seen a difficult period, not in the least caused by fiascos in the National Assembly with the EFF. Baiting President Zuma, whatever the reason, has nothing to do with running a country.

Such hooligan behaviour completely demeans the status of Parliament but worse, it also denigrates all the real work that is going on the engine room of Parliament, the working committees.  Some observers are quietly happy that the ANC Alliance is being called to account on certain matters but the overall effect has been to take South Africa perceptually into dangerous waters.

Nkandla unpleasant diversion

The Nkandla issue has clearly damaged the political standing of Parliament as well as giving the media a field day, or a field month as the case turned out to be.  But in the parliamentary portfolio, ad hoc, finance standing and NCOP select committees, the work has gone on and it has been a busy and difficult period as a result of the necessity to approve finance minister Nene’s medium term budget.

Difficult because some fifty utilities, government departments and section nine companies had to declare their objectives, say how things were going and reflect upon the auditor general’s findings on each of them.   Difficult because cabinet statements are really giving no true direction on questions being asked every day in Parliament.   Difficult because it is still the first year of a new Parliament and everything is running late with new MPs.

Whilst the auditor general (AG) may have declared that government departments only received 15% unqualified reports, the balance of 85% are qualified to some degree by the AG.  A learning process. This means the working committees have seen it, everyone knows about it and the system works. This is the difference between weekend newspaper reporting and monitoring. It is not just a question of putting a positive spin on things but recognising that there is, indeed, a force working for morality and financial correctness.

Focus is on medium term budget

Nevertheless, minister Nene’s budget speech was still the key issue of the last month, not Nkandla as the perception might be.  Nene’s remarks that “business is a key area in fostering the ideal that the NDP becomes a reality” had the all too familiar ring of what Alec Erwin had to say twenty years ago when the ANC promised private and public partnerships on energy matters. Nothing happened of course, the ANC embarking upon ten years of infrastructure inactivity.

In fact major private sector participation in the country’s development was totally halted at that point and has since never really got going.

When is when?

Now the question is being asked once again as to whether the government will actually ever embark upon real hard core private/public investments, other than dishing out a few solar and wind power projects. This is the question being asked by opposition MPs in Parliament at working committee level, ignoring for the moment the embarrassing fracas upstairs in the National Assembly.

It is difficult to imagine in parliamentary terms that minister Rob Davies, minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson, minister Jeff Radebe, minister Lindiwe Sisulu and minister Lynne Brown will ever truly understand the tenets, motivations and passion that drive businesses, even perhaps the President himself.  South Africa suffers from bad politicians, not necessarily bad government.

Circus with no ringmaster

What the presidential national planning commission is actually saying to the cabinet is an issue that cannot be guessed at by anybody at this stage, such private messages certainly not being conveyed in Parliamentary papers. In fact nobody seems to be talking, the DA having as little knowledge as half the SA cabinet, it appears.

Consequently minister Nene’s hopes appear somewhat lame at this stage. To be positive however, it may be that as next year’s parliamentary oversight programme on service delivery targets gains momentum, as it has already, accompanied with all the political pain that will occur if voters remain dissatisfied, political reality may force the governing party to at last start walking the talk that minister Nene espouses.

Posted in cabinet, Cabinet,Presidential, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Land,Agriculture, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament votes on 2014 budget

Editorial _

Men and women at work…

Parliament  is currently a place of learning, particularly bearing in mind the 2014 budget is the first oversight task.   With so many new parliamentarians and newly re-structured committees with new chairpersons, insofar as learning is concerned,  it is more than just simply a new school term but a new school term in a new school.

As in the past, it will be a little time before things settle down and MPs gather enough understanding to perform the role with which they are entrusted; the role of oversight.

Most are savvy enough to understand the separation of powers even though party whips can become quite intimidating at times.  In any case, the system soon sorts out those with nothing useful to say and those with critical and questioning minds.

Approving the budget

The learning curve is steep. Many have been thrust straight into a committee programme where the task of each committee is to approve the national budget allocated to each of the many government departments according to their performance for the last five years. All of this departmental knowledge MPs have to read up on, study their plans for the next five years and listen to the same departments giving briefings presented at working committee level.  This is  currently where Parliament is.

To not contribute and not to perform is a quick trip to political oblivion.

MPs must also understand the views expressed of the auditors general on the previous year’s financial performances of the particular department and of state utilities; how the plans interlock, or don’t interlock properly, into a cluster of associated departments; a fair idea of what the presidential ministry of performance, monitoring and evaluation thinks of them and the party line on the issues of the day dealt with by the particular section of state machinery.

At this stage in the new Parliament the whole question of current legislation in process has probably not arisen but shortly, for many MPs, it will just be a case of listening and absorbing viewpoints, particularly of those who drafted the legislation and why they did.

Implementation of NDP

Two important things are therefore happening at the moment. Each government is justifying not only its past performance but committing itself to a plan with targets for the next five years together with strategies for a longer term and medium and long terms budgets. Secondly, they will learn what legislation is in draft and in the pipeline and the policy reasons for such legislation.

Consequently, question time in debate is critical and whilst questions from MPs can range from probing enquiries to the frankly banal, the change is refreshing. Witness minister Hanekom’s turnaround on immigration visas; the cabinet turn around on independent power producers; and on the affirmation of nuclear power in the energy mix and the sending back of the improbable Gender Equality Bill – all as examples of changes in thinking.

More interesting are the questions being asked by new MPs. Such as the new ANC energy committee member when she asked candidly of the DG for clean energy whether he thought all the “greening” regulations and air quality capital costs might be scaring off investors. Or the EFF MP who demanded a list of all Eskom blackouts and the reasons for the interruption in service.

Where it happens

To a certain extent the questions might appear naïve but a more candid and new perspective does no harm.  The parliamentary system still remains the crucible of political policy and legislative debate, despite the undermining effect that can take place with a heavily weighted political opinion coming from a strong political majority.    Nevertheless, South Africa is protected by one of the strongest constitutions in the world and the parliamentary process fortunately basks in its strong light.

Once the budget vote is debated, the Appropriations Bill – a section 77 money Bill protected from amendment by any party but Treasury by the same Constitution – Parliament’s attention will move towards the legislative landscape, hopefully tackling with as much vigour some of more the contentious issues facing the country.

Ends

 

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

SA Budget – 2012/3

Having announced that South African finances were “in good health”, a silence echoed around the National Assembly debating chamber as finance minister Pravin Gordhan announced in this year’s budget statement a general fuel levy on petrol and diesel, which will go up on April 4 by 20 cents and the fact that the RAF levy would go to 88 cents, i.e. up by 8 cents.

A levy on generated electricity from non-renewable sources will increase by 1 cent per kWh from July and this will replace current energy efficiency initiatives.

Again, as per last year, Minister Gordhan has proposed personal income tax relief, this year amounting to R9.5bn. A further tax credit for contributions to medical schemes is to be introduced, with reform to tax treatment of contributions being planned.

The introduction of short and medium term savings exemption programmes is to be introduced and the capital gains tax for individuals goes to 33.3% from March 1 and for companies to 66.6%.

A number of measures are to be introduced to improve the corporate tax environment but ways to finance the forthcoming National Health Insurance programme have to be found, minister Gorhan said, and this could include an increase in VAT, a payroll tax or a surcharge on general tax.

However a grant would suffice in the meanwhile until 2014 when a workable system would have to be found  to provide” an equitable system of health coverage for all South Africans”.

Commentators, we see, have already discounted a possible VAT increase as politically dangerous for the ANC, pointing to a general payroll increase during the early stages at 0.5%, other government-watchers noting that such a welfare programme is likely to be introduced on a province-by-province basis in line with the hospitalisation infrastructure programme.

The minister clearly indicated that a carbon tax was to be introduced.

A budget deficit of 4.6% of GDP, with government debt reaching R1.5 trillion by 2014/5, was announced by the minister.

Considerable additional investments are to be put into health and education with, for example, a further R850m for additional university infrastructure and R426m for tertiary hospitals, plus R450m for nursing colleges.  R9.5bn is to be provided for investment incentives and the development of SEZ programmes, with R6.2bn to be spent on job creation.  R4bn is specially going to PRASA for passenger coaches (refer our post), with R4.7bn for solar water geysers; R1.8bn on water infrastructure and R3.9bn on informal settlement upgrading.

Total spending on infrastructure and similar developmental issues was expected to reach R1.05 trillion this coming year, rising to R1.15 trillion next year.

Posted in BEE, Cabinet,Presidential, Communications, Education, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Justice, constitutional, Labour, Land,Agriculture, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry, Transport, Uncategorized0 Comments

President Zuma calls for 2012 as year of infrastructure

President Zuma, speaking during his state of the nation address in Parliament, declared 2012 to be the year of infrastructure development and that a presidential infrastructure coordinating commission (PICC) is to be set up in September, as planned in a cabinet lekgotla last July, to implement the plan.

Five major projects have been identified by state owned enterprises as well as involving national, provincial and local government departments.

  • Rail, road & water projects in Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West provinces
  • Durban-Free State-Gauteng industrial corridor-including reducing port charges
  • South eastern node, including a dam on the Umzimvubu River
  • Water, roads, rail & electricity infrastructure development in the North West
  • West coast developments & expansion of iron ore line Sishen /Saldanha Bay

President Zuma said the plan would also contribute towards industrialisation, skills development and job creation and that a summit would be called for potential investors and social partners to interact on the possibilities of participating.

He added that a presidential infrastructure summit will be held where potential investors and social partners can interact with government on the plan.  Hospitals and nurses’ homes would also be refurbished as part of preparations for the national health insurance system and new universities built in Mpumalanga and Northern Cape.

On other legislative issues, he promised conclusion of the long outstanding matter of labour broking and changes to labour law amendment bills sitting at the moment with NEDLAC; a Women Empowerment and Gender Equality Bill in draft and matters regarding the land reform process, particularly with regard to re-writing  the willing buyer – willing seller process. Traditional affairs matters, he said, also had to be dealt with in this regard.

Costs of the infrastructure plan and how this will come about as a financial plan, are fleshed out in the Budget from minister of finance, Pravin Gordhan, presented subsequently on 22 February.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Finance, economic, Labour, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Uncategorized0 Comments


This website is Archival

If you want your publications as they come from Parliament please contact ParlyReportSA directly. All information on this site is posted two weeks after client alert reports sent out.

Upcoming Articles

  1. MPRDA : Shale gas developers not satisfied
  2. Environmental Bill changes EIAs
  3. Parliament thrashes out debt relief Bill
  4. Border Mangement Bill grinds through Parliament
  5. BUSA, farmers, COSATU give no support to sugar tax

Earlier Editorials

Earlier Stories

  • Anti Corruption Unit overwhelmed

    Focus on top down elements of patronage  ….editorial….As Parliament went into short recess, the Anti-Corruption Unit, the combined team made up of SARS, Hawks, the National Prosecuting Authority and Justice Department, divulged […]

  • PIC comes under pressure to disclose

    Unlisted investments of PIC queried…. When asked for information on how the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) had invested its funds, Dr  Daniel Matjila, Chief Executive Officer, told parliamentarians that the most […]

  • International Arbitration Bill to replace BITs

    Arbitration Bill gets SA in line with UNCTRAL ….. The tabling of the International Arbitration Bill in Parliament will see ‘normalisation’ on a number of issues regarding arbitration between foreign companies […]

  • Parliament rattled by Sizani departure

    Closed ranks on Sizani resignation….. As South Africa struggles with the backlash of having had three finance ministers rotated in four days and news echoes around the parliamentary precinct that […]

  • Protected Disclosures Bill: employer to be involved

    New Protected Disclosures Bill ups protection…. sent to clients 21 January……The Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Affairs will shortly be debating the recently tabled Protected Disclosures Amendment Bill which proposes a duty […]