Tag Archive | HIV/AIDS

New health regulations in place soon: DoH

Must precede world health HIV/AIDS conference….

precious matsosoDr  Precious Matsoso, Director General, Department of Health (DoH), has told Parliament that it is essential to have the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) in place before South Africa hosts the World AIDS Conference.

On the health agenda also in South Africa, she added, is a World Hospitals Conference and Regulatory Agencies Conference, in which case the existence of a working SAHPRA was almost obligatory.  Dr Matsoso was in Parliament to brief MPs on the DoH fourth quarter results.

Dr Matsoso has recently been elected as an Executive Board Member of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and, in addressing the portfolio committee on health, all MPs congratulated her They expressed value of her appointment to South Africa in the context of promoting health on the sub-continent.

Minister absent

Dr Aaron Motsoaledi, the Minister of Health, was away an overseas visit for what is undoubtedlyamotsoaledi DoH’s most important presentation of the year, the last quarter, and both departmental officials presenting and responses from parliamentarians were relatively upbeat on improvements in DoH performance results.

In reporting on the final quarter as far as performance and finance was concerned, Dr Matsoso advised that in the year under review, aggregate pre-audited spending so far was at 98.4% of the total budget of R30.8bn, i.e. R30.3 bn. The R489m not spent in the year was for a number of reasons but mainly because of staffing vacancies provided for but not filled.

In general, she said there had been “an overall improvement in spending and compliance, and tightened monitoring and evaluation both at national and provincial level.”

New drive for medical staff

hospital newAttracting qualified staff to serve in government health was still a major problem but she stated that DoH intended to publish magazines and undertake promotions that were to be part of a new image intended to represent the changes that were taking place in public health.

Major items covered in the DoH presentation included the overall integration of health services on a national basis; progress with the ten National Health Insurance (NHI) pilot programmes; the situation with regards to HIV/AIDS; improved access to community-based primary health care facilities; and progress with legislation, particularly the Medicines and Related Substances Amendment Bill.

Getting to grips with HIV virus

HIV and AIDS, TB and maternal child and women’s health was a separate programme  and DoH hadhiv aids logo recorded over 9.5 million HIV tests in the year under review. The year ended with a total of 3,103, 902 clients now registered on anti-retroviral treatment (ARVs).

In discussion with concerned MPs, it emerged the number of HIV positive cases was increasing.  The department acknowledged that was always going to be the case until changes occurred in people’s habits, the largest problem sector in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The highest incidence of HIV was amongst women between the ages of 15 and 24.

Clearly, the country was on top of AIDS as a disease with the use of ARVs but the unknown and major worry was incidence of unaware persons not knowing or not caring on how to avoid becoming victims of the HIV virus.   This was due to a variety of reasons, Dr Matsoso said, and she told members that “DoH had started a project aimed at showing young women how to take charge of their lives; how to negotiate with older men; and how to take decisions.”

TB prevalent but under control

On TB, the most worrying issue was the much publicised multi-drug resistant virus. Over 120 professional nurses in service had been trained to initiate MDR TB treatment. Matters were now under control.  In general terms on TB treatments, fifty  hospitals had been assessed on TB criteria and diagnosis.

In passing, Dr Matsoso added that 90% of correctional services centres were now conducting routine TB screening.  TB was still mainly associated, she said, with impairment of the immune system as a result of being HIV positive or for nutritional reasons, both issues being usually coupled together when dealing with those below the breadline.

Community stress factors

high blood hungerIn the area of primary care, various DoH heads of departments reported  and it became apparent that 169,418 people had been counselled and screened for high blood pressure, a major problem in high stress and impoverished  communities.

A start had been made on mental disorders by commencing a registry system and a mobile SMS application was being piloted in the three districts to improve reporting times for ARV treatments to chase up on irregular calls for treatment.

One system, also at pilot level, was called “MotherCall” and dealt with mother care and maternity issues on an SMS basis, especially where calls to clinics by patients were needed on a regular basis but this was found to be somewhat restrained by cell phone coverage in the deeper rural areas.

Almost malaria free

Only one malaria endemic district had reported any malaria cases, which had been dealt with withinmalaria 24 hours of diagnosis. In all areas, 837 645 high risk individuals had been vaccinated against influenza. A draft model for rehabilitation and disability services had been developed and was ready for discussion with stakeholders and presentation to the National Health Council.

There had been 985 cataract surgery operations for the poor without medical aid cover but this area was a growing problem and the cost of spectacles added to eyesight impairment issues, affecting mainly the poor as far as education was concerned.

Mum on NHI

Dr Matsoso seemed somewhat reluctant to talk on the monitoring and evaluation that had taken place in ten NHI pilot districts, probably because DOH had not finalised its White Paper on the subject and conducted its talks with National Treasury. She conceded, however, that recruitment of various categories of health practitioners needed for the NHI pilots had been below expectations.

A departmental spokesperson confirmed that a dispensing and distributing system for centralised chronic medicine had been implemented for three-quarters of the facilities in all ten NHI districts. A system was also being tested whereby monies paid by patients was retained by the unit involved in a self sustaining exercise and not remitted to National Treasury.

He said that in the past three years of the particular pilot, R1.3bn had been collected by 13 hospitals, R450.6m being collected and held for the year under review.

Infrastructure build

primary care clinicIn general, 700 primary health care facilities were under construction or being opened in the ten NHI districts and some 3,500 computers on LAN equipment had been distributed and installed amongst the pilot areas enabling systems to work in individual clinics and hospitals with networking within their particular environment.

Further on primary care and in order to reduce the maternal mortality rate, a 53.9% rate of ante-natal first visits before 20 weeks of pregnancy had been achieved, against a target of 65%. The actual maternal mortality rate had been 132.5 per 100 000 live births. This was very much a question of education programmes.

Nursing practices and qualifications

On nursing generally, a further departmental spokesperson on the issue confirmed that four regional nursing training centres, or pilot “colleges”, had been established and were functional in Mpumalanga, Limpopo, Gauteng and North West. However, no public nursing colleges had yet been accredited in terms of the new system announced since  the whole question of accreditation was still being debated with both stakeholders and nursing bodies. Most of this debate involves whether nurses in training should get or not het  “field training” after each level of training.

A Chief Nursing Officer had now taken on her duties in a new DoH post who had the critical job of dealing with the major investment and finance required to “train the trainers” bearing in mind all colleges must fall into the Higher Education specifications now required. The entire matter was going forward, however, she said.

NHI still in principle is alive and well

precious matsosoOn legislation, Dr Matsoso reported that the draft white paper on the forthcoming NHI Bill was ready to go to Cabinet; the Medicines and Related Substances Amendment Bill had been tabled and was going through the parliamentary process with public hearings completed; and amendments to the Traditional Health Practitioners Act had been proposed.

A regulatory impact assessment was being conducted on the draft Control of Marketing Alcohol Beverages Bill.

MPs raised the question of schools feeding which they stated was not ideal from a nutritional aspect.  Dr Matsoso agreed and said it was important to change the school feeding programme, as children should not be served just soup and bread. There was a need to look at whether the nutrition provided at ECDs, crèches and pre-schools was appropriate generally. She said she was aware of the problem and it was to be addressed.

The larger picture of health in SA

schools feedingAlso, at schools generally, she said, over 200,000 learners had been screened with resultant indications that as many as 54,000 schoolchildren with some sort of health problem or impairment existed that could affect basic education. These students could suffer in their approach to matriculation and subsequent job attainment. Nutritional problems and troubled backgrounds were at the forefront.

Drug “stockouts” still there

Dr Anban Pillay of DoH addressed the issue of “stock outs” and drug shortages and said that, on the whole, DoH facilities were unfortunately geared nationally just to treat patients, rather than explaining to them how the treatment programme worked. This was being addressed.

Dr Pillay said stock outs could be supplier problem, as well. There had been a time when suppliers were unable to supply as many as 168 items and there were was a contractual agreement in place usually requesting suppliers to advise immediately when they anticipated problems. In this case, the 168 items that suppliers were unable to supply were not available either in the private or public sectors.

Online with the world

medicines, pillsHe said that DoH had approached the WHO for a list of pre-qualified suppliers outside South Africa that could be considered and some stocks like Benzylpenicillin and Atropine had had to be flown in from other places. Dr Matsoso commented that in some cases the U.S., Canada, Australia, Europe and the U.K. could indicate that there was a general stock out problem worldwide.

In most cases, however, Dr Pillay said that stock outs were as a result of a local facility forgetting to order and would run out between orders but barcode systems and central stock controls had been upgraded and the whole question of stock outs was improving, he said.

A system on stock control using cell phone technology was expected to take over the manual system completely but currently, 600 clinics were linked to the SMS system and more would be linked. A call-free line for patients had been established for any patient to advise if they could not get drugs from a particular clinic. Over 20 000 items were stored in an emergency “buffer stock” in Centurion, Pretoria.

Other stock outs could occur when pharmaceutical manufacturing companies closed for factory maintenance at the same time resulting in shortages and DoH representatives said that this could be solved by common negation on maintenance certificate timings.

Ebola never an SA issue 

ebola SAFinally, Dr Matsoso  commented on the outbreak on the continent of Ebola.

DOH, she said, had provided humanitarian financial assistance for the recruitment of Cuban doctors to provide health services in Sierra Leone and had established a knowledge and information sharing platform on various areas of collaboration with Botswana, Uganda, Namibia and Ghana.

In local terms, DoH Primary Health Care Services had seen over-expenditure due to the appointment of 25 local environmental health practitioners in response to the Ebola outbreak as a precautionary measure.

Other articles in this category or as background
Health dept winning on HIV/AIDS therapy and TB – ParlyReportSA
State acknowledges responsibility to increase health staff
Competition Commission promises health care inquiry – ParlyReportSA
SA health welfare starts in small way – ParlyReportSA

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NHI to focus on better nursing, says DoH

Pilot NHI facilities to get IT systems

amotsoalediAn impassioned plea in Parliament by minister of health, Aaron Motsoaledi, when presenting the strategy and annual performance plan of the department health (DoH), that nursing in South Africa should return to “the old days” was received well across party lines during a meeting of the portfolio committee on health.

He said he did not like the current system whereby nurses were trained at university, gaining all their four coloured bars in one learning process before gaining practical experience in the various disciplines. What is going to happen he said, is to encourage a heightened understanding of patient care with more bedside experience during training, This led to a round of vocal support from all parliamentarians in the newly elected committee.

Practical qualifications

Dr Motsoaledi said that many nurses with four bars on their shoulder-tabs often had less practical nursing experience than some who only had one bar, meaning that less experience in the real basics of proper nursing care was becoming prevalent.

Change was now being instituted whereby each specialist phase in knowledge attainment would be coupled with a period of field training experience to gain a bar in order to return nursing to proper holistic care principles. Nursing training was to be returned to a seven year period to incorporate periods of field experience, rather than the current crash course system of four years.

He said to MPs that it was “very difficult to send a new highly qualified nurse on bedpan duties for her first duty.”   He received a strong endorsement of the new approach from a cross spectrum of all members. He told parliamentarians that five public nursing colleges would be accredited to offer nursing qualifications under a new system in 2014/5.

NHI will meet world standards

heathpatientDr Motsoaledi detailed all eight strategic goals of DoH and referred immediately to the national health scheme, the implementation of which he said was not “if” but “when”. South Africa’s NHI would meet international standards and use internationally accepted regulations, he said, but he did not answer directly a member’s question on a date when the pilot would end.

However, he expanded on the fact that the current NHI project, a project which involves 700 public health facilities, would be the subject of new patient registration systems with IT backup and electronic health care data collection.   The revised administration systems would reduce patient waiting time, he said, and in addition a mobile phone data collection and communication system was to be introduced.

He also said it was the intention of DoH to have a functional national pricing commission in place by 2017 in order to regulate health care in the private sector.   DoH would again revise methodology and also legislate for the determination of pharmaceutical dispensing fees.

Dr Motsoaledi told the committee that an Institute of Regulatory Sciences was to be introduced and regulations for the function of an Office of Health Standards Compliance to prescribe norms and standards brought into being.

He was adamant that nearly 4,000 primary health care facilities with functional committees and district hospital boards would be in place by 2018/9 and said that 75% of all primary health care clinics in the 52 health districts would qualify for the international terminology of “ideal” by the same date.

Standards

This involved a clinic or facility passing a test based on a regimen of some 180 standards, from infection control to waiting room facilities.   He was candid enough to say that a major issue was now to control a leaning by both municipalities and local government to build new infrastructure to meet patient demand and NDP targets, rather than maintain and improve existing services which had exactly the same result.

He also wanted to see standards developed countrywide on building costs per square metre since, he complained, a building going up in one province can vary by 100% from another province.   He said DoH had little power to influence the activities of health MECs and wanted to see a list created of “non negotiable items” so that some DoH control could be exercised over municipal budgets and spend.

Overview

His discussion with parliamentarians and his briefing for new MPs roamed over a wide range of health subjects, from female contraception and cancer screening to child health and on the issue of HIV/AIDS, he focused on the need to encourage breast feeding at the expense of formula feeding.    He complained that breast feeding was as low as 8% nationally and wanted to see more, even amongst HIV positive mothers.  He gave outcome figures to support his view.

Dr Motsoaledi spent some time detailing the moves by DoH to introduce more emphasis on preventative health care and education by going to the root of the problem rather than chasing curative health targets, stating that education towards better diets had to become a part of an SA way of life.

He said that for each person who died in South Africa, eight were in hospital and that preventive health care education starting nationally at school age was the only way in his view to reduce poor health in a substantial manner.    A post of an advisor to the deputy minister of health was to be established on this subject and a White Paper on affordable heath care produced.

HIV/AIDS

red_aids_ribbon_hi-resOn the subject of HIV/AIDS, he repeated the statement which he said he had made on a number of occasions to the effect that children born to HIV positive mothers should, by law, be tested for mother-to-child transfer of the disease.   This should happen if child mortality in South Africa was to be tackled successfully, he added.   He did not discuss the constitutional issues involved.

He said the total number of people remaining on ARVs was targeted by DoH at 5.1m for the end of 2018/9, the current figure for 2014/5 being 3m. He added that some 2.4m were currently on the regimen.    DoH targets for HIV tests among the population aged between 15-19 years are targeted at 10m annually, he advised.

TB

On TB control programmes, Dr Motsoaledi said a 79% treatment would be reached for 2014/5 and this was to be targeted at 85% by 2018/9.   The TB defaulter rate was 6% presently and this was to be reduced to 5% over the same period.    He advised that there were over 400,000 TB cases recorded in correctional service facilities and a focus was now to give inmates the correct kind of increased TB and HIV diagnosis and better treatment services.

He emphasised that DoH had to ensure regular TB prevention, screening and treatment carried out by mines by enforcement of compliance regulations for approximately 600,000 miners and employees of associated industries.    He said that DoH was to “heighten” diagnosis and treatment of TB in peri-mining communities “in six districts with a high concentration of mines using DoH TB and HIV mobile units”.

Dr Motsoaledi continued that life expectancy of South Africans had to be raised by 2030 to 70 years, at present being dragged down by HIV/AIDS and TB into the ‘fifties, after having reached 60% at one point recently.

In general, however, there were more people living as well as more people living longer.   The cure rate in Western Cape and Gauteng had now reached 81% but it was slower in other areas, averaging at 74% for the country.    The national target was an 85% cure rate.

Preventable health care

However, on non-communicable diseases, Dr Motsoaledi said that the rise in hypertension numbers was “explosive” and high blood pressure problems were therefore very much part of the preventative health care plan.    5m people were targeted for counsel and screening for high blood pressure in the next four years and a further 5m for raised glucose levels.

Obesity was also a major problem and this was targeted to be reduced by 55% for women and 21% for men in the next four years. This was currently being started with school programmes. There was also a DoH programme in place reduce injury through, accidents and violence by 50% from the high levels of 2010.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//health/health-dept-winning-on-hiv-aids-therapy-and-tb/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/competition-commission-promises-health-care-inquiry/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/state-acknowledges-responsibility-to-increase-health-staff/

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SA to allow avoidance of medical patents

SA copying Brazil by ignoring patents….

pillsGovernment’s Bill on changes to the Intellectual Property Act, not assented to yet by the President but passed by Parliament, is under major attack by overseas pharmaceutical companies who complain that the proposals to allow SA to bypass patent laws are badly drafted; just simply favour local generic manufacturers who have put no R&D into development and further confuse an already obtuse enforcement system of medical patents in South Africa.

Minister of trade and industry, Rob Davies, who was unusually involved in health matters when he recently made statements to the media, “We are the world capital of HIV/AIDS and we have serious burden of TB linked to that … and we have to have the freedom and ability to use the policy space that’s been made available to us under the world health agreement TRIPS ( Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) and public in the interests of the nations that we should take that option.”

South African generics being scouted

However, in this case, the minister was referring to the new government policy on intellectual property (IP), currently under discussion where the minister is saying his department of trade is dealing with “innovative pharmaceutical companies” involved in the production of cheaper drugs. IP is a DTI matter whether it involves health or not.

Briefing journalists on the response to the original draft policy and now the Bill, which elicited submissions representing more than 300 stakeholders, Davies said his department’s fight was “to strike a balance between the needs of public health and the interests of pharmaceutical companies”.

It came out in the questioning with DTI’s spokesperson, MacDonald Netshitenzhe, that the Doha agreement on TRIPS and public health allows countries to break patents by issuing compulsory licences to local manufacturers of generic medicines. These provisions are intended to be used in a public health emergency, and have been used by countries such as Brazil and Thailand to break patents on HIV medicines.

The doctor weighs in with comment

Dr Aaron Motsoaledi, minister of health, has taken the opportunity to declare that South Africa has indeed such an emergency (how much of it caused by the famed past health minister nicked named “minister beetroot” after she called for all to substitute beetroot and garlic for ARV’s aws not mentioned) but minister of trade and industry Rob Davies has added that there are many other areas in health where the poor are not able to begin to afford the menu of drugs on the market.

Commentators are saying  “emergency in HIV/AIDS” referred to by cabinet ministers was caused by government itself in the years of denial over AIDS and quote was activist Zachie Achmat of TAC when  government was refusing to import antiretrovirals (ARVs) some seven years ago, putting South Africa way back in the fight against HIV/AIDS and related diseases such as TB.

Now Zachie Achmat has joined the government call for cheaper drugs and to follow government moves. Other activist groups such as Medicines sans Frontiers have seen the new government policy as an opportunity to push for measures they believe will lower the price of medicines and have said so, particularly influencing Parliament when the matter was in earlier debate there.

An  outcry has grown since the new IP Bill was debated in Parliament, despite the lone voices declaring that the policy that ignoring worldwide patent rights would simply put to risk those investments already made in South Africa by overseas pharmaceuticals.

This charge was led by Wilmot James, shadow minister of trade and industry, and supported, strangely, by ANC Alliance partner, COSATU, for reasons that jobs would be lost.  Wilmot James called the document “remarkably unimpressive”, suggesting “the drafters appear not to fully understand intellectual property law”. Calling the DTI’s document “legally illiterate”, James said that the policy “lives up to the mediocre standard that we have come to accept from the intellectual property division of the department of trade and industry’.

The Doha declaration also allows parallel importation of medicines, which means a company or nongovernmental agency can import a patented drug from another country where the same product is sold at a lower price.

Davies has been quoted by the media as saying “Although we’ve been a major champion of all these processes internationally we haven’t necessarily incorporated them into domestic law. That’s one of the issues that we need to follow through.”

Copyright legislation needed to be brought in line with recent World Intellectual Property Organisation treaties, including the Beijing treaty and the Marrakesh treaty, he said. He was quoted as saying that government was looking at the issue of collective management of royalties in view of complaints from industry stakeholders.

All of this comes in the light of a government health policy to introduce a free national health scheme.  Netshitenzhe of DTI explained that after the public comment period was concluded, the amended document, including comments, will be brought to Cabinet, who may suggest further changes before giving its approval.

Once the policy is finalised, the department of trade and industry will draft legislative amendments to be vetted by Cabinet and Parliament, ideally in March of next year 2014.     Most of the public debate took place in the media whilst Parliament was closed.

Internationals are “satanic” says Motsoaledi

Dr Aaron Motsoaledi weighed in further with the comments to Mail and Guardian, stating “I am not using strong words; I am using appropriate words. This is a conspiracy of “satanic magnitude”, calling on all South Africans to fight “to the last drop of their blood”. Most feel that Motsoaledi will stay as minister of health when the new government is formed in April/May next year.

When the final document re-appears in the public arena in the form of the amended Act in what has become a very heated debate, some watering down may have taken place but what was at first taken to be a simple document protecting indigenous medical practices, has obviously international implications for both local and international partners in the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and those with head offices outside the country.
Previous articles on this subject

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//finance-economic/intellectual-property-laws-amendment-act-law/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//finance-economic/promotion-and-protection-of-investment-bill-opens-major-row/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//health/medical-food-intellectual-property-tackled/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/next-for-pppfa-preferential-procurement-are-pharmaceuticals/

 

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Health dept winning on HIV/AIDS therapy and TB

At last getting there on HIV/AIDS…

red_aids_ribbon_hi-resOn the subject of the department of health (DOH) budget vote, minister of health, Dr Aaron Motsoaledi, indicated to the parliamentary portfolio committee that DOH were getting on top of South Africa’s HIV/AIDS problem and he praised the doctors and nursing staff in government service for making this possible.

He said that South Africa faced the problems of increased life expectancy coupled with extra burden of having to reduce maternal and child mortality; reduce the burden of disease from HIV/AIDS and TB and, critically, improve the effectiveness of the health system.

HIV positive persons on therapy increases

aaron motsolaediHe told parliamentarians that under a programme called NIMART, or Nurse Initiated Management of Antiretroviral Therapy, that health facilities providing antiretrovirals (ARVs) to HIV positive persons had increased from only 490 in February 2010 to 3,540.  In the same vein, the number of nurses trained and certified to initiate ARV treatment in the absence of a doctor were increased from 250 in February 2010 to 23 000.

Under NIMART, the number of people on treatment went from 923 000 in February 2010 to 1,9 million to date – which meant a doubling the number on treatment. “This does not mean that any other epidemics in South Africa are less important, it simply emphasises that the central driver of morbidity and mortality in South Africa is largely HIV and AIDS and TB”, he said.

Groundbreaking single dose pill

Minister Motsoaledi also pointed out that DoH had recently introduced the “ground breaking” single dose combination or FDC pillstherapy. For this over 7,000 health workers had to be trained but the windfall was that whereas it used to cost DoH R314.00 per patient per month to provide ARVs that now, with the single dose treatment, the cost is R89,00 per patient. “This means we can treat many more with the same money that needed to treat one person in 2009”, he said.

“I wish to take this opportunity to thank all the health workers for this sterling performance – especially the nurses without whom this numbers would have been impossible to achieve. The results we achieved from these endeavours are very sweet indeed.”

TB still the big enemy

tbHe went on to tell parliamentarians that some four weeks ago, the Statistician-General had released StatsSA’s yearly figures on the causes of death from disease in South Africa. “They could only release at that stage the 2010 figures, but TB was found to be the number-one killer in the country – not surprising given the synergistic relationship between TB and HIV/AIDS.”

“Into this area of medicine, DOH has recently introduced what is known as GeneXpert technology, the last time any country having any new technology to diagnose TB being over fifty years ago. Before GeneXpert technology, it used to take us a whole week to diagnose TB”.

He said that DoH could now diagnose for TB and get a result in only two hours. This was critical when dealing with patients who have travelled miles or who had no money for transport to return, if they did at all.

Minister Motsoaledi said, “Since its unveiling on 23 March 2013, we have distributed 242 GeneXpert units around the country. This number constitutes 80% of all facilities we would like to cover.”

Worldwide help

aids sickHe said, “ We had spent R117 million shared by the National Department of Health, the Global Fund and the Center for Disease Control in the USA, to achieve this 80% coverage. We have conducted 1,3 million tests using this technology since 2011 and this constitutes more than 50% of the total tests conducted in the whole world.”

He continued, “In five months’ time, we will achieve 100% coverage of all the district hospitals with this system and then we shall move to the big community health centres.”

“ The biggest of these machines, that can diagnose forty-eight patients at a time and I am pleased to say that two have placed, one at Ethekwini Municipality and the second in the Cape Metro at Greenpoint, both areas being the epicentres of TB at the moment.”

The following articles are archived on this subject:
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//health/new-medicine-pricing-structures-out-for-comment/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/state-acknowledges-responsibility-to-increase-health-staff/

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HIV/AIDS gets the attention of SA Parliament

Parliamentary oversight into the fight against HIV/AIDS…………….

Parliament has issued a statement  that it has formed a joint committee on HIV and Aids to specifically focus on the pandemic, a “joint committee” being the coming together of members of both the National Council of Provinces and the National Assembly.

The statement issued said that the move “was born out of a decision by the sub-committee on the Review of Joint Rules and was an attempt to prevent the pandemic from spreading.”

The committee, said the statement, would act as an advisory, influential and consultative body and would monitor and evaluate the implementation of government’s strategy, policy and programmes on HIV and Aids.

Its activities will include introducing an HIV and Aids-related focus in parliamentary activities — including programming of debates, monitoring parliamentary oversight and ensuring that HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment are priorities on the national agenda.

The committee will also examine and evaluate the legal framework and make recommendations on existing and proposed legislation coming from the department of health.

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