Tag Archive | MPRDA

Parliament may see delays on Mining Bill

Mining and petroleum bill to hit snags

Overwhelmingly evident is the cloud hanging over the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill (MPRDA), linked inextricably to a troubled Mining Charter, some movement on the MPRDA being necessary to restore stability to the mining industry in the form of legislative clarity.

Legislative clarity will also allow the petroleum and gas industry to hopefully go into a development phase.  Here the players need an equal playing field, the State in this case getting a free stake possibly at 20% but paying no development costs since the State now has ownership of the resources.

Free lunches

There is one further possible hurdle on the horizon.      Aside from issues surrounding the Charter, which is technically a non-parliamentary issue, the application of Parliamentary Rules regarding the great number of changes that are being made to the Bill raise procedural issues.

It is indeed a very different Bill to that which was voted through Parliament earlier and passed by the National Assembly.

For the moment, now that provincial opinion on the more recent changes to the MPRDA have been returned,  the provinces each having voted and recorded their nine mandates on the subject, the idea is that the Bill can then finally be returned to the Presidency, possibly via the NA Committee to lodge the changes.

First things first

There is a sense emerging that the offshore gas industry is a little happier with the free carry proposals but on the other side of negotiations it appears, from the media, that the Chamber of Mines is struggling to find common ground with Minister Zwane on the Mining Charter, referred to in the MPRDA but not legislatively part of it.

It is difficult to imagine any Mining and Petroleum Resources Development Act, as amended, being in force without an agreed and new Mining Charter in place. However,  developments in this area will have to be watched.

Last in queue

In the list of Bills before Parliament the MPRDA has been listed last (and therefore the longest under debate) for nearly three years, except for a short period when it went to the President.   This reflects the long tussle involved.

The four major hindrances were the extended negotiations with the offshore petroleum industry on the free carry issue; the fact that President Zuma returned the Bill approved unsigned insisting that it be considered by all nine provinces; issues surrounding what the Minister has defined as “strategic minerals”; the thorny question of mineral beneficiation and the completion of the mining charter, to which the MPRDA refers but remains not incorporated.

Next process

Many more issues have still to be debated, whilst the basic parameters will have to come to a head on the parliamentary “rules of the game” regarding the passage of the legislation itself.    Meanwhile, NCOP hearings on the Bill have been scheduled for the last two weeks of June 2017.

Throughout, the “elephant in the room” for the mining industry has remained the Charter itself which Minister Zwane has stated will be “the most revolutionary Charter ever produced.”

Possible slow down

Meanwhile on the MPRDA, Opposition members will no doubt study closely the Rules of Parliament which state, as was the case with the FICA Bill, that if a Bill is returned unsigned then only the issues for which the Bill was returned may be altered and then only once.

However, unlike the FICA Bill which was returned on the basis of one issue, that of unwarranted searches the MPRDA Bill was returned on the basis of lack of consultation with the provinces.

To amplify, if the President only returned the Bill on the basis that the NCOP and National House of Traditional Leaders had not been consulted, it may be a contested issue as to whether the Bill will be challenged under these Rules. This is a legal issue.

The Legal Resources Centre is quoted as being interested in such a challenge.

Looking ahead

For years, it has been the view of many that both industries that each should have its own “MPRDA”, especially in the light of the fact that both have their own specific and very different Charters.

Whilst crude oil, subsequently refined to petroleum and gas, are certainly natural resources now owned by the State, theoretically the only resources that are ‘mineral’ are those which have a crystalline molecular structure and are “mined”.     This would naturally exclude extracted crude oil and gas.

Two is not one

Consequently, both industries, which fall under two government departments and which are distinctively different from one another, have historically been under one piece of legislation governing all geological resources.

This difference between the two industries is expressed in many ways.   The petroleum industry is centred around its refineries, very much technical industries with ‘upstream’ components in importation and exploration and ‘downstream’ interests  involving distribution, retailing and property interests. Their product is very directly linked to the cost of doing business and the cost of living.

Meanwhile, the mining industry is essentially involved in extraction with massive labour factors, high capital costs, sophisticated export involvements and beneficiation.  Its product is closely linked to the survival of industry in general and is directly linked to GDP.

Legislatively, therefore, one garment certainly does not fit all  –  despite each industry having its own charter.  Inevitably separate legislation will have to be developed but such changes are seen as being down down the road for the moment.

Damaging delays 

Whatever route the Bill now takes in Parliament, any challenge to its progress will be particularly frustrating for investors if there are more delays.    Those issues mainly arise in the mining sector where far more is at stake and consequently rating agencies are flagging Minister Zwane’s actions.  The gas exploration industry is clearly tired of waiting.

The results of three days of parliamentary hearings on the Bill, which have included some side issues such as Shell SA on the future of shale gas and any demands from the House of Traditional Leaders, should prove interesting.

The major issue remains as to what is government policy is on the whole particularly regarding labour  as distinct from just Cabinet ambitions for BEE participation percentages.

Next stages

Most attention will now fall upon the complementary non-legislative document, the Mining Charter, despite the unclear parliamentary situation.   Following the public hearings, the NCOP Select Committee will summate these meetings and the relevant departments will respond over the following days.

Possibly, at some stage, Minister Zwane will address Parliament on the issue to clarify the situation of government’s view and relevant comment on the Bill will also no doubt arise from media briefings by the Ministry on both subjects. For the moment, much of the issue will be dictated by events outside of Parliament.

Previous articles on category subject
MPRDA Bill returned to National House of Leaders – ParlyReportSA
MPRDA Bill to be amended urgently – ParlyReportSA
MPRDA Bill brings changes in BEE and exploration rights – ParlyReportSA
Mineral and Petroleum Resources Bill halted perhaps – ParlyReportSA

Posted in BEE, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Labour, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament goes into Easter recess

….editorial….

Now you see it, now you don’t

……    It has now become almost impossible to avoid the use of the time-honoured expression “politics aside” when following legislative developments in Parliament.

The body politic affects most things all the time – from drafting a Bill to a
government media briefing, from debating a departmental investigation to public hearings on new legislation. It all involves the ideology of who is in charge.

In fact, the Oxford Dictionary describes “politics’ as follows: the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate between parties having power.

From this one can see how politics will always continue to dominate government policy, legislation, and the parliamentary process, since in the end all permeates down from Cabinet decisions. That’s the way it works. Until of course the moment occurs that corruption, cronyism and state capture dictate the parliamentary process itself.

Then the fine line between policy and politics gets rather tacky. Shady motives such as personal gain or protection from the law become evident. What started out as well-meaning policy can get warped by politics and the passage of legislation becomes erratic, if not unconstitutional.

Coded language

Clearly there are now two Cabinets in South Africa. Also, there are various government departments that tend to follow one faction or another, all reporting to their respective portfolio committees. Of these, some seem to adhere to parliamentary rules on oversight and others seem to be less deep in their probing.

This explains why Jackson Mthembu, Chief ANC Party Whip who conveys ANC messages to the party loyal in Parliament, plays such a critical and pivotal role.

When it becomes ‘a given’ that those in control willfully use the top-down structure to their advantage and become joined at the hip with the party list system, then the decision to follow the orders of the party begin to involve a fear of being unable to pay the school fees or pay the lease on the recently acquired BMW.

It is the party list system that is our constitutional blind spot. It encourages cronyism, defined once again in the Oxford Dictionary as: the appointment of friends and associates to positions of authority, without proper regard to their qualifications.

No change

When this aberration of the democratic process occurs on a regular basis, the expression “politics aside” seems to come back into usage. This time for a different reason.

Understandably, one cannot go through the whole laborious process in every debate and with every turn of inexplicable behaviour explaining the manipulation of facts or non-disclosure of relevant information; the influence that certain business persons have upon policy decisions; or the behaviour of state department heads who seems oblivious of their duties.

Therefore politically-correct shortcuts become necessary in order that one’s own opinion is not involved. It’s a sort of coded language that straight up and down people use as a replacement for the real thing.

So, politics aside, President Zuma is still holding up the Financial Intelligence Centre Bill to combat money laundering. Politics aside, Minister of Mining, Mosebenzi Zwane, is still attempting to get fifty-six changes adopted under the already approved Mineral and Petroleum Resources Amendment Bill and, politics aside, the Expropriation Bill is back with Parliament once again.

The good news

Far more interesting is that, politics aside, the separation of powers is still working to a greater or lesser degree; the legislative process is still being respected by most and irritating some; and the Constitutional Court is still out there as our standard bearer, minus a number of computers.

 

…. and, politics aside, we could be doing so much better.

editorial.... parlyreportsa....27 march 2017

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Madonsela: state capture and corruption…

says, Zuma involved in state capture.. 

editorial.. To those who know, the silence after a bomb goes off is quite uncanny. Like the state capture bomb. Even birdsongthuli-madonsela-2 ceases and the world seems to halt for a few seconds.  Then as things start up again, people seem to gabble. Everybody is rushing about. Life starts up but the noise seems incredible, if you can hear at all that is.   Following this comes the sickening realization that there might be a second bomb.   One seems helpless.

So it was when the Public Protector’s Report on State Capture was released.   Most had the feeling that to see in writing upon the frontispiece the words “state capture” was quite surreal.   Up until then it was rumour; an “alleged” idea; something that was always “strongly denied”; certainly, shady but in any case, difficult to prove… but it certainly shouldn’t happen in our backyard anyway.

Truth must out

thuli-encaThen the bombshell report was released.  The world seemed to halt in silence whilst its 355 pages were digested. Then came the voices, mostly loud and some quite vociferous.  Some demanded more proof; some demanded immediate retribution. Many asked for the President to step down, following which was a festival of interviews on e-NCA.    Meanwhile, in Parliament the corridors went quiet.   Like a phoney war.

Rewind

Whether there is a second bomb in the form of the Hawks and the NPA again charging Minister Pravin Gordhan is purely conjecture at this stage.   It is part of a process that Parliament is not privy to.   Parliamentarians must just watch these parties go about their business, unfortunately at the expense of a jittery investment market.

What we do know is that all judicial and parliamentary processes are painfully slow and this iscropped-sa-parliament-2.jpg as it must be.   Witness the complaints if a Bill is rushed or “hammered” through Parliament.  It rarely works when carried out at speed and the process is exposed for its faults.

The law may be an ass at times and very laborious but it is there to fight corruption.  To eventually win a case against such a difficult-to-prove crime may take time but it is devastatingly successful when achieved.

However, the name Gupta is not responsible for everything.   Some of unpleasant exposures, especially in the energy field, are the result of massive incompetence rather than a temptation of financial gain.

Taking time

In ParlyReportSA, now with clients, we detail four painfully long processes which eventually will result in what may not be liked by some but have been correctly subjected to the slow but democratic procedure of Parliament – the MPRDA Bill; the investigation into the tina-joemattIkwhezi R14.5bn loss; the sale of South Africa’s strategic oil reserves; and how the mini-budget of Minister Pravin Gordhan has evaded the claws of state capture.

Our constitutional, and therefore our parliamentary system which is integrated into it, is subject to a clause which states that the president of the country is the person who is elected as the president of the ruling party’s National Executive.    This outcome only changes if that person is found guilty of breaking the law or his and her oath of office. For this outcome to be proven can take much time.

Patience a virtue

Gratifyingly also, amongst many outstanding court procedures underway, the arduous parliamentary and legislative process to ensure a recalcitrant President gets around to signing the FICA Bill, is underway.

His signature is needed in order that the countrzuma1y can meet international banking obligations and comply with money-laundering disclosure requirements. The fact that the President has not signed it, as was put before him by Parliament and has provided no reason for the apparent lack of inertia to do so, speaks volumes.  Probably a case for personal privacy will be tabled by his defence team, if he gets to need one.

Delaying tactics

Either the President in this instance will waste taxpayer’s money with a long drawn out case or be advised to withdraw, as has been his practice up until now, by acceding at the last minute and will have signed or be told to.

zwaneHe and his associates know that this Bill is a critical tool in the fight against illegal transfers of funds by “prominent persons”.  Minister Zwane’s fight with the banking sector is an unnecessary sideshow connected to this process. More becomes evident in the media , day by day, of this gentleman’s shady dealings.

Dark forces

Another fight calling for patience and now being unearthed is the level of corruption within intelligence services, Hawks and the NPA.  Hopefully, this is not as deep as the relationship that Robert Mugabe had with Nicolae Ceaușescu of Hungary, based on which he built his CIO and followed the advice gained from his training with Nangking Military Academy.

hawks logoHopefully also, with the NPA, Hawks and other major undercover government departments, only such matters as  graft involving as rhino trade and state capture bribes are the tools of trade involved and the aim remains simply self-enrichment.

Hope springs

The “goodies” in South Africa have much to undertake in order to beat the “baddies”, not helped by senior ANC officials not getting off the fence for fear of being demoted on the party list and losing their pensions.    All the same, there are so many good men and women speaking out at the moment from all spheres of political and business life,  the ANC in particular,  that “the force” would appear unstoppable.

Getting Parliament back into control and equal to the Cabinet will be a long process andparliament mandela statue calling for extreme patience, as manifested by our greatest President who demonstrated such incredible patience over many years in his long walk to freedom.

Previous articles on category subject

FIC Bill hold up goes to roots of corruption – ParlyReportSA

Parliament: National Assembly traffic jam – ParlyReportSA

Red tape worries with FIC Bill – ParlyReportSA

Anti-Corruption Unit overwhelmed – ParlyReportSA

 

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, earlier editorials, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament awaits to hear from Cabinet

Same Parliament, same Cabinet, different mood

..editorial……Parliament has now resumed with the same Cabinet, the same 400 MPs, the same ANC Allianceparliament 6 majority instructed whips and the same names in the party benches but the ambiance is very different.     This subtle fact, however, matters little in the immediate future.   Legislation before the National Assembly (NA) will still be subject to a simple numbers game when it comes to voting. Well, almost.

In the case of a Section 76 Bill, that is a Bill that needs not merely the concurrence of that portion of the 400 MPs that sit in the NCOP but subject to full debate by all nine provinces and a mandate returned in favour or not, there might be the beginnings of healthier opposition. Power at local level has been emboldened since Parliament last met.

So far, matters of consequence have been that the Department of Energy has presented its REIPPP plan with support from most other than Eskom with no Minister present and the Mineral Resources Portfolio Committee has re-endorsed a revised Minerals and Petroleum  Resources Development Amendment Bill for process by the NCOP using its ANC majority. Again no Minister was present. Eskom will be presenting on this and matters regarding coal any day.

Old tricks

jacob zumaHowever, presuming the picture in Parliament stays as it is until the 2019 national election with Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma at the helm as President, it will be interesting to see what type and how much legislation is hammered through the NA by the ANC using the same old tactic of deploying party whips with threats of being moved down on the party list system for a total majority, timed last year in a rush just before a recess.

Notably, now in the case of three Bills sent for assent after being voted through, the three were not signed by President Zuma into law acting on legal advice.

With this trio now back with Parliament on the grounds of either suspected unconstitutionality and/or incorrect parliamentary procedure, the issue is now whether the coterie of Cabinet Ministers that surround the President, with Director Generals appointed by and who report to those Ministers, will take Parliament more seriously.

Not hearing

Good advice is not good advice when it comes in the form of a last minute warning not to put signature to any Bill thereby turning it into an Act of law. Plenty of such advice not do this in respect of a number of Bills was previously given during parliamentary portfolio committee debate, at parliamentary public hearings from affected institutions, business and industry and even earlier in public comment when the Bills were first published by gazette in draft form.

Similarly, the lesson seems not to be learnt in higher echelons that the independent regulatory entities are also not to be ignored – institutions from the Office of the Public Prosecutor to ICASA, from NERSA through to the board of the Central Energy Fund and from National Treasury to international courts, the UN and international bodies protecting human rights. Parliament is due to hear from ICASA any moment.

Most worrying, however, are the attempts to by-pass Treasury when presenting policy to Parliament. Ideological bullying can bankrupt a country in no time.

Such issues as Minister Aaron Motsoaledi’s National Health Insurance dream and Minister Joemat-Pettersson/President Jacob’s Zuma’s dream of six nuclear energy reactors – plans that the country should not possibly not countenance from a financial aspect – have neither been presented to Parliament in the proper national budget planning form or officially and financially endorsed.

Missing money details

Minister of Health, Aaron Motsoaledi, has gone as far as a White Paper to Parliament on the NHI and Minister Joemat-Pettersson has briefed Parliament on nuclear tendering. Treasury have said nothing about a financial plan in each case. Money is short, as evidenced by Treasury stepping in on the provisions for BEE preferential procurement. Somewhere there is a disconnect.

As for President Zuma’s continued pressure to bring traditional leaders into the equation with what amounts to two separate judicial systems and has even talked of the equivalent of four tiers of government – one therefore not even reporting to Parliament and certainly no idea of local government and nor subject to the PMFA  has its problems. President Zuma has used his ally, the Minister of Justice, to table the Traditional Courts Bill before Parliament. Opposition parties will walk out on that one, we are sure.

The Speaker of the House, Baleka Mbete, as part of the same coterie, has made a mild signal that the days of Cabinet maverick behaviour, even arrogance, towards Parliament and no respect for the separation of powers may be coming to an end. The SACP is clearly not happy. That is where the new ambiance felt in an unchanged Parliament may play an unofficial part and pressure may start building.

 
Previous articles on category subject
Parliament to open Aug 16 – ParlyReportSA
Parliament under siege – ParlyReportSA
Radical White Paper on NHI published – ParlyReportSA
Zuma’s nuclear energy call awaits Treasury – ParlyReportSA
Here it comes again…. the Traditional Courts Bill – ParlyReportSA

Posted in cabinet, earlier editorials, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Justice, constitutional, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament and the investment climate

Seven issues spooking investment…….

editorial……Nothing, absolutely nothing, will stop growth more effectively than to be constantly changing the investment national assemblyclimate by altering the playing field levels; criminalising business for non-compliance of local laws which have nothing to do with business; and bringing about the kind of atmosphere of uncertainty in which investors are constantly attempting to establish current government policy and the reasons for any changes.

Not to understand the reasons is sometimes worse than disagreeing with them. At least if one dislikes an idea one can usually work around the issue. As long as you know its constant its good for investment.

What we know

At parliamentary portfolio committee level, the issue of transformation has been accepted by all as necessary. All are agreed that apartheid was a terrible thing. Most realize that taxes will, without doubt go up, such as carbon tax and probably VAT, as will the cost of living. Most are agreed that service delivery in respect of the ideals of the NDP, especially at local level, is pretty poor.

Also, most agree that just before any kind of election, parliamentarians say some pretty odd things and make totally impractical promises in order to get votes. Look at the USA. However, in rating agency terms of where we stand in South Africa most of these issues have been “discounted”, to use their term.

What we need to know

stone sizaniHowever, in Parliament, cabinet statements, budget vote speeches and government departmental briefings are important to study in terms of trying to establish some measure of understanding as to where government is headed. The aim is always to establish certainty, not give views.

With certainty in the offing, capital investment can be planned for and growth expected. A clearer picture of government policy is always necessary for the greenhouse of ideas in planned expansion and development; whether the plans are worth the risk to exploit and, furthermore, to create an environment where the international message goes out…… this is the place to invest.

What we don’t knowgreen question mark

So what is troubling investors?    Aside from the nonsense going on at the SABC, here’s a few ideas and we are sure there are more….

Seven good reasons for a start:

1. What is the real plan of execution behind the Expropriation Bill? Definitions ranging from “the basis of land reform”; queries on the definition on “the public interest”; and a determination, it appears, not to study the constitutional aspects; all these queries and worries contribute to uncertainty.

2. Imagine what happened to planning departments in the mining industry during the last eight months with Minister Zwane’s surprise contributions to BEE shareholder arrangements and also by stating he was turning charters into law, presumably as part of MPRDA legislation. Uncertainty reigned.

3. It’s not good to hear that the BEE pointing system is to change yet again under the Preferential Procurement Act in major sectors that contribute to growth. One understands that President Zuma warned of this in SONA but how many more changes are to come but how many more times will DTI refine their idealogical BEE process?

4. When are intellectual property uncertainties to end? Where is the new legislation? Planning for the internationals in the pharmaceutical industry can hardly be easy.

5. New climate change fuel specifications are upon us and the Minister of Energy is totally uncertain on this issue, as she is with gas exploration, shale gas, a state refinery and the energy mix generally. Many potential investors have given up the waiting around and have gone, whether the oil price drop was to blame or not.

6. Minimum wage legislation will eventually arrive as far as the human resources environment is concerned but labour law as a whole is in flux with new drafts still with NEDLAC. South Africa is now rated one of the worst countries for an uncertain labour climate.

7. The national health insurance scheme coming from the likes of Minister Aaron Motsoaledi is foggy, unsettling to the financial world and confusing to medical health providers. Issuing White Papers is fine but turning these into legislation requires a finely tuned plan and policy directive. One never knows what the good doctor is to say next.

Cabinet cohesion

A lot of the problems come either from Ministers with little interest in the investment climate and who are probably not up the demands of their portfolio, or who appear to have “hobby horses” of their own. In addition, the friction between National Treasury and the Cabinet, so evident in Parliament, is adding fuel to the fire in terms of financial uncertainty.

A good orchestra always needs a good conductor with the ability of bringing people together accompanied by legislative certainty providing the musical score. South Africa badly needs a leader who can do this.

In parliamentary terms, most will be more relaxed when the current local elections are over; Parliament can restart and pressure then applied again to get clarity on exactly what investors can and should expect.

Previous articles on category subject
Parliament, ConCourt and Business – ParlyReportSA
Minister Brown wants utility shareholder management – ParlyReportSA
Editorial: Working committees – ParlyReportSA

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MPRDA Bill returned to National House of Leaders

Some sort of movement on MPRDA at last……..

sent to clients 18 March…..In a parliamentary document recently published it is shown that the Mineral and Petroleumcoal mining Resources Development Amendment (MPRDA) Bill has been sent on a token trip through the National House of Traditional Leaders for comment in thirty days and then to be returned to the Portfolio Committee on Mineral Resources.

This is probably for some temporary major changes to be made to the Bill after debate until such time as two new Bills, one for the mining industry and one for the oil and gas industry, are drafted in time to come.     No doubt this movement was initiated as the result of the recent meeting between President Zuma and business leaders.

The extraordinary affair of the MPRDA has been going on since the first draft of the Bill was published for comment in December 2012 regulating extensively the exploitation of minerals and resources and the legal movement and transfer of resource rights.    Both industries have their own and very different BEE charters and the single Bill deals with both and many empowerment factors.

Core issues


Two issues
of note were that in the new Bill as originally proposed the Minister was to form a new “entity” which will “promote onshore and offshore exploration for and production of petroleum” and which will also “receive, store, maintain, interpret, add value to, evaluate, disseminate or deal in all geological or geophysical information” relating to petroleum and gas exploration matters.

Secondly, sections 80 and 84 of the anchor Act were to be amended to provide for State participation in any successful minerals and gas/oil development exercises carried out by the private sector, the Bill providing for a State right to free carried interest in all such exploration and production rights.
Specific details regarding the extent of the “free carry” were to be published in a government gazette, a figure of 20%susan shabangu being bandied about at the time.   “We are on the path of changing the mining and petroleum industry in South Africa, whether you like it or not,” said Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu earlier in 2014.

Strong views

Accompanied by a public outcry and strongly worded objections from private industry, foreign companies and other institutions, the Bill reached Parliament virtually unchanged.    Again, brought up before the Portfolio Committee on Mineral Resources in public hearings, were strong objections from Opposition MPs and institutionalised industry, neither of whom minced their words, describing the Bill, in one case, as a “self-destruction tool of South Africa’s investment climate.”

Nevertheless, the ANC Alliance continued on their course and the Bill was hammered through in a rush at the end of the parliamentary term, the ANC summonsing through its whip sufficient numbers.

In the background, as the Bill went through Parliament, was the fact that the Department of Mineral Resources and the Department of Energy were only just completing their split apart. Crossed wires were the order of the day.

Nothing happened

Since that date the Bill has sat in limbo; a new Mineral Resources Minister Ngoako Ramatlhodi Ngoako Ramatlhodiagreeing shortly after with the with mining companies and the Chamber of Mines that the best and fastest way forward to bring certainty to the mining and oil drilling industry would be to pass the Bill subject to amendments based on a new approach to the mining beneficiation issue.

Secondly, the matter of state “free carry” could be dropped.

At the time it was guessed that at least a year and a half would be the delay if two replacement Bills were to be drafted, separating mineral resources from oil and gas in the light of the fact that both have separate and very different BEE charters. The quicker alternative to bring some certainty was that temporary amendments to the existing Bill should be made.

Despite this, the Bill has just stuck right there, in the President’s office, until recently, now moving back togas exploration sea Parliament because, as is suspected, business leaders in their recent discussions with President Zuma must have drawn his attention to the continuing lack of lack of certainty in both industries because of unknown legislative changes about to occur and an apparent inability by Cabinet to give clear policy leads.

So where are we?

So as far as the MPRDA Bill is concerned, there is movement in the goods sidings but whether any train is about to start on a journey can only be known when a meeting is scheduled by the Portfolio Committee on Mineral Resources. Yet another minister is the train driver.

Previous articles on category subject

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Parliament rattled by Sizani departure

Closed ranks on Sizani resignation…..

As South Africa struggles with the backlash of having had three finance ministers rotated in four days and
Stone-Sizani-XXX-news echoes around the parliamentary precinct that the Chief Whip of the ANC has resigned, there is a palpable feeling amongst MPs that all is not well within the governing party. The resignation of Hon Stone Sizani has come at a bad time.

Also, the legislation that is zeroed in at Parliament at the moment clearly indicates that President Zuma cares much about the rural vote and knows full well that in the months before the municipal elections that this is the power base that must be focused upon politically. His recent statement that land reform will be backdated to the 1800s manifests this view.

Team spirit

But then much of the political rhetoric at the moment is typical of a pre-election period. This has unfortunately arisen at a time that the country is on a knife’s edge in terms of both financial ratings and a possible increase in interest rates.

cropped-sa-parliament-2.jpgThe dilemma being experienced in parliamentary meetings at the moment is how to turn the ever apparent failure of government departments to meet their targets and constant reminders that projects have not even arrived at tender stage into the positive spin called for by business heads to kick start team spirit and overcome the country’s difficulties by creating more jobs.

The fact is that the parliamentary process calls for oversight of government activities and criticism is an essential part of any debate. It therefore becomes difficult to walk the fine line between exposing obvious failure and unwarranted expenditure at a time when the country needs only good news.

Good news

Maybe, it would be good then to report, as we hereby do, that the meeting between business heads and President Zuma has produced a positive reaction amongst most parliamentarians, except of course the EFF and extreme Left. It has produced the re-emergence of the MPRDA Bill, sadly without the scrapping of the Private Security Industry Bill. It has seen some excellent plans emerging in the world of SOEs and public utilities.

It has also seen the re-emergence of positive statements of progress in transport, roads and the positive fact that Eskom has reported to Parliament that it feels it can make it without load shedding at the tariff figure fixed by Nersa. Also the rush to spend enormous figures on nuclear power has been slowed down.

Certainly it is good to see at most meetings reference made to the saving of unnecessary expenditure and an acceptance by most in Parliament that things cannot go on as they were.

Posted in earlier editorials, Earlier Stories0 Comments

MPRDA Bill to be amended urgently

Some form of compromise….

coal miningIn referring back to Parliament the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill (MPRDA) and acknowledging in his State of Nation Address (SONA) that in its present form it could be damaging to South Africa’s investment climate, President Zuma and his cabinet have introduced more certainty to both the mining and oil and gas industries.

At least a year and a half delay was a guess if the suggestion that two replacement Bills were to be drafted separating mineral resources from oil and gas in the light of the fact that both have separate BEE charters.

Certainty needed

However, mineral resources minister Ngoako Ramatlhodi has agreed with mining companies and also the point put forward by Chamber of Mines that the best and fastest way forward to bring certainty to theRoughnecks wrestle pipe on a True Company oil drilling rig outside Watford industry would be to pass the Bill subject to amendments based on a new approach to the mining beneficiation issue and the matter of state “free carry” in any successful gas exploration.

Originally, on an issue raised both in submissions and by opposition parties and, even a couple of ANC MPs, the presidency has also agreed to doubts expressed whether, once signed, the MPRD Act after amendment would pass constitutional muster on the basis of the amending Bill’s passage through Parliament and the process adopted.

Section 79(1) of the Constitution empowers the President to return a Bill to Parliament for reconsideration if reservations about the constitutionality of the Bill prevail.

Mining land

Subsequently pointed out as a further reason for the Bill not beingtrad leaders signed, raised in a presidency statment issued by spokeperson Mac Maharaj, was a concern of cabinet that the Bill had to be processed through the Council of Traditional Leaders.

Parliament passed the Bill all in a rush at the end of March 2014 after much lobbying by ANC whips and despite warnings and constitutional challenges from many parties.  Nearly a year has passed since sending the proposals off for presidential assent.

The subject of the regulatory environment has not even been touched upon or has come up in the debate at this stage.

During the parliamentary recess both the Chamber of Mines and others have complained of sustained uncertainty in their industries and in the investment world.

Two issues emerged almost immediately when the President announced he was delaying his signature. The first issue was a hefty warning from mineral resources minister Ngoako Ramatlhodi who said “the implications for companies that did not meet BEE targets set out in the mining charter would be severe”, inferring that this might eventually affect the granting of mining licences. He raised, once again, the issue of employee shareholding.

“Developmental” metals pricing

Consequently, it still remains somewhat foggy what government policy was in instituting such clauses other than an overall ambition for the state to have more ownership of strategic resources in both industries and the drive by minister of trade and industry, Dr Rob Davies, to assist smaller manufacturing metals industries becoming more viable at the cost of larger industries, therefore creating more jobs, he said.

On the subject of BEE and the two different charters affected, all that has been said officially was a remark by minister Ramatlhodi “We have to satisfy ourselves that the Act meets our broader socio-economic development activities.”

The second issue to emerge after the announcement of the return of the MPRDA to Parliament was further mention by the department of energy of“Operation Phakisa”, the speed-up process as part of a co-ordination exercise with the oil and gas industry to reduce reliance on oil imports.

Fracking and renewables

On a separate issue, further statements by ministers with regard to fracking and speeding of delays in the IPP world with renewables has also emerged, overshadowed by the urgent need of an energy plan from the newly formed energy “war room”.

Whatever happens, both industries should be prepared for another round of public comment, hopefully in the first parliamentary period after the Budget…… minister of finance Nene notably mentioning nothing of nuclear interest in his budget speech.
Other articles in this category or as background
Energy War Room formed to meet crisis – Parly ReportSA
Mineral and Petroleum Resources Bill halted perhaps – ParlyReportSA
Medupi is the key to short term energy crisis – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Land,Agriculture, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Liquid fuels industry short on BEE charter

Fuel industry attacked on BEE …

On the subject of black economic empowerment  (BEE), acting director of the department of energy (DoE), Tseliso Maqubela, told Parliament, before it went into short recess, that the major target for his department was to ensure a more immediate transformation of the liquid fuels industry.   Economic transformation in the energy sector was a top priority, he said, and he told the portfolio committee on energy that much more was needed to be done by this sector to improve the situation.

This was reminiscent of similar complaints made of the mining industry under the same BEE charter by the director general of the department of mineral resources.

Victor Sibiya said, as DoE’s  deputy director of petroleum products, also acting, that one of the three pillars of his department’s programme was compliance, monitoring and enforcement and whilst 30% of petroleum licensing permits showed around a 50% compliance factor this was not enough and new legislation was on its way to “toughen up” on B-BBEE regulations.

New code called for

The challenge at present, he said, was that the process of penalisation was far too cumbersome and did not deal sufficiently with repeated offenders.   A revised code was urgently required, he added.

On a separate subject, Sibaya said that as far as the basic fuel price (BFP) was concerned all calculations were based as if the final product had been produced in South Africa.  DoE was at work, he said, on a paper studying the various elements that contributed to the BFP, particularly with regard to smoothing out fluctuations to the consumer and attempting to align municipalities to the magisterial zones which governed the distribution.

Retail margins were also being studied in a second round of estimations working with operations carried out by what was referred to as the “DoE model service station”. Other factors included the shortly to be published biofuels price schedule which would govern the mix with petroleum products.

Reaching out

Further to economic transformation programmes, Sibaya spoke of a programme to establish fuel stations in deeper rural areas supplying other forms of energy needed by households such as LPG and extending services to include food, household retail goods and community services to improve quality of household life amongst the poor, another NDP priority.

In broad terms the acceleration of LPG supplies to rural areas, in fact to all areas in general, would contribute greatly, he said, to this objective.

Acting DG Tseliso Maqubela said he would respond to the parliamentary enquiry on the volatility of fuel prices in a prepared paper shortly, as this issue was also in the process of being studied at present. When asked about the levy on purchase of vehicles and where the funds went, Maqubela said this was in national treasury’s domain and was “probably an attempt by treasury officials to mitigate on carbon emissions”.

Refinery decisions

Touching on petroleum issues, DG of energy policy, planning and clean energy, Ompi Aphane, told the committee that a decision would be taken during 2016 on expanding oil refining capacity in South Africa based on the conclusions of the liquid fuels infrastructure plan.

Contributing to the basic costs of energy at the moment in South Africa, he said, were current world tensions particularly in the Middle East.   Self-dependency, however, was unfortunately only a long-term goal, he said.

A similar plan to increase refining was an increase in gas supplies based on the current gas usage master plan that had been started and this programme would be concurrent with an urgent expansion of gas storage facilities in the country.

Minister weighs in

Most of parliamentary question time was occupied by the new minister of energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson, who spoke broadly on energy issues; the fact that she recognised the need for urgent decisions by her ministry; and the necessity for her recently launched ministerial advisory committee on energy to receive input “in order that the opinions of all stakeholders can be considered.”

Such a ‘brains trust’, she said, should also include representation from the portfolio committee on energy itself.

Other articles in this category or as background

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//?s=bee+liquid+fuels

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/eskom-black-owned-coal-mining/

 

 

Posted in BEE, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Mineral and Petroleum Resources Bill halted perhaps

Mineral and Petroleum Act extends State rights…

New MPRDA starts with 20% free carry, maybe more….

oil rigThe Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, the legislation that will give the state a right to a 20% free carried interest in all new exploration and production rights in the energy field, has been passed by Parliament before it closed and sent to President Zuma for assent. According to press reports, new minister of mineral resources, Ngoako Ramatlhodi, may have halted the process by request, however, in the light of public sentiment and opposition moves to challenge the Bill’s legality.

Section 3(4) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (MPRDA) currently states that the amount of royalty payable to the State must be determined and levied by the Minister of Finance in terms of an Act of Parliament. This Act, in force, is the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Royalty Act 28 of 2008 but considerable uncertainty always surrounded how this would work and what was actually meant.

Any uncertainty has now been removed and the MPRDA amendments now passed have brought to an end a process which started when the draft Bill was first published for comment in December 2012.

Beneficiation of minerals included

mine dumpThe legislation seeks to “regulate the exploitation of associated minerals” and make provision for the implementation of an approved beneficiation strategy through which strategic minerals can be processed locally for a higher value – the exact definition of the word “beneficiation” yet having to be defined.

Importantly, the new Act will give clear definitions of designated minerals; free carried interest; historic residue stockpiles; a mine gate price; production sharing agreements; security of supply and state participation generally.

Stockpiles and residues affected

The new Act also states that regulations will apply to all historic residue stockpiles both inside and outside their mining areas and residue deposits currently not regulated belong to the owners. Ownership status will remain for two years after the promulgation of the bill.

In addition to the right to a 20% free carried interest on all new projects, ownership by the state can be expanded via an agreed price or production sharing agreements.

The NCOP concurred with Bill on its passage through Parliament and made no changes.

Legal commentators note that the Royalty Act, at present in force, triggers payment in terms of the MPRDA upon “transfer”, this being defined as the consumption, theft, destruction or loss of a mineral resource other than by way of flaring or other liberation into the atmosphere during exploration or production.

The Royalty Act differentiates between refined and unrefined mineral resources as “beneficiation”, this being seen as being important to the economy; incentives being that refined minerals are subject to a slightly lower royalty rate.

Coal and  gas targeted maybe

Nevertheless it appears, commentators note, that in terms of mineral resources coal is being targeted and also zeroed in on is state participation in petroleum licences. Others have pointed to the possible wish of government to have a state owned petroleum entity such as PetroSA to be involved fracking exploration.

Earlier versions of the Bill entitled the State to a free carried interest of 20% and a further participation interest of 30%, with the total State interest capped at 50%; however, the version that Parliament approved removed the reference to a 30% participation interest as well as the limit of 50%, effectively giving the State the right to take over an existing petroleum operation, law firm Bowman Gilfillan explained in a media release earlier this month.

Democratic Alliance (DA) Shadow Minister of Mineral Resources, James Lorimer said in a statement that the Act, “would leave the South African economy in a shambles”, adding that this would lead to people losing their jobs.

The DA has said it has now begun a process to petition President Zuma, in terms of Section 79 of the Constitution, to send this Bill back to the National Assembly for reconsideration,” he said.

Chamber opinion differs

Surprisingly, the Chamber of Mines stated that it “generally welcomed and supported” the approval of the MPRDA Amendment Bill, adding that it believed significant progress had been made in addressing the mining industry’s concerns with the first draft of the Bill, published back in December 2012.

Clearly the mining and petroleum industries particularly gas exploration industries, both of whom have separate equity BEE charters, are still very much at odds on the effects of the promulgation of such an Act, as is DA and the ANC.

Other articles in this category or as background

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/mprda-bill-causes-contention-parliament/

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/major-objections-minerals-and-petroleum-resources-bill/

Posted in BEE, cabinet, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament: last chance to clean up

Last session of parliament….

Houses_of_Parliament_(Cape_Town)The final gathering of a Parliament is always an auspicious time. This is the thirteenth parliament of South Africa as a republic but currently the fourth under the ANC, this particular parliament having been started in 2009.   How time passes indeed.

Four times five is twenty and nobody can change the fact that this is the number of years we have had in South Africa to get things into first gear and pull away as leaders in Africa.

The poor still out there

But whilst security was always the issue in governments before 1994, service delivery to the poor has been the issue ever since, followed more recently by the need to fill the gap caused by inaction on infrastructure build.   When will the poor actually not be poor seems to be the question and in the case of South Africa the answer always seems to be within our grasp.

As do the energy, rail, transport and harbour, the communications, health and education issues seem to be equally just within our grasp.   Closing that gap is, of course, not helped by the lack of skills and training at the coalface and where it matters.

Up skilling in skills

Aspects to watch in Parliament over the coming weeks involve monitoring the reports of each department’s on the skills training aspect.  Expense was not been spared in the budget. Everybody has been given money. But the “work-hard, focused, skillful, get it done properly” Chinese mentality seems to be missing.

Where the Chinese score is through leadership and therein lies the rub in South Africa, from the top, to the most low worker.

Leadership vacuum maybe

With an extraordinarily long list of legislation to get through in the next session of Parliament it will be interesting to see if the qualities of leadership emerge at all, or the country remains driven, even at cost to basic economic structures, by imperatives to get votes.

Unusual has been the move by the President to return the Protection of State Information Bill back to Parliament, ostensibly in the light of some grammatical errors. Whilst this does not vitally affect the business world, other than perhaps a number of businesses or industries in a strategic role finding itself involved or suspected as being involved in the leaking of some highly sensitive subject – say nuclear or defence, this affair will play out noisily in our newspapers but is not really a serious business issue.

Last minute rush

Meanwhile, the last session of any parliamentary government period will always see MPs distracted by forthcoming elections whilst attempting to handle a voluminous amount of legislation that sincerely affects business and they would like to see passed before the period ends.    Consequently, the expression “fast-tracking” will occur again and again over the coming two months.

Ministers will also make many a speech from a podium aimed at the electorate, rather than adding substance to a legislative issue.  Much will involve sorting the wheat from the chaff when it comes to government policy on critical issues.

Shabangu drops a bomb

Critical issues are obviously the Minerals and Petroleum Resources amendments, bearing in mind minister Shabangu’s recent statement on “free carry” and the ability of the state  to acquire up to 50% shareholding in gas exploration successes; the combining of the liquid fuels and mining BEE charters; land reform; fracking, carbon tax and e-tolling.

Also a certain number of ministers will be attempting to justify their stay in the cabinet and the requirement of pleasing the electorate will feature more heavily on their minds than that of the international investment public. Much will have to be ignored.

This is always a bad period for South African public relations; the political lobby; government relations and for departmental heads who may get rough treatment as they report to MPs on their achievements and as Parliament progresses towards the period of the medium term budget.

Heads down.

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Uncertainty in oil and gas exploration industry

Oil and gas industry criticizes MPRDA Bill…

Government’s definition of what an  oil and gas industry stakeholder is and the continuous use of that mysterious word “player” have both come in for some serious investigation after the recent hearings into the Minerals and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, which aims to grab a stake in oil and gas exploration industry and combine the BEE charters of both the mining and liquid fuels industry with regard to employment and beneficiation.

The minister now announced that the state will be able, it will be pr0posed, to acquire at first 20% in successful gas exploration ventures  without capital outlay (called “free carry”) and subsequently 50%.

In the case of this Bill tabled in Parliament, after public comment, participation with industry stakeholders, such consultation with stakeholders has been claimed by the minister involved both in print in the written background to the Bill as part of the tabled document and by the departmental of mineral resources in  briefings to the portfolio committee concerned.

Generally, liquid fuels companies are concerned at the suggestion that if both BEE charters are combined it is like “combining water and oil”, to quote one member, since the mining industry is more labour intensive with massive capital outlay and the liquid fuels industry is twice as capital intensive but with less manual labour involved but greatly higher risk issues in capital outlay.

According to a number of oil and gas industry exploration companies vitally affected by the proposals contained in the Bill, any discussions with the gas exploration industry  has neither happened nor were they even notified.

State participation

Considering the fact that the Bill proposes acquisition by legislation of shareholding in those companies and regulations, as yet unpublished, will vitally affect not only their balance sheet but whether they enter into ventures in the first place, makes this is extraordinary.

One imagines that not only are eyebrows raised in the international world of trading and investment but some unfortunate comparisons made to other failed states in Africa.

Certainly there is a fear of exploitation in Africa and not without undue reason. Also it was hoped that one set of reasonable rules, known well ahead, would bring the kind of certainty that was needed to key worldwide industries and this would bring in turn South Africa to the top of list in investment destinations in an otherwise very unstable and avaricious stable of governments to our North.

Lack of certainty

From what has been said during the hearings on the Minerals and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, the minister would seem to be way off mark with this new Bill, some of those making submissions saying it was the first time they got their voices heard and others stating that some of the conditions are outrageous.

Whilst the terminology “hearings” is used for such sessions after a Bill is tabled, we just hope that the minister is listening.

Posted in Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

MPRDA Bill brings changes in BEE and exploration rights

BEE consolidated

coal miningMoses Mabuza, when briefing Parliament on the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment (MPRDA) Bill, told parliamentarians that amongst the many issues proposed by the new Bill an important issue was the setting up of penalties for non-BEE compliance across both the mining and liquid fuel sectors.

However, he said that he was confident that all stakeholders in the both industries would look back on a their association with black empowerment with understanding and pleasure, despite the opposition to the Bill on various differing and wide-ranging issues at present.

Bill will create right environment

Mabuza, who is deputy director general, mineral and policy promotion,department of mineral resources (DMR), said industry will be surprised see how much this legislation in the years to come will have contributed  to the country’s development, both in the mining, liquid fuels industry and business in general.    He told told the portfolio committee on mining resources, when briefing MPs on the Bill page by page, that it was important to understand government’s viewpoint as far as the oil and gas industry is concerned.

“We want to see that no partnerships created by the Bill are mutually exclusive or self interested”, he said. “We wish to create an environment where the state participates together with mining and gas industry with nation’s developmental objectives in mind.”

Blank cheque

“We give you the assurance”, Mabuza said, “that any regulations which are to follow will provide the kind of certainty sought in both the mining and petroleum industry”.

Opposition members still called to see the basis of the regulations first before further debate, since they claimed that at present, and as things stood, the wording of the Bill amounted to giving the state “a blank cheque” by not knowing what regulations were to be imposed.

The minister objected to this, saying that trust was called for and DMR would sit down with other departments and stakeholders and agree upon regulations within the framework  of the Act. “This is the only way things can work”, Mabuza said. “That is why the Act is a framework, with us all working from this plan.”

Working with stakeholders

In tracing the history of the MPRDA, deputy Mabuza and his co-presenter for policy development in DMR, Adrian Arendse, continually referred to stakeholder meetings throughout the process over the years, including stakeholder workshops where the various parties consulted were broken down into sectors such as environmental, petroleum industry, mining industry, finance and bankers and legal interests.

“We received commendable inputs from these workshops and in an overall sense, particularly where mining and petroleum was concerned and we have received both consensus and support for the proposals now before Parliament.”

Not conducive

Opposition parliamentarians denied this saying from what they had heard that there had not been overall consensus on many issues and the complete lack of uncertainty.   Lack of clarity on state motives was a total disincentive to investors, commented one MP.    Said another opposition MP, “Mining industry representatives have said in the media that this Bill will not grow the industry, so tell us why you think it will.”

Deputy director Mabuza, in response, again gave assurances from government that the proposed Bill represents no fundamental shift in government policy. He said clarity and certainty would follow in the course of time as regulations became evident.

Different horses on courses

Further on BEE matters, questions were asked on how government intended putting into force a parallel BEE charter that incorporated the liquid fuels charter, which called for less than 10% ownership as a target, and the mining charter which was at 27%, plus other anomalies.   One MP said that in gas exploration there were enormous developmental costs and the charter made no sense on these issues.

Mabuza said he was aware of the “vast differences” between the two documents and this would have to be discussed in rounds of talks to come and considered carefully. Some of those talks had already started, not referring with whom and on what particular subject.

However, he said there were also big differences in the industries themselves, in both matters of beneficiation and style of operations. DMR wanted to land up in a situation where nobody was disadvantaged, either the poor or the investor.

Exploration rights change

On exploration rights, Mabuza said where the Bill really differed from previous regimes was that the “first come first served” principle in exploration and rights licensing was to be abolished totally. “This system leads to mediocrity”, he said. “We have learnt much over the 15 years with such licensing regulations, during which time South Africa has lost it share in global resource exploration, going from 3% to a current 1%. We do not wish to go down this road any longer”, he said on licensing.

“The first person served often meets the absolute minimum requirements and in so many cases, South Africa has had years of brownfields investments and never the greenfields operations that number 5 or 20 in the queue might have offered for a license on the same project. Mediocrity resulted and South Africa has suffered consequently”, he said.

Mining and energy split

In answer to questions on the liaison between DMR and the department of energy (DOE), Mabuza described the sphere of control under the MPRD Act as being simply a question of “downstream” energy resources being for DOE and “upstream” matters on exploration mining licences and industry regulations being for DMR.  Obviously, he said, environmental issues were handled by those competent to do so.

Mabuza said that in coming up with the proposed Bill, DMR had consulted with, or observed, the practices of Canada, Angola, Ivory Coast, Russia and Gabon but opposition members complained that the process of consultation or observation meant absolutely nothing.   They want to know who DWEA had listened to in coming up with the current proposals.  Those before Parliament said they had made their own decisions and stakeholders had been involved along the road in discussions, particularly in the mining industry.

Planned for the future

Mabuza said that South Africa “remained the wealthiest mining and exploration production country in the world and with Africa reaching never-before, unprecedented levels of geo-political stability, the future was bright.   “We have designed legislation that takes both the state and our developmental economy into that future”, he said.

On the subject of penalties in the area of BEE non-compliance, opposition members complained that such contributed further to red tape, political uncertainty and investor complications.    Mabuza denied this and told parliamentarians that any penalties written into the Bill were a maximum sum only “and in any case”, he said, the 10% maximum still represented ‘just petty cash’ for most mining companies”.

“We had to bring in some form of penalty where shareholders were alerted to non-compliance otherwise management just carried on regardless of regulations or compliance issues”, Mabuza said.

Refer previous articles in this category
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/mineral-and-petroleum-development-bill-grabs-resources/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/draft-mprda-bill-for-comment/

Posted in BEE, Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Mineral and Petroleum Development Bill grabs resources

The state muscles in…

offshore gasThe Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, approved by the cabinet in May, has now been tabled in Parliament and sections 80 and 84 of the anchor Act are to be amended, it is proposed, to provide for State participation in petroleum development carried out by the private sector.

The draft bill was published for comment in December 2012 and the proposed legislation, other than to extensively address the issue of re-describing many definitions and include petroleum and petroleum products in many of the issues covered by the Act such as beneficiation, also regulates extensively the exploitation of minerals and the legal movement and transfer of resource rights.

The new Bill also aligns the MPRDA with the newly assented Geoscience Amendment Act and “addresses shortcomings identified, whilst simultaneously streamlining the administrative processes in relation to the regulation of the mining environment management function”.

“New entity” to be formed

Two issues are of note in that under section 71 of the new Bill it is proposed that the minister forms a “new entity” which will “promote onshore and offshore exploration for and production of petroleum” and which will also “receive, store, maintain, interpret, add value to, evaluate, disseminate or deal in all geological or geophysical information relating to petroleum submitted” of the anchor Act, the MPRDA.

The new entity (and it is to be assumed those involved in “exploitation” of minerals and petroleum must through such an entity) must, it is proposed, “ bring to the notice of the Minister any information in relation to the exploration and production of petroleum which is likely to be of use or benefit to the state”. This clause will no doubt cause debate.

The background to the Bill clearly states that in terms of the new proposals, Sections 80 and 84 of the anchor Act are amended to provide for the state participation in petroleum development as described and that the state “has a right to a free carried interest in all new exploration and production rights”.

The proposal that matters

Section 84 of the MPRDA is further amended to include State board participation in the holders of production rights in terms of the proposals.

Section 2.9 of the background giving policy views also underlines the concept that the state will “exercise its rights and options having evaluated the applicable finance modalities to prioritise and optimise state participation in petroleum exploitation and in line with the national developmental priorities.”

The newly tabled Bill states that “specific details regarding the extent of the State’s free carried interests” will be published in a government gazette.

More background articles on subject
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/south-africa-at-energy-crossroadsdoe-speaks-out/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/draft-mprda-bill-for-comment/

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry, Uncategorized0 Comments

MPRD Amendment Bill to be tabled early 2013

MPRD Amendments will cause heat in oil industry…..

susan shabanguNot yet scheduled for meetings by committees or hearings dates in Parliament, is the draft Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill for which mineral resources minister, Susan Shabangu, obtained cabinet approval for in early December last year and who  called for public comment on the draft by the end of January 2013.        With a problematic preamble which states that the draft Bill is to promote the concept that “that the nation’s minerals are developed in an orderly manner while promoting justifiable social and economic development”, certain sectors have already provoked considerable industry comment which were presumably have been conveyed in comments to the minister and her department as called for when gazetted.

Amongst the many “refined existing definitions”, the draft Bill as it stands at present and possibly to be tabled seeks to allow the state to acquire by right of ownership any mineral resource to a “free carried interest” in any exploration matter and a right to acquire “a further interest” in that exploration with also production rights “through an organ of state or state owned company”.

Changes are also proposed on the issue of ministerial limitations on the ability of mining companies to trade JSE shares on the open market.

PASA to go

The disbanding of the Petroleum Agency of South Africa appears to be on the cards as well, since the draft Bill clearly relegates all functions of this agency to the department of mineral resources (DMR) and much of the work undertaken with and by DMR will now be allocated under the Geosciences Act, other work passing from DMR to fall under the National Environmental Management Act and therefore bringing in a further department.

“Technically, therefore, government departments would become a petroleum regulator”, was the comment by the Offshore Petroleum Association of SA in the Johannesburg press. However, clarification of this and the situation with regard to PetroSA and the acquisition of exploration rights will presumably emerge during parliamentary hearings since submissions so far in terms of the gazetted document are naturally private.

The draft Bill also contains a great number of changes and redefinitions in the area of associate minerals affecting a broad spectrum of the mining industry. However, in particular the draft states that it proposes to “make provision for the implementation of the approved beneficiation strategy through which strategic minerals can be processed locally for a higher value”. The ability of the minister to set those beneficiation levels and any prices seems to be incorporated.

This specifically will bring focus upon the benefits from tailings in mine dumps, meaning that not necessarily the owners that created them originally will be the sole beneficiaries of subsequent workings. On this subject, the Bill also calls for a new description or interpretation of the word “beneficiation”, this to be inserted into the anchor legislation, the MPRDA itself, by amendment.

Regional mining developmental bodies and environmental committees regarding MPRDA matters are to be set up under the jurisdiction of DMR, such bodies having regional managers with powers.

What effect any submissions have will been seen from the document that is eventually tabled.

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