Tag Archive | Jacob Zuma

Parliament goes into Easter recess

….editorial….

Now you see it, now you don’t

……    It has now become almost impossible to avoid the use of the time-honoured expression “politics aside” when following legislative developments in Parliament.

The body politic affects most things all the time – from drafting a Bill to a
government media briefing, from debating a departmental investigation to public hearings on new legislation. It all involves the ideology of who is in charge.

In fact, the Oxford Dictionary describes “politics’ as follows: the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate between parties having power.

From this one can see how politics will always continue to dominate government policy, legislation, and the parliamentary process, since in the end all permeates down from Cabinet decisions. That’s the way it works. Until of course the moment occurs that corruption, cronyism and state capture dictate the parliamentary process itself.

Then the fine line between policy and politics gets rather tacky. Shady motives such as personal gain or protection from the law become evident. What started out as well-meaning policy can get warped by politics and the passage of legislation becomes erratic, if not unconstitutional.

Coded language

Clearly there are now two Cabinets in South Africa. Also, there are various government departments that tend to follow one faction or another, all reporting to their respective portfolio committees. Of these, some seem to adhere to parliamentary rules on oversight and others seem to be less deep in their probing.

This explains why Jackson Mthembu, Chief ANC Party Whip who conveys ANC messages to the party loyal in Parliament, plays such a critical and pivotal role.

When it becomes ‘a given’ that those in control willfully use the top-down structure to their advantage and become joined at the hip with the party list system, then the decision to follow the orders of the party begin to involve a fear of being unable to pay the school fees or pay the lease on the recently acquired BMW.

It is the party list system that is our constitutional blind spot. It encourages cronyism, defined once again in the Oxford Dictionary as: the appointment of friends and associates to positions of authority, without proper regard to their qualifications.

No change

When this aberration of the democratic process occurs on a regular basis, the expression “politics aside” seems to come back into usage. This time for a different reason.

Understandably, one cannot go through the whole laborious process in every debate and with every turn of inexplicable behaviour explaining the manipulation of facts or non-disclosure of relevant information; the influence that certain business persons have upon policy decisions; or the behaviour of state department heads who seems oblivious of their duties.

Therefore politically-correct shortcuts become necessary in order that one’s own opinion is not involved. It’s a sort of coded language that straight up and down people use as a replacement for the real thing.

So, politics aside, President Zuma is still holding up the Financial Intelligence Centre Bill to combat money laundering. Politics aside, Minister of Mining, Mosebenzi Zwane, is still attempting to get fifty-six changes adopted under the already approved Mineral and Petroleum Resources Amendment Bill and, politics aside, the Expropriation Bill is back with Parliament once again.

The good news

Far more interesting is that, politics aside, the separation of powers is still working to a greater or lesser degree; the legislative process is still being respected by most and irritating some; and the Constitutional Court is still out there as our standard bearer, minus a number of computers.

 

…. and, politics aside, we could be doing so much better.

editorial.... parlyreportsa....27 march 2017

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Madonsela: state capture and corruption…

says, Zuma involved in state capture.. 

editorial.. To those who know, the silence after a bomb goes off is quite uncanny. Like the state capture bomb. Even birdsongthuli-madonsela-2 ceases and the world seems to halt for a few seconds.  Then as things start up again, people seem to gabble. Everybody is rushing about. Life starts up but the noise seems incredible, if you can hear at all that is.   Following this comes the sickening realization that there might be a second bomb.   One seems helpless.

So it was when the Public Protector’s Report on State Capture was released.   Most had the feeling that to see in writing upon the frontispiece the words “state capture” was quite surreal.   Up until then it was rumour; an “alleged” idea; something that was always “strongly denied”; certainly, shady but in any case, difficult to prove… but it certainly shouldn’t happen in our backyard anyway.

Truth must out

thuli-encaThen the bombshell report was released.  The world seemed to halt in silence whilst its 355 pages were digested. Then came the voices, mostly loud and some quite vociferous.  Some demanded more proof; some demanded immediate retribution. Many asked for the President to step down, following which was a festival of interviews on e-NCA.    Meanwhile, in Parliament the corridors went quiet.   Like a phoney war.

Rewind

Whether there is a second bomb in the form of the Hawks and the NPA again charging Minister Pravin Gordhan is purely conjecture at this stage.   It is part of a process that Parliament is not privy to.   Parliamentarians must just watch these parties go about their business, unfortunately at the expense of a jittery investment market.

What we do know is that all judicial and parliamentary processes are painfully slow and this iscropped-sa-parliament-2.jpg as it must be.   Witness the complaints if a Bill is rushed or “hammered” through Parliament.  It rarely works when carried out at speed and the process is exposed for its faults.

The law may be an ass at times and very laborious but it is there to fight corruption.  To eventually win a case against such a difficult-to-prove crime may take time but it is devastatingly successful when achieved.

However, the name Gupta is not responsible for everything.   Some of unpleasant exposures, especially in the energy field, are the result of massive incompetence rather than a temptation of financial gain.

Taking time

In ParlyReportSA, now with clients, we detail four painfully long processes which eventually will result in what may not be liked by some but have been correctly subjected to the slow but democratic procedure of Parliament – the MPRDA Bill; the investigation into the tina-joemattIkwhezi R14.5bn loss; the sale of South Africa’s strategic oil reserves; and how the mini-budget of Minister Pravin Gordhan has evaded the claws of state capture.

Our constitutional, and therefore our parliamentary system which is integrated into it, is subject to a clause which states that the president of the country is the person who is elected as the president of the ruling party’s National Executive.    This outcome only changes if that person is found guilty of breaking the law or his and her oath of office. For this outcome to be proven can take much time.

Patience a virtue

Gratifyingly also, amongst many outstanding court procedures underway, the arduous parliamentary and legislative process to ensure a recalcitrant President gets around to signing the FICA Bill, is underway.

His signature is needed in order that the countrzuma1y can meet international banking obligations and comply with money-laundering disclosure requirements. The fact that the President has not signed it, as was put before him by Parliament and has provided no reason for the apparent lack of inertia to do so, speaks volumes.  Probably a case for personal privacy will be tabled by his defence team, if he gets to need one.

Delaying tactics

Either the President in this instance will waste taxpayer’s money with a long drawn out case or be advised to withdraw, as has been his practice up until now, by acceding at the last minute and will have signed or be told to.

zwaneHe and his associates know that this Bill is a critical tool in the fight against illegal transfers of funds by “prominent persons”.  Minister Zwane’s fight with the banking sector is an unnecessary sideshow connected to this process. More becomes evident in the media , day by day, of this gentleman’s shady dealings.

Dark forces

Another fight calling for patience and now being unearthed is the level of corruption within intelligence services, Hawks and the NPA.  Hopefully, this is not as deep as the relationship that Robert Mugabe had with Nicolae Ceaușescu of Hungary, based on which he built his CIO and followed the advice gained from his training with Nangking Military Academy.

hawks logoHopefully also, with the NPA, Hawks and other major undercover government departments, only such matters as  graft involving as rhino trade and state capture bribes are the tools of trade involved and the aim remains simply self-enrichment.

Hope springs

The “goodies” in South Africa have much to undertake in order to beat the “baddies”, not helped by senior ANC officials not getting off the fence for fear of being demoted on the party list and losing their pensions.    All the same, there are so many good men and women speaking out at the moment from all spheres of political and business life,  the ANC in particular,  that “the force” would appear unstoppable.

Getting Parliament back into control and equal to the Cabinet will be a long process andparliament mandela statue calling for extreme patience, as manifested by our greatest President who demonstrated such incredible patience over many years in his long walk to freedom.

Previous articles on category subject

FIC Bill hold up goes to roots of corruption – ParlyReportSA

Parliament: National Assembly traffic jam – ParlyReportSA

Red tape worries with FIC Bill – ParlyReportSA

Anti-Corruption Unit overwhelmed – ParlyReportSA

 

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, earlier editorials, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

FIC Bill hold up goes to roots of corruption

Bill originally approved by Cabinet

.….. sent to clients 20 Aug…..Going to the heart of the issues facing National Treasury on money launderingzuma9 and financial crime, or in this specific case the Financial Intelligence Centre Amendment Bill (FIC Bill), is the failure of President Zuma to give assent to the Bill and to sign it into law.

The delay in adding his signature gives yet another signal that there is lack of interface in constitutional terms between the Presidency, the Cabinet, National Treasury and Parliament and all of this adds more uncertainty in the economic sphere.

fic-logo-2The main objective of the FIC Bill is to conform with international pressure placed upon South Africa to update its governance ability to monitor international financial crime. During the passage of the Bill, however, it became quite evident to interested parties that the Bill could expose a lot more about South Africa’s own internal money laundering, inflows and outflows, than simply making a contribution to the global money laundering problem.

This, of course, was the original point made by international agencies when calling upon countries to agree to such legislation.    Countries have to clean up their own affairs in the process.

Crime busting

Africa MoneyThe Bill intends enhancing South Africa’s anti-money laundering (AML) processes to combat more effectively the crime of financing of terrorism to be achieved by amending the anchor Financial Intelligence Centre Act “so as to define certain expressions”.

However, in exposing monies destined for terrorism, a lot more than just terrorism could become evident in the category to be classed as “prominent persons”, a fact which has been endlessly debated in Parliament and why the Bill has come to the fore in the media.

More entrants

The fact that some in the Cabinet may not like the preamble to the Bill is evident, particularly expressed byzwane Minister Zwane in his ridiculous call for a judicial investigation to investigate the motives for calling the banking sector to report to Treasury on individual groupings and persons and for an investigation into the banks themselves for closing the accounts of certain “prominent persons”.

The target of Minister Zwane’s diatribe, the major banks, are a grouping simply preparing for the FIC Bill to become law since they know it was tabled by the Minister of Finance, having been approved by the Cabinet in the first place and having made considerable input to the parliamentary process. Also they must realize that the Bill in turn will make considerable demands upon them in terms of time and money and will be a test of integrity for all.

Split in the ranks

ramaphosaThe delay, even if for a moment, is one of many factors giving rise to the belief that the Cabinet is “at war with itself”, a fact which Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa admits. President Zuma attempted dismally at first to distance himself from Minister Zwane’s attack on the banks, then seemingly relented but suspiciously will not let the banks proceed with the FIC Bill by making it law to set up the paper trails.

Commentators say the President is effectively involved in a web of issues involving alleged “state capture” and perhaps therefore instructions to hold up the Bill maybe upon advice from elsewhere from parties involved in the bigger picture.

No stroke of the pen

However, the very act of signing or not will eventually show if it is the President is alone in this matter since a cabinet statement in 2015 stated that the Cabinet had approved for the Bill for tabling.Parliament awaits, holding its breath, for clarification from the Presidency.  President Zuma is now, of course, embroiled on issues over the Public Protector’s report on “stature capture” by the Gupta family and, like so many other important state issues, the FIC Bill has gone on to the back burner.

In the meanwhile others, including actors who would definitely be defined as “prominent persons” as defined by the new Bill, are now crowding the stage and expressing their views, so the FIC Bill must be touching a raw nerve somewhere.

The old argument

jimmy-manyiDespite the Bill being passed by State Law Advisors, now one Jimmy Manyi, previously a corporate public affairs head, a DG in the Department of Labour and previously a Cabinet spokesperson and recently President of the Progressive Professionals Forum – all in a short period of time – has lodged a constitutional challenge to the Bill, presumably on the basis of invasion of rights regarding pr1vacy. 

MPs have complained that the Bill in question has been debated at length over one year at portfolio committee level; hearings were conducted with public expression therefore being accounted for and finally the Bill was passed by a unanimous vote in the National Assembly.  Whether nefarious or not, one must assume that any delay by the President is for good financial reason and bearing in mind the call is in fact an international call to upgrade the SA money laundering watch, the stakes are high.

At this stage nothing is stated as fact and rumours abound.     An exasperated Minister of Finance Gordon Pravin stated in an interview run by E-NCA, “Well if I can’t get the Bill through then we must just try something else.” He added, “They had just better come and arrest me. What have I done?”, he asked.

The aim

pravingordhanIndeed, the parliamentary record shows quite clearly what Minister Pravin has done.    By introducing this Bill and having had it agreed to in the National Assembly, a paper trail  is to be established in conjunction with banks on any suspicious movement of money involving “prominent persons”.   Locked cupboards will be looked into therefore and it seems as if someone or a section in the Cabinet  has had second thoughts about the Bill.

Hopefully, the stall is only temporary and the Public Protector’s report is released

Aims of Bill

Treasury originally said in their briefing to Parliament that the four principal objects of the Bill were to align the country with international standards on AML and to counter terrorist bodies; to enhance customer due diligence within financial institutions; to provide for the implementation of the UN security council resolutions relating tomoney laundering the freezing of assets of persons suspected of financial crimes; and for the FIC to introduce a risk-based approach by financial entities to the current aspects international financial crime.

Treasury countered any argument that dis-investment would be encouraged by the Bill with the answer that a lack of compliance with international rules by South would be worse but now the silence on the FIC Bill seems to have taken a back seat in National Assembly questioning in the face of rows over state funding, “state capture” and individual financial investigative probes.

Prominent persons

yunus carrimMuch debate, took place at the time within the Standing Committee on Finance when the Bill was originally debated over the definition of “prominent persons both domestic and foreign”. These were the persons who were to be monitored as part of the Treasury’s appeal to banks “to know their clients better”. The meetings were chaired by the obdurate, diligent and politically respected Yunus Carrim (SACP) and finally recommended to the House.

Treasury’s Ismail Momoniat was at pains to state to Parliament at the time that “there was no implication or presumption that prominent persons being investigated were presumed to be involved in any financial crime.”

Getting to know you

Probably the provisions most likely to affect entities operating in South Africa are the clauses affecting due diligence. Those that are accountable in terms of the Act will be required to undertake ongoing customer due diligence overviews in order to establish the identity of “the beneficial owner” and a customer’s full identity and whereabouts.

This might be where the problem lies for Cabinet, not necessarily just about the “G people”, as referred to indavid maynier Parliament by David Maynier, Shadow Finance Minister (DA), but which might involve issues of party funding – the sources of which at the moment do not have to be declared to Parliament.

Objective views

As put by Roger Southall, Professor of Sociology, University of Johannesburg and quoted in précis form by Creamer Polity, “The ANC is appropriately anti-corruption in its official stance, and indeed has put in place important legislation and mechanisms to control malfeasance. Equally, however, it has proved reluctant to undertake enquiries which could prove embarrassing.” Parastatals still account for around 15% of GDP, Southhall notes.

Whilst Minister Lynne Brown said she was determined to overhaul all state entities, nobody its seems was ready for President Zuma to assume the chair of the new idea of a State Owned Enterprises Council, meaning that he is in charge of para-state strategy – the policy of which was announced many months ago in that government wants a greater slice of the R500m spend on goods and services to go to emergent suppliers.

President Zuma said in Parliament on that issue that the reason for the consolidation was to bring about cross-cutting coordination as a policy within state utilities.

Getting control

Southall continues in his article in similar vein, “The ANC continues to regard the parastatals as ‘sites of transformation’ with certain corporations distributing financial largesse to secure contracts and favour from government. However, their success in so doing is hard to prove given the secrecy of party funding. Secondly, ANC politicians at all levels of government have sought to influence the tender process in their favour.”

On the good side, the Department of Public Service and Administration has, for instance, a draft a Bill underway for Parliament that will require all government departments to put in place measures to prohibit employees and those in special consultancy positions from “directly or indirectly” doing business with government.

Furthermore, the Public Finance Management Act, signed by President Zuma, has proven to be a well-tuned tool to control misdirected state expenditure. The FIC Bill will be the anchor legislation needed to dig deeper into AML money movements.

Who blinks first

fic-bookWith the FIC Bill, the next move then must come from the Presidency, if he remains in  office, to give good reason to send the Bill back to the Parliament despite the agreement of the South African banking system to comply with Treasury requirements to report. This is a day-to-day developing issue.

Quite clearly, some banks have forestalled their problems by refusing to handle certain business banking accounts of “prominent persons”, perhaps pre-empting that the Bill would receive Presidential assent and thus earning the ire of Minister Zwane “in his personal capacity”.

Whether the FIC Bill might get further to the very roots of the party funding system is another matter but for the moment the focus was on “prominent persons” and the necessity to get the banks into action in terms of the law.

Meanwhile, the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry will continue to debate the “Twin Peaks” legislation which will again tighten up on banking and financial procedures on both regulatory and prudential aspects. But here again, there might be delays.

Previous articles on category subject
Red tape worries with FIC Bill – ParlyReportSA
Parliament, ConCourt and Business – ParlyReportSA
PIC comes under pressure to disclose – ParlyReportSA

Posted in cabinet, earlier editorials, Finance, economic, Home Page Slider, LinkedIn, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament awaits to hear from Cabinet

Same Parliament, same Cabinet, different mood

..editorial……Parliament has now resumed with the same Cabinet, the same 400 MPs, the same ANC Allianceparliament 6 majority instructed whips and the same names in the party benches but the ambiance is very different.     This subtle fact, however, matters little in the immediate future.   Legislation before the National Assembly (NA) will still be subject to a simple numbers game when it comes to voting. Well, almost.

In the case of a Section 76 Bill, that is a Bill that needs not merely the concurrence of that portion of the 400 MPs that sit in the NCOP but subject to full debate by all nine provinces and a mandate returned in favour or not, there might be the beginnings of healthier opposition. Power at local level has been emboldened since Parliament last met.

So far, matters of consequence have been that the Department of Energy has presented its REIPPP plan with support from most other than Eskom with no Minister present and the Mineral Resources Portfolio Committee has re-endorsed a revised Minerals and Petroleum  Resources Development Amendment Bill for process by the NCOP using its ANC majority. Again no Minister was present. Eskom will be presenting on this and matters regarding coal any day.

Old tricks

jacob zumaHowever, presuming the picture in Parliament stays as it is until the 2019 national election with Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma at the helm as President, it will be interesting to see what type and how much legislation is hammered through the NA by the ANC using the same old tactic of deploying party whips with threats of being moved down on the party list system for a total majority, timed last year in a rush just before a recess.

Notably, now in the case of three Bills sent for assent after being voted through, the three were not signed by President Zuma into law acting on legal advice.

With this trio now back with Parliament on the grounds of either suspected unconstitutionality and/or incorrect parliamentary procedure, the issue is now whether the coterie of Cabinet Ministers that surround the President, with Director Generals appointed by and who report to those Ministers, will take Parliament more seriously.

Not hearing

Good advice is not good advice when it comes in the form of a last minute warning not to put signature to any Bill thereby turning it into an Act of law. Plenty of such advice not do this in respect of a number of Bills was previously given during parliamentary portfolio committee debate, at parliamentary public hearings from affected institutions, business and industry and even earlier in public comment when the Bills were first published by gazette in draft form.

Similarly, the lesson seems not to be learnt in higher echelons that the independent regulatory entities are also not to be ignored – institutions from the Office of the Public Prosecutor to ICASA, from NERSA through to the board of the Central Energy Fund and from National Treasury to international courts, the UN and international bodies protecting human rights. Parliament is due to hear from ICASA any moment.

Most worrying, however, are the attempts to by-pass Treasury when presenting policy to Parliament. Ideological bullying can bankrupt a country in no time.

Such issues as Minister Aaron Motsoaledi’s National Health Insurance dream and Minister Joemat-Pettersson/President Jacob’s Zuma’s dream of six nuclear energy reactors – plans that the country should not possibly not countenance from a financial aspect – have neither been presented to Parliament in the proper national budget planning form or officially and financially endorsed.

Missing money details

Minister of Health, Aaron Motsoaledi, has gone as far as a White Paper to Parliament on the NHI and Minister Joemat-Pettersson has briefed Parliament on nuclear tendering. Treasury have said nothing about a financial plan in each case. Money is short, as evidenced by Treasury stepping in on the provisions for BEE preferential procurement. Somewhere there is a disconnect.

As for President Zuma’s continued pressure to bring traditional leaders into the equation with what amounts to two separate judicial systems and has even talked of the equivalent of four tiers of government – one therefore not even reporting to Parliament and certainly no idea of local government and nor subject to the PMFA  has its problems. President Zuma has used his ally, the Minister of Justice, to table the Traditional Courts Bill before Parliament. Opposition parties will walk out on that one, we are sure.

The Speaker of the House, Baleka Mbete, as part of the same coterie, has made a mild signal that the days of Cabinet maverick behaviour, even arrogance, towards Parliament and no respect for the separation of powers may be coming to an end. The SACP is clearly not happy. That is where the new ambiance felt in an unchanged Parliament may play an unofficial part and pressure may start building.

 
Previous articles on category subject
Parliament to open Aug 16 – ParlyReportSA
Parliament under siege – ParlyReportSA
Radical White Paper on NHI published – ParlyReportSA
Zuma’s nuclear energy call awaits Treasury – ParlyReportSA
Here it comes again…. the Traditional Courts Bill – ParlyReportSA

Posted in cabinet, earlier editorials, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Justice, constitutional, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Parliament rattled by Sizani departure

Closed ranks on Sizani resignation…..

As South Africa struggles with the backlash of having had three finance ministers rotated in four days and
Stone-Sizani-XXX-news echoes around the parliamentary precinct that the Chief Whip of the ANC has resigned, there is a palpable feeling amongst MPs that all is not well within the governing party. The resignation of Hon Stone Sizani has come at a bad time.

Also, the legislation that is zeroed in at Parliament at the moment clearly indicates that President Zuma cares much about the rural vote and knows full well that in the months before the municipal elections that this is the power base that must be focused upon politically. His recent statement that land reform will be backdated to the 1800s manifests this view.

Team spirit

But then much of the political rhetoric at the moment is typical of a pre-election period. This has unfortunately arisen at a time that the country is on a knife’s edge in terms of both financial ratings and a possible increase in interest rates.

cropped-sa-parliament-2.jpgThe dilemma being experienced in parliamentary meetings at the moment is how to turn the ever apparent failure of government departments to meet their targets and constant reminders that projects have not even arrived at tender stage into the positive spin called for by business heads to kick start team spirit and overcome the country’s difficulties by creating more jobs.

The fact is that the parliamentary process calls for oversight of government activities and criticism is an essential part of any debate. It therefore becomes difficult to walk the fine line between exposing obvious failure and unwarranted expenditure at a time when the country needs only good news.

Good news

Maybe, it would be good then to report, as we hereby do, that the meeting between business heads and President Zuma has produced a positive reaction amongst most parliamentarians, except of course the EFF and extreme Left. It has produced the re-emergence of the MPRDA Bill, sadly without the scrapping of the Private Security Industry Bill. It has seen some excellent plans emerging in the world of SOEs and public utilities.

It has also seen the re-emergence of positive statements of progress in transport, roads and the positive fact that Eskom has reported to Parliament that it feels it can make it without load shedding at the tariff figure fixed by Nersa. Also the rush to spend enormous figures on nuclear power has been slowed down.

Certainly it is good to see at most meetings reference made to the saving of unnecessary expenditure and an acceptance by most in Parliament that things cannot go on as they were.

Posted in earlier editorials, Earlier Stories0 Comments

Special cabinet statement might correct damage to SA

Editorial…..

At last, a sensible special cabinet statement……

Sent to clients 15 Jan…On 13 January, a Special Cabinet Statement was issued and, as compared to previous irregular missives, the word “special” indicated some hope.   Instead of just containing the usual reasons for having to rejoice on certain public holidays, details of the passing of MK operatives and certain Bills approved, the latest document was full of economic facts and financial fiscal information placing a positive spin on the current economic gloom. At last, an acknowledgement that there is a hand on the tiller.

Clearly there has been a palace revolution, if only in this sphere alone.

As the Cabinet Lekgotla is planned, Parliament also prepares to receive it’s parliamentarians all fresh from the respective political party get-to-gethers. A lot has changed since they all parted company and quite likely a lot more is to change before MPs gather for their first meetings.

No doubt the EFF will try to make a circus out of things but nevertheless the show will go on.    However, EFF or not, it is becoming more and more difficult to sort out between political comment, which is not our focus, and the mechanics of State policy and its direction, oversight on financial issues and legislative alerts that affect business and industry.

Bad four days

Rob-DaviesRed lights are flashing in all camps, not least of which is the fact that it is difficult to tell who did the most damage to South African markets – China or President Zuma. In parliamentary terms, the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry seems determined to stand by SACP Minister of Trade Industry, Dr Rob Davies, in all matters dealing with BEE and trade agreements- as does DTI itself – and the Public Works Portfolio Committee seems unable to wear down SACP Minister, Jeremy Cronin, on issues regarding the Expropriation Bill.

Similarly, Lumka Yengeni’s Portfolio Committee on Labour Committee has no hope of a good outcome when it ordered, in the last session, an end to the shambles and confusion in Minister Mildred Oliphant’s Department of Labour, another Kwa-Zulu appointee of President Jacob Zuma.

Always a problem

Finally, despite some excellent MPs from all parties sitting in the Portfolio Committee on Energy, the vague report backs made to them by Department of Energy is leading to a sense of frustration in that particular Portfolio Committee which is not effective either as a result. In the area of good communications, Minister of Energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson can only be described as a menace.

The good news is that stalwart ANC Joanmariae Fubbs remains Chairperson of the Trade and Industry Portfolio Committee  and holds the ship steady with her disciplines. SACP executive Yunus Carrim stays as Chairperson of the Standing Committee on Finance and one wonders if he will see eye to eye in view of his ideologies with Minister Pravin Gordhan.

Overlooked as well

A Jacob Zuma appointee, Ebrahim Patel of COSATU fame but a hard worker and very leftist, remains Minister ofebrahim patel Economic Affairs but even he was overlooked for Minister of Finance when the President came up with name of David van Rooyen, who, to be quite frank, we had great difficulty in recalling his presence in Parliament over the last few months. A close shave but costly.

Back onto legislation. Whatever happened to the Private Security Industry Bill nobody knows but one hopes that the President was not using it to play silly games with the Obama administration on the AGOA issue. Maybe it gets discussed at the Lekgotla. Maybe not.

Politics ahead of economics 

In the meanwhile, one hopes that the message is got through at the Cabinet Lekgotla that what the President says vitally affects each one of his citizens and that that the private and personal politics being played out at the moment are particularly damaging to the business of Parliament and its relationship with commerce and industry.

Just as importantly, there has to be a better understanding in government departments when reporting to Parliament why business institutions need clarity of policy to gain investment confidence.

opening parliamentParliament is an important and independent tool of democracy in the fight against autocracy but so many departments seem more in awe of the auditor general than they are of the need for answers to parliamentary questioning and attempts to get the truth.

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President Zuma calls for 2012 as year of infrastructure

President Zuma, speaking during his state of the nation address in Parliament, declared 2012 to be the year of infrastructure development and that a presidential infrastructure coordinating commission (PICC) is to be set up in September, as planned in a cabinet lekgotla last July, to implement the plan.

Five major projects have been identified by state owned enterprises as well as involving national, provincial and local government departments.

  • Rail, road & water projects in Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West provinces
  • Durban-Free State-Gauteng industrial corridor-including reducing port charges
  • South eastern node, including a dam on the Umzimvubu River
  • Water, roads, rail & electricity infrastructure development in the North West
  • West coast developments & expansion of iron ore line Sishen /Saldanha Bay

President Zuma said the plan would also contribute towards industrialisation, skills development and job creation and that a summit would be called for potential investors and social partners to interact on the possibilities of participating.

He added that a presidential infrastructure summit will be held where potential investors and social partners can interact with government on the plan.  Hospitals and nurses’ homes would also be refurbished as part of preparations for the national health insurance system and new universities built in Mpumalanga and Northern Cape.

On other legislative issues, he promised conclusion of the long outstanding matter of labour broking and changes to labour law amendment bills sitting at the moment with NEDLAC; a Women Empowerment and Gender Equality Bill in draft and matters regarding the land reform process, particularly with regard to re-writing  the willing buyer – willing seller process. Traditional affairs matters, he said, also had to be dealt with in this regard.

Costs of the infrastructure plan and how this will come about as a financial plan, are fleshed out in the Budget from minister of finance, Pravin Gordhan, presented subsequently on 22 February.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Finance, economic, Labour, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Uncategorized0 Comments


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  • PIC comes under pressure to disclose

    Unlisted investments of PIC queried…. When asked for information on how the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) had invested its funds, Dr  Daniel Matjila, Chief Executive Officer, told parliamentarians that the most […]

  • International Arbitration Bill to replace BITs

    Arbitration Bill gets SA in line with UNCTRAL ….. The tabling of the International Arbitration Bill in Parliament will see ‘normalisation’ on a number of issues regarding arbitration between foreign companies […]

  • Parliament rattled by Sizani departure

    Closed ranks on Sizani resignation….. As South Africa struggles with the backlash of having had three finance ministers rotated in four days and news echoes around the parliamentary precinct that […]

  • Protected Disclosures Bill: employer to be involved

    New Protected Disclosures Bill ups protection…. sent to clients 21 January……The Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Affairs will shortly be debating the recently tabled Protected Disclosures Amendment Bill which proposes a duty […]