Tag Archive | ICASA

Parliament awaits to hear from Cabinet

Same Parliament, same Cabinet, different mood

..editorial……Parliament has now resumed with the same Cabinet, the same 400 MPs, the same ANC Allianceparliament 6 majority instructed whips and the same names in the party benches but the ambiance is very different.     This subtle fact, however, matters little in the immediate future.   Legislation before the National Assembly (NA) will still be subject to a simple numbers game when it comes to voting. Well, almost.

In the case of a Section 76 Bill, that is a Bill that needs not merely the concurrence of that portion of the 400 MPs that sit in the NCOP but subject to full debate by all nine provinces and a mandate returned in favour or not, there might be the beginnings of healthier opposition. Power at local level has been emboldened since Parliament last met.

So far, matters of consequence have been that the Department of Energy has presented its REIPPP plan with support from most other than Eskom with no Minister present and the Mineral Resources Portfolio Committee has re-endorsed a revised Minerals and Petroleum  Resources Development Amendment Bill for process by the NCOP using its ANC majority. Again no Minister was present. Eskom will be presenting on this and matters regarding coal any day.

Old tricks

jacob zumaHowever, presuming the picture in Parliament stays as it is until the 2019 national election with Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma at the helm as President, it will be interesting to see what type and how much legislation is hammered through the NA by the ANC using the same old tactic of deploying party whips with threats of being moved down on the party list system for a total majority, timed last year in a rush just before a recess.

Notably, now in the case of three Bills sent for assent after being voted through, the three were not signed by President Zuma into law acting on legal advice.

With this trio now back with Parliament on the grounds of either suspected unconstitutionality and/or incorrect parliamentary procedure, the issue is now whether the coterie of Cabinet Ministers that surround the President, with Director Generals appointed by and who report to those Ministers, will take Parliament more seriously.

Not hearing

Good advice is not good advice when it comes in the form of a last minute warning not to put signature to any Bill thereby turning it into an Act of law. Plenty of such advice not do this in respect of a number of Bills was previously given during parliamentary portfolio committee debate, at parliamentary public hearings from affected institutions, business and industry and even earlier in public comment when the Bills were first published by gazette in draft form.

Similarly, the lesson seems not to be learnt in higher echelons that the independent regulatory entities are also not to be ignored – institutions from the Office of the Public Prosecutor to ICASA, from NERSA through to the board of the Central Energy Fund and from National Treasury to international courts, the UN and international bodies protecting human rights. Parliament is due to hear from ICASA any moment.

Most worrying, however, are the attempts to by-pass Treasury when presenting policy to Parliament. Ideological bullying can bankrupt a country in no time.

Such issues as Minister Aaron Motsoaledi’s National Health Insurance dream and Minister Joemat-Pettersson/President Jacob’s Zuma’s dream of six nuclear energy reactors – plans that the country should not possibly not countenance from a financial aspect – have neither been presented to Parliament in the proper national budget planning form or officially and financially endorsed.

Missing money details

Minister of Health, Aaron Motsoaledi, has gone as far as a White Paper to Parliament on the NHI and Minister Joemat-Pettersson has briefed Parliament on nuclear tendering. Treasury have said nothing about a financial plan in each case. Money is short, as evidenced by Treasury stepping in on the provisions for BEE preferential procurement. Somewhere there is a disconnect.

As for President Zuma’s continued pressure to bring traditional leaders into the equation with what amounts to two separate judicial systems and has even talked of the equivalent of four tiers of government – one therefore not even reporting to Parliament and certainly no idea of local government and nor subject to the PMFA  has its problems. President Zuma has used his ally, the Minister of Justice, to table the Traditional Courts Bill before Parliament. Opposition parties will walk out on that one, we are sure.

The Speaker of the House, Baleka Mbete, as part of the same coterie, has made a mild signal that the days of Cabinet maverick behaviour, even arrogance, towards Parliament and no respect for the separation of powers may be coming to an end. The SACP is clearly not happy. That is where the new ambiance felt in an unchanged Parliament may play an unofficial part and pressure may start building.

 
Previous articles on category subject
Parliament to open Aug 16 – ParlyReportSA
Parliament under siege – ParlyReportSA
Radical White Paper on NHI published – ParlyReportSA
Zuma’s nuclear energy call awaits Treasury – ParlyReportSA
Here it comes again…. the Traditional Courts Bill – ParlyReportSA

Posted in cabinet, earlier editorials, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Justice, constitutional, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Broadband allocation could involve SABC

ICT White Paper to set up broadband allocation…

An Integrated ICT White Paper involving broadband allocation is in its final stages of preparation involvingSiyabonga Cweley consultation with various parties, said Telecommunications and Postal Services Minister, Siyabonga Cwele, during his Budget vote speech to Parliament.  This matter is a long outstanding issue in the industry and delays are imperiling broadband development.

What has concerned Opposition members during earlier parliamentary meetings on the subject was the remark by the Minister that “Some of the delay has been the delay to allow the Department of Communications to make a contribution to the decision regarding allocation across the spectrum and how this would be applied.”

This remark must be seen in the light of the fact that the two ministries and departments were split some five years ago and the conclusion is that Minister Faith Muthambi and the SABC under it’s new and controversial head of broadcasting, Hlaudi Motsoeneng, has been drawn into the equation.

Minister Cwele also said at the time that also added that his Ministry was working with Treasury to establish a “funding model” for the broadband “roll out”, estimated at R67bn.

Spectrum policy included

In his budget speech, Minister Cwele re-affirmed that the White Paper would be supported by a new Spectrum Policy Paper in order to provide for “open or public access networks and opening up the use of high demand broadband spectrum for use by all licensees while adequately compensating those who invest in infrastructure.   All South Africans must benefit from participation in the digital society, he said.                                  ‘

Until now, there have been a number of unfortunate reasons for the holdup in broadband which have been given by government in parliamentary meetings to date. With both DTPS and Minister Cwele present at the most recent parliamentary meeting before Parliament with ICASA as the regulatory body also  present, it became quite evident  that the two were at loggerheads on the manner and method of spectrum allocation.

Different signals

Minister Cwele, during the portfolio meeting, prioritised his department’s requirement as being the need to

transform the sector to ensure meaningful Black participation when allocation takes place. ICASA meanwhile placed far less emphasis on this, preferring an allocation on an “auction” basis style whereby bidders not only name their price but declared their additional contributions to Black upliftment and general social and community development programmes, knowing this would more likely attract outside investors.

Dr. Cwele admitted at the time that “broadband allocation is perhaps the biggest regulatory bottleneck in the South African deployment of wireless technologies at the moment.”

Minister says industry “monopolistic”

In his subsequent budget vote speech he notably remarked, “Radical supply side interventions will reduce barriers to investors by moving away  from monopolistic infrastructure allowing for competition in opening access tobroadband broadband networks”.

The Minister told MPs in his speech that the White Paper will provide for “a simplified, streamlined and nationally coordinated framework to accelerate the use of networks meaning, he said, a capability to “drastically reduce the costs to operators and, down the line, to consumers.”

This issue has been plaguing the South Africa consumer market for a number of years, he added, and it was widely accepted that with the growth of cell phone usage by all income groups, he said, the present pricing cannot continue at the expense of ordinary households.

Domestic WiFi roaming

Separately, private sector operators such as Cisco have said that any such move will present mobile operators intelecommunications South Africa with a tremendous opportunity to optimize capital and operational expenditures and improve user experience.

From discussion after the Minister had spoken, it emerged also from MPs that the more mobile data offloaded makes viable alternative to mobile broadband users in crowded locations such as shopping malls where spectrum availability for present mobile access to networks is limited.   In addition, it was noted that a bigger data offload will give operators the opportunity to reduce data costs, allowing them to accelerate adoption of competitive market share opportunities. The Minister made no comment on this and it was clear that the BEE component was a ministry priority.

Crosscutting in government

HlengiweMkhizeThe Deputy Minister of Telecommunications and Posts, Hlengiwe Mkhize, followed up the Minister in her address to the committee by focusing on “discussions taking place with the labour, public service and administration and higher education and training departments to boost ICT skills.”    She also mentioned that the White Paper would map out some of the internet connectivity plans for the rural economy to stimulate growth and opportunities.

In response to both Minister’s briefings, the following day in debate Opposition members said as far as the public service use of broadband was concerned in all aspects of communications, health and education, “it was time for the discussions to stop withe other departments and for the roll out to begin.”

 MPs noted the comment that out of 46 African countries surveyed, the cheapest mobile prepaid product in South Africa is still nearly 7.5 times more expensive than the African continent’s cheapest similar product.   The South African government is one of the smallest users of broadband facilities in the world, according to Cape Town based Research ICT Africa.

 Previous articles on category subject  

Broadband allocation on its way – ParlyReportSA

Govt and Nersa differ on broadband – ParlyReportSA

Overhaul of broadband policy underway – ParlyReportSA

Parliament gets final dates for digital TV – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Communications, Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Security,police,defence, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Broadband allocation on its way

Minister wants BEE ownership in broadband…..

sent to clients 20 March….As if nobody knew already, the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services,cwele Dr Siyabonga Cwele, told Parliament that broadband allocation is perhaps the biggest regulatory bottleneck in the South African deployment of wireless technologies.     He said, at the same time, he wants to see Black owned companies have their fair share of allocation.

However, both he or his department (DTPS) and the regulatory body ICASA seem to be at odds on the system needed to allocate the spectrum, particularly in the area of setting aside sufficient spectrum to support Black broadband development and ownership specifically.    The fight to deliver urgently more high-speed bandwidth to South Africans generally is being slowed down it seems by this difference in opinion expressed.

global broad bandPresumably, the delay is all about whose satellites we use – Chinese, Russians or the US accompanied by an intelligence risk – or do we go via the masts owned by the private sector. Minister Cwele probably suspects any such deal with the private sector will not serve black interests in the proper manner. Digging trenches and laying down optic line cannot be any kind of answer.  In telecommunications all is political, rather like the nuclear issue and the similar problems faced by department of energy – the political structure overlays the practical answer.

Dr Cwele has now said the final policy paper is on its way to Cabinet.

One on one

In an extraordinary meeting with the Portfolio Committee on Telecommunications and Postal Services, both parties explained their views with the views of MPs to be added to what has become a national debate dominated to an extent by Minister Cwele’s views.

The background to the impasse is that the Electronic Communications Act empowers the Minister to issue policy directives but ICASA does not necessarily have to accept such. To distill the views of each into a few words is difficult but clearly the driving principle behind Dr. Cwele’s approach is an allocation which favours black transformation in control of spectrum whereas ICASA prefers an allocation more on an “auction” basis, whereby bidders not only name their price but then add their additional contributions to Black upliftment and general social development.

cell phone mast graphicVodacom, MTN, Telkom, Cell C and Neotel have in the past sunk enormous sums into the development of communications structures but the current delays in allocation are, according to reports, hurting the industry but their BEE structures are shallow, say insiders.

Dedicated view

Industry sources said before the meeting “Minister Cwele is seized with the need to transform the sector to ensure meaningful Black participation but spectrum allocation cannot be granted in the same way as the granting of concessionary mining licences, for example, if Black empowerment is the goal.”

The principles of the allocation process as stated by DTPS are indeed noble, as quoted in the relevant draft Policy Paper before Parliament, which state that the aims of the allocation policy are to:

• Promote the effective and efficient management of spectrum to ensure
  agility, flexibility and adaptability in spectrum administration
• Reduce bureaucracy and streamline processes for spectrum assignment
• Support the attainment of the national broadband targets set out in the
  South Africa Connect programme at speeds and in the time frame outlined
• Provide clarity on the treatment of spectrum in instances where demand exceeds supply
• Set aside spectrum for use on an open access basis with joint private sector investment
• Support the provision of, emergency services, safety and security and sector-specific operations

Milder

In the parliamentary debate, Sipho Mjwara, Acting DG, DTPS, was more conciliatory and said the spectrum was a public resource belonging to all people and DTPS had to apply itself on how to deal with this for the benefit of all. Currently the spectrum was operating on a first come, first serve basis but this principle certainly did not benefit all. He said there were “barriers to entry for small companies and artificial monopolies helped little.”

This was followed by comment from the Deputy Minister, Prof Hlengiwe Mkhize, who said it was “more logical” not to shrink away from exercising the mandate of DTPS to follow the NDP on broadband roll out. “The pillars that need to be in place must include those that had previously been excluded”.

Money must talk

Pakamile Pongwana, CEO of ICASA, responded that from an international perspective it was no longer the policy,icasa ceo as had been the case in the past, of getting maximum fees into the fiscus but the needs of complete coverage of the country. It was a combination of coverage and fees, Pongwana said.

Germany had raised money from the spectrum divide, he said, but they had included a proviso that bandwidth would only be released when rural areas had been covered. He added that other countries were already looking at 5G networks while South Africa was still looking at LTE use. “We have to stop playing catch-up”, he said.

War of words

From the debate between all groups, DTPS, ICASA and parliamentarians, it became obvious that there is an ideological battle going on. The industry sees the independence of ICASA as regulator at stake, industry sources say. The Minister said he had looked at the idea of the allocation of “set asides” for high demand spectrum but added “the Department wants the whole pie to be available for all South Africans. We are in a situation where a duopoly owns 80% of the spectrum.”

However Pongwana concluded, “The allocation of spectrum was the country’s policy choice and the assignment would be by the Regulator and be in line with procedures. While there was long term licensee allocation there was short term spectrum allocation and the Department wanted to give certainty to licensees.”

Money, money, money

moneyOn the question of infrastructure spend, DDG for ICT Infrastructure in the DTPS, summarised government views in the meeting when he said that in a country like South Africa with infrastructure and access gaps, the question had to be asked whether the country wanted to raise money as its main goal. He said it was more about service and reaching all South Africans as part of the NDP but in an equitable manner.”

Whether it would be for free or go to the highest bidder were questions the DTPS was considering as it looked at all approaches. It would probably not be for free, he said, but there had to be a compromise where small companies are not at the mercy of big companies “because of market power relations.”

The Minister concluded that all in DTPS were listening to the views of the public and industry.

Ministerial clusters.

The next step before submission of the new Spectrum Policy to Cabinet during March was to consult with the particular clusters as part of the ICT Policy White Paper procedure. Once the Spectrum Policy had been approved by Cabinet and gazetted as part of the ICT White Paper, ICASA could proceed with the licensing process on the agreed basis.
Previous articles on category subject
Lack of skills hampering broadband rollout – ParlyReportSA
Overhaul of broadband policy underway – ParlyReportSA

Posted in BEE, Communications, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Government communications accused of promoting ANC

Department of communications accused of cloning ANC slogans…..

country wants youThe opposition has complained that the department of communications (DoC) and government communications information services (GCIS) are using ANC party slogans for a DoC communications and PR campaigns, such campaigns costing millions of rands.

The complaint was lodged by Gavin Davis, DA member of the parliamentary portfolio committee on communications and a DA whip, during a presentation by DoC on progress of setting up the newly reconstituted DOC with new responsibilities and reporting at the same time ion liaison with the similarly, newly re-constituted department of telecommunications & postal services (DTPS).

Brand South Africa had moved from department of public service to DoC, it was reported.   SABC remained with DOC; the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA), previously reporting direct to a minister was now with DOC as well, and the Films and Publications Board (FPB) moved from department of home affairs. Also, important was the transfer of the (GCIS) to DoC.

At the same time, parliamentarians were told of the new mandates on matters related to the Independent Communications Authority of SA (ICASA), some of which were in the area of broadband and telecommunications and therefore had to remain with DPST. 

Hot under the collar

It was in the discussion and questions on the campaigns of Brand SA, using the combined power of this re-organisation together with the communications strategies of GCIS, that most of the questions arose. At various points the meeting became quite heated. on the issue of slogans and party posters.  Present was the deputy minister of communications, Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams, who could be seen at times to be visibly angry under questioning.

tv flat screenPresented by the DDG of communications, Gift Buthelezi, was a progress report of the national communication strategy, which included details of the processes to be used, media deployed and messages to be conveyed in the communications campaign of Brand SA aimed at the South African public.  The objective was “to increase pride in being a South African”.

Upfront minister

stella abrahamsDeputy minister Ndabeni-Abrahams took it upon herself to answer 95% of the questions asked during question time on the various presentations made, not the director general.   

On a number of occasions the debate reached the level of a public spat, particularly on the questions surrounding statements made in the presentations at the meeting which conflicted with statements made by senior executives of the SABC at different times and on different occasions.

First, shadow minister of communications, Gavin Davis, complained that the line adopted by the DoC campaign for all government departments and media placings, “Together We Move South Africa Forward”, was in fact an ANC slogan and used at the recent ANC conference. He said the DoC was clearly bringing party politics into government spending.

Good news

ANC athen added that the ANC had fielded a successful electoral manifesto to the whole country at the election based on this line and therefore took this as a mandate for government to also adopt this “because obviously this was what the majority wanted. She said DoC had plenty of “good news” to impart.

They (the public) had said so when they voted”, she said, and emphasised that there was nothing “sinister in this”. “Togetherness and pride in South Africa”, she added, were the key neutral expressions being used to shape the campaign, she said.

ANC members argued that pride in South Africa could be encouraged by sports events, regular communications on subjects that affected the ordinary citizen focused on the “good news”, such as cleaning up corruption and government successes.

Gavin Davis (DA) then asked the minister how DoC, as a government department, could possibly involve itself in building up such issues as “pride”. He said that pride in one’s country was a personal issue and it was not the job of a government to manipulate this feeling with what might be described as propaganda.

He also said it was impossible to neither measure such things as “pride” nor manipulate the emotion and called for detail on how this could be achieved with PR campaigns when such issues were governed or frustrated against a background of political and economic facts, which at this time were far from good.

Gupta’s “New Age”

Davis said he was also unsatisfied by the answer given to his question as to why R10m should be spent on the publication New Age for advertising when they only had some 10,000 readers and queried the media spend in general. The answer given was stated by Davis as being “totally undecipherable”.

He also asked for clarification on the statement made by DoC that a 70% quota of what was published and broadcast had to be “localised”, DoC having emphasised local news would be disseminated in future as a priority as distinct from international news. 

sabc news logoMinister Ndabeni-Abrahams said she did not necessarily agree with SABC editorial policy on this issue, the  SABC management being quoted by Davis as having said that SABC will in future broadcast the good news which would be local news”.   The minister said her earlier  statement, and that of DoC, was that  a figure of 70% for local news was the correct one.   Davies then asked if she were prepared to tell the SABC this fact.

At this stage minister refused to answer any more questions on the subject and accused the opposition of being provocative.

Other articles in this category or as background
Overhaul of broadband policy underway – ParlyReportSA
Communications bill awaited setting up consumer body – ParlyReport
More state powers for ICASA proposed – ParlyReportSA

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More state powers for ICASA proposed

ICASA to get policing role

Parliament has met to consider a proposal to convert the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), the regulator of the communications world, into an industry “watchdog”  in order to ensure adherence to government policy. The portfolio committee on communications is currently considering a mandate to bring forward a proposal for ICASA to become an Institution Supporting Democracy (ISD).   In terms of section 181(1) of the Constitution of South Africa there is provision for the establishment of ISDs in order “to strengthen constitutional democracy”. In debate, the committee indicated examples of such institutions as the Office of the Auditor General, the Office of the Public Protector, the Public Service Commission, the Human Rights Commission and the Commission for Gender Equality in this category.

Committee upset

Failure of the CEO of ICASA, former Vodacom executive, Pakamile Pongwana, to arrive for the parliamentary meeting in question considerably upset MPs.     Pongwana,  previously a deputy DG for telecommunications policy in the previous department of communications, was heavily criticized for his absence, with  MPs commenting that he “should know the ropes and be here “.   Chair, Joyce Moloi-Moropa  said in her view “the situation was unacceptable. What could be  more important to a CEO than the future of his institution?”, she asked. In debating the issue, ANC parliamentarians felt that the move would have the effecting of upgrading the role of the institution from one of a communications regulator to an entity that could become a ‘watchdog’ in order to ensure that the communications sector in general adhered to the “principal pillars of South Africa’s democracy.” Opposition members, however,  noted with concern that the proposals could enable “a dispensation where government through ICASA would have increasing control over the entire communications sector ranging from telecoms, radio, to TV and even print media”.

All too powerful

The possible change in the status of ICASA follows the decision of President Zuma upon the commencement of his new government to split the communications  portfolio between the previous broader department of communications and a new telecommunications and postal services department appointed with a separate minister. Stakeholders in the industry have complained in the media that such a move could have serious repercussions for  business and the investment climate, since  general uncertainty would be the result of granting too much power to a state entity at the expense of the private sector, bearing in mind that state utilities controlled many factors in  the industry. Following this  initial parliamentary debate, an amendment to the anchor legislation, the ICASA Act would be the next step, say commentators.   This would involve the normal process of public hearings and deliberations thus providing an opportunity for concerned parties and stakeholders to make input and comment. Other articles in this category http://parlyreportsa.co.za//communications/communications-bill-sets-up-consumer-body/ http://parlyreportsa.co.za//communications/parliament-gets-final-dates-digital-tv/

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Communication Bills tabled in Parliament

Cleaning up on communications….

Following their cabinet approval two communication Bills have now been tabled in Parliament; firstly, the Electronic Communications Amendment Bill and secondly, the Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) Amendment Bill.

The first named, Electronic Communications Amendment Bill, is very much a regulatory Bill, the background stating that the proposed legislation was “in line with the liberalisation process of the electronic communications sector and rapid technological advancements which have rendered some of the Act’s provisions redundant.”

Needed overhaul

It says, “Because it was the first such law, over time it has become obvious that certain provisions are not capable of implementation in the way that was intended or do not have the intended effect when applied. There are also areas of ambiguity and vagueness which hamper efficient and effective regulation.”

The Bill deals with competition, promotion and limitation; access to electronic communications infrastructure; communication costs; as well as “improving turnaround time for consultative processes”. It also proposes “to incorporate the authority’s recommendation on ownership and control of commercial broadcasting services.”

The document says the Bill is aligned with broad-based black economic empowerment legislation; refines licensing issues and wishes to improve competition provisions and remove regulatory bottlenecks.

ICASA Bill follows NDP

The second Bill, the ICASA Amendment Bill, is focused, it says, on the National Development Plan; clarifies some of the powers and duties of ICASA; lines up with the Public Finance Management Act and focuses on institutional improvements to strengthen the financial and administrative independence of the authority.

Importantly, the legality of networks and services for electronic transactions is confirmed. Also, “mechanisms”, the background to the Bill says, are proposed to ensure accountability of ICASA staff and its councillors.

Finally, a full commission is proposed to handle complaints as distinct from the current ICASA complaints committee.

Posted in Communications, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Communications bill awaited setting up consumer body

Communications Bill awaiting tabling….

Dina PuleA draft communications bill probably to be entitled the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa Amendment Bill, published in late 2012 for public comment is awaited in the form of a tabling by Minister Dina Pule.

The primary purpose of the proposed bill from the documents published for comment it seems is to set up a complaints and compliance commission (CCC) as a separate body from the independent communications authority of South Africa (ICASA) and thus gain consumer impartiality.

Electronic transactions the focus

The Bill also proposes a number of important provisions regarding electronic communications networks and services used in electronic transactions.   Mechanisms are also introduced to ensure the accountability of committees, ICASA and their councillors and for ICASA to relate more closely to the Public Finance Management Act.

Early 2013 tabling

The public participation period was concluded before the end of December and the new parliamentary session should see this Bill tabled in the next few months.

Posted in Communications, Justice, constitutional, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Minister Pule lines up communications bills for the future

During media briefings in late January, communications minister Dina Pule said that the Electronic Communications Amendment Bill would be released for public comment during the first quarter of 2012 and March 2013 was the deadline for the changes that will overhaul much of the communications environment in South Africa

The draft was published in November 2011 for comment and withdrawn shortly afterwards and in the light of what was said, not only by the public sector but by opposition parliamentarians. The minister commented at the time that further consultation would take place within government.

The issues evolve around the role, powers and functions of the minister herself and her relationship with and the powers of ICASA, the independent regulatory body. Much discussion involves a very limited frequency spectrum and the exact wording regarding licences, the issuing thereof and conditions of revoking.

The most recent comment comes from the minister herself, who added in response to the Budget debate that further amendments would be subject to the national development plan. Much argument originally took place over how to differentiate between the functions of the ICASA council and the chief operations officer of the body itself.

The minister also finds herself deeply involved in banking regulatory matters due their infant, the Post Office, entering the banking world despite recent scandals regarding misappropriation of funds.   Legislation is expected shortly amending the anchor Post Office Bank Limited Act which came into effect in 2010 allowing this process.

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