Tag Archive | energy mix

Gas undoubtedly on energy back burner

Energy mix on gas unresolved…..

LP gasNot one word on gas and gas exploration, gas pipelines or gas as a contributor to the integrated resources plan has passed through Parliament in nearly one year. The last word was in respect of gas, whether oceanic or land-based, was the knowledge that fracking regulations had been published, the dropping of the oil price seeming to cool off any comment and certainly statements by international investors and companies.
President Zuma has, however made passing reference to Operation Phakisa, the plan to develop South Africa’s oceanic resources but most parliamentary reference to this programme has been in reference to the recent press releases by government in the form of a long term wish to build up South Africa’s maritime ability; create an international ship register and regulate for a merchant shipping fleet.
Going back a bit
In a parliamentary question in the National Assembly last year, Mr. S J NJIKELANAa, previously chairperson of the Energy Portfolio Committee, asked for a written reply by the then Minister of Energy on how far gas exploration had progressed and what urgent state intervention was planned, particularly as far as containment of fuel prices was concerned.
The reply came from the Department of Energy (DOE) in a reply that was somewhat evasive in that it summed what everybody knows; that the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP); the Integrated Energy Plan (IEP;) and the Gas Utilisation Master Plan (GUMP) are amongst the measures which were developed to improve South Africa’s multi-source security of energy supply.
The reply at the time gave responses on the then stage of renewable energy aggregating to cumulative contribution of 17800 MW to the IRP’s final estimate of energy from all sources of 40 000 Megawatts (MW). All of this really helped nobody.

Sourcing of energy
The second contributor to the formula was nuclear power contributing a much quoted 9600MW (and now expected to be more) and hydropower at 2600 MW, with“75% of new generation capacity being derived from energy sources other than coal”, it was stated.

 DOE finally got round to GUMP, describing it as “the development of a gas pipeline infrastructure for South Africa’s needs and to connect South Africa with African countries endowed with vast natural gas resources” but at the time DOE was still recovering from the shock of splitting up from environmental affairs and could not separate gas exploration from mining exploration, in that the Department of Mineral Resources was deeply involved. A total figure for gas has not been formulated.

Another problem for DOE.

In reality, the Petroleum Agency of South Africa (PASA) is technically responsible for GUMP although gas exploration seaDOE’s hydrocarbons division seemed to have been lumped with the problem of what has been described by most authorities and energy specialists as an “exciting hope” for solving SA’s energy problems.
In the meanwhile, it has become the poor child of the energy mix, Minister Joemat-Pettersson recently explaining last week DOE’s poor performance and lack of response on the gas issue as being due to short staffing and “too many issues” on hand.

Last definition

GUMP in fact, (when Parliament was last told} would take a 30-year view of the gas industry from regulatory, economic and social perspectives and this was in the final stage of internal approval and was expected to be released for public comment during the second quarter of the 2015 financial year.
The request for IP proposals for gas-fired generation through a gas-to-power procurement programme for a combined 3 126 MW allocation was expected to be released to the market in September this year, with a bid submission phase planned for the first quarter of 2016.

It seems that South Africa’s DOE can only handle one problem at a time. First it was Eskom and electricity and then the nuclear tendering process, which is in fact a very long term solution to South Africa’s energy problem, as put by one member.

Behind closed doors

Gas exploration, as a subject in itself, benefited from a final decision (which in fact is still mostly rumour in Parliament and unreported) that the Minister Rob Davies’s solution not to acquire 20% -25% “free carry” in gas exploration “finds” seems to be the last definitive action to be taken by government on the whole question of gas exploitation and development.

Meanwhile, Minister Joemat-Pettersson, Minister of Energy, was quoted in the media (and we quote tina-joemattEngineering News specifically) as saying that nuclear power was staying at 9600MW and hydropower at 2600 MW.
The Minister added, “We have paid little attention to gas . . . We have been preoccupied with nuclear [energy].  The South Africa we [are] dealing with now is not the same [as the one we dealt with] in 2013 [when many energy-generation plans were put into play]; the scenarios have changed,” she said to the Creamer organisation.

Not on the agenda

In the remaining few weeks of the third parliamentary calendar sessions, no meetings of the parliamentary committee on energy are scheduled for this vital component of the energy mix, although the anti-fracking lobby was particularly evident at a recent energy committee meeting on the five nuclear vendor agreements.

karoo2They were particularly agitated to hear that the South Korean nuclear vendor offers included development of uranium deposits as part of their deal, such deposits known to be in the Karoo. The only movement recently therefore on gas development would seem to be in the area of Sasol development in infrastructure development locally, presumably in pipelines, and a rather “cool” statement from Shell Oil on fracking possibilities in the Karoo related the world price of oil.
The shortage of liquid petroleum gas (LPG) to meet market demand appears to be the only gas issue to coming before Parliament in the near future.
Other articles in this category or as background
Fracking, shale gas gets nearer – ParlyReportSA
Competition Commission turns to LP gas market – ParlyReportSA
Gas Utilisation Master Plan gets things going – ParlyReportSA
Oil sea gas/debate restarted by Parliament
Uncertainty in oil and gas exploration industry

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Grand Inga hydro power possible

DRC clean energy destined for SA….

drc flagOpposition members of the parliamentary energy committee expressed a certain level of cynicism regarding the Grand Inga project treaty signed recently between South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the subject of which is a multi-phased hydro power station to be built on the Congo River.

They noted that the DRC is ranked second only to Somalia as the worst country on a worldwide index of failed states    However, despite this reservation, MPs in general noted that on the whole the project had “exciting possibilities”, albeit long term ones.

These points were made during a presentation by the department of energy (DoE) on the Inga treaty recently signed by President Zuma.   Inga 1 and Inga 2 dams are already in operation, supplying low output power. The issue of a hydro power link with the DRC has been “on the table” for some fifteen years.

Congo River cusec power

The new third Inga dam, which will be by far the largest and hence the title “grand” for the whole project. The project will be approximately 250 kms from the capital Kinshasa and 50kms from Africa’s West coast, the Congo River having the second largest and strongest flow after the Amazon, mainly as a result of the dams being sited after one of the largest waterfalls in the world. However, the Congo has by no means the longest and largest drainage area.

DoE said in response to the statement that the DRC was a failed state that whilst it recognised that the DRC had been unstable for years, especially in the North Eastern Region, most of the trouble was more than 200km from the Inga site and even when the civil war at its height, there had never been any interruption of power services.

The Grand Inga project, said DOE in quoting the developers, would be able to supply some 40,000MW in clean energy when all seven phases were completed for development in Central, East and Southern Africa.

SA power line to local grid

It is foreseen that new transmission line to South Africa necessary will be associated with the first phase of the project and which would probably traverse Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana.   It is estimated that the first phase will cost some R140bn at current prices.

The meeting in question was attended by the deputy minister of energy, Thembisile Majola, and DoE represented by Ompi Aphane, DDG: policy, planning and clean energy, DoE, who indicated that the treaty provided for the establishment of an Inga Development Authority (ADEPI). There would also be a joint ministerial committee drawn from the two signatory countries and a joint and permanent technical committee to facilitate the project.

Earlier failures

The deputy minister said that the new treaty had at last put behind the failed Westcor project, involving Billiton and essentially a SADC body involving SA, Angola, Botswana, the Congo and Namibia with the DRC as lead.

In 2010, the DRC announced it was pulling out of the arrangement and would develop the Inga dam complex on its own, which move collapsed the Westcor consortium. However, despite much wasted time and effort, Aphane said a good deal of the feasibility work had been completed.

Minister Majola said that what had been learnt from Westcor was that any future proposition had to be on a win/win basis for each participant in order to avoid such a collapse.    It was now recognised that the DRC had to meet its own requirements first as a basis for any project to succeed as a consortium, the minister added.

Getting in first

An MOU with the DRC was subsequently signed on this basis in 2011 and the current treaty provides not only a potential to generate the stated 40 000 MW after its seven phases but to provide relatively cheap, clean energy at any point, of which RSA has secured rights to import 12 000MW.

Ompi Aphane explained that in return DRC have agreed to grant SA the right of first refusal (ROFR) for both equity and off-take in respect of any and all future phases of the project or any related hydro-electric development of the Congo River in and around the Inga complex.

Once RSA is “locked in” to phase one and proceeds with implementation, it is committed to take 2500 MW as an off take.

SA gets lowest terms

US$ 10m is payable by SA in terms of the treaty into an escrow account as commitment fee in terms of the ROFR.    Aphane said that SA will be charged the lowest possible tariff and no other off-taker will be able to receive better terms than SA.

He continued, “DRC are to ensure that for each phase of the project, the developer company will reserve at least 15 per cent of the available equity to SA and South African entities, public or private, and SA shall be the first to be offered such share capital.”

Aphane said the “designated delivery point” will be at Kolwezi, about 150 km from the DRC/Zambia border and SA will be responsible for the 150 km line needed.   The DRC will either provide a concession to enable SA to construct and operate that portion of the line to the Zambian border, or commit to develop it themselves.   One of the DRC’s most obvious priorities was the supply of power to Kinshasa and Zambia’s “copperbelt”.

Parliament to approve

DoE concluded their presentation by telling MPs that the treaty would be introduced to Parliament for ratification in due course and negotiations on the outstanding protocols on tariff setting also needed to be finalised.    On a critical path plan were also negotiations with transit countries and a final feasibility study on the direction that the transmission line would take.

Ompi Aphane, in responding to a number of MPs questions, said that on environmental issues, which were in article 14 of the treaty, carbon credit matters has been taken into consideration and more would be heard on this.

SA not involved in dam

On the critical issue of finance, Ompi Aphane said that MPs should realize that other than the possibility of transmission lines, SA was not involved in dam construction and the country would be paying for power on connection, plus in all probability building a transmission line to connect to the SA grid.   Consequently there were no major debt issues arising at present.

Ntsiki Mashimbye, SA’s ambassador to the DRC, was present at the meeting and commented that the Grand Inga project “was not a project in isolation, not even just about electricity, but about industrializing Africa as a whole.”

The minister concluded by commenting that the integration of the African continent was the target as well as providing clean energy sustainability for South Africa and all the benefits that would ensue, including resale to other nations.
Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/grand-inga-hydroelectric-power-getting-under-way-at-last/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/integrated-energy-plan-iep-around-corner/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/doe-talks-biofuels-and-biomass/

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Gas Utilisation Master Plan gets things going

Gas a “game changer” in energy mix…

gas pipelineWith the publication for comment of the Gas Utilisation Master Plan (Gump) by the department of energy (DoE), South Africa came a step further towards the finalisation of its Integrated Energy Plan (IEP), meaning also that the document has received approval by the cabinet.

The document, based on a Green Paper released by DOE some years ago, provides a framework for investment in gas-supporting infrastructure and outlines the role that gas could conceivably play in the electricity, transport, domestic, commercial and industrial sectors.

LNG and gas, offshore -onshore

The Gump outlines, amongst other issues,  the import of liquified natural gas (LNG) and piped gas from Namibia and Mozambique and plans for production of natural and shale gas in South Africa.  A plan to have 67 GW of installed gas generation by 2050 is considered by the paper.
The plan is particularly relevant at the moment with Eskom having to rely, as grid backup during the current winter, on expensive diesel-fueled open-cycle gas turbines. The Gump proposals on electricity generation, talk of conversion to closed-cycle turbine power using gas.

The paper also expands on importing electricity from gas sourced from Mozambique and Namibia with lines to the Eskom system grid including imports from the largest present and mainly undeveloped gas fields in Tanzania neighbouring the northern Mozambique fields.

Learning curve

New minister of energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson, will have deepen her knowledge base very quickly on such matters as the IEP, energy resources and liquid fuels plans, all urgent and with immediacy.   Such issues as the process of energy integration overall and the issue of the stalled independent power producers (IPP) programme in terms of the held-over Independent System Market Operators (ISMO) Bill, are also waiting for position on the energy starting track.

DoE has also pointed to its intended coal gas programme with an IPP programme for the generation of some 6,500MW of power. The department further states that the Gump takes a 30-year view of the industry. It not only deals, they say, with the regulatory environment and economic predictions but does touch on social issues and environmental matters as well.

The master plan also talks of a gas line from Mozambique to Gauteng via Richards Bay and how gas will be distributed and stored, together with the issue of LNG terminal storage.

As a separate issue to Gump but part of the same overall plan, DOE has also released public comment the issue of investment by private merchants in fuel and gas storage, particularly referring to Saldanha Bay.

Storage, a vexed issue

Fuel storage at the present moment is traditionally undertaken by the major oil companies, in some cases integrated with state facilities and who can more easily absorb some of the more riskier aspects of this sector with their vertical interests both upstream and downstream.

DoE sees a greater contribution from investment by private merchants in storage and is currently attempting to re-structure the system to attract and build the industry to counter present storage problems and for early consideration as part of South Africa’s strategic fuels plan and as part of a licensing and regulation background.

In the short term, DoE says in its Gump programme, such a system is needed in terms of LNG holding reserves, imported as LNG or from state owned PetroSA’s gas-to-liquids plant at Mossel Bay, until more natural gas comes down the envisaged pipelines from the current exploration areas.

At the moment Sasol pipes 188-million gigajoules a year of gas into South Africa from Mozambique.  The possibility of LNG re-gasification plants offshore on the West coast in the near future is also debated in the Gump programme released.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/parliament-re-starts-oilsea-gas-debate/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/shale-gas-exploration-gets-underway/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/oil-and-gas-industry-criticizes-minerals-petroleum-bill/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/future-clearer-as-gas-amendment-bill/

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Oil/sea gas debate re-started by Parliament

Parliament calls for public input on gas debate….

Roughnecks wrestle pipe on a True Company oil drilling rig outside WatfordOn the prospects of transforming the gas industry through partnerships, the parliamentary portfolio committee on energy has invited comments.  Recent presentations to the portfolio committee have led to a renewed belief that gas, whether found and transformed, offshore or onshore, needs more focus.

The background to the invitation for comment, which will have no doubt come from chair Sisi Njikelana, says, “Current development of regional gas-fields will lead to natural gas becoming a more important fuel source in South Africa. With the availability of natural gas in neighbouring countries, such as Mozambique, Namibia and Tanzania, and the additional discovery of offshore gas reserves in South Africa, the gas industry in South Africa is poised to undergo expansion.”

The notice continues, “ Natural and coal gas play separate roles in the energy system, with natural gas being used solely as a feedstock for the production of synthetic fuels, and coal gas as an industrial and domestic fuel.”

“The gas industry in South Africa is regulated by the Gas Act 48 of 2001, which is currently being revised. As part of the build up to discussing amendments to this Act, Parliament wishes to engage the public on the topic of “Prospects of transforming the gas industry through partnerships”.

“Sub topics (as part of the main theme) can include (but not limited to) finance, pricing, infrastructure development, procurement, technology research and development, key success factors, skills development and transfer, community involvement and expansion of the gas industry in South Africa.”

Public hearings are scheduled for 30 January 2014. Interested individuals, organisations and institutions wishing to comment were requested in the notice to forward written submissions to the Portfolio Committee have been asked to declare an interest in making an oral presentation to the portfolio committee itself if they so wish.

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Nuclear and gas workshop meeting

Gas emerges as winner……

nuclear logoIn what appeared to be a listening platform for anti-nuclear lobbyists, an energy stakeholders meeting, organised by the portfolio committee on energy on nuclear energy with the subject of nuclear energy as a component of South Africa’s future energy mix, was billed as a debate as such.  However it turned out to be a platform for speakers and not a debate at all.

This was primarily because there were so many submissions and questions had to be cut down to one minute, most of the earlier time having been taken by the department of energy, NECSA and proponents of the nuclear build programme using the day for presentations, already seen in Parliament and by parliamentarians.

Nuclear platform not provided

Opposition members expressed their anger at their inability to listen to any serious opposition to the use or deployment of nuclear facilities but a number of interesting points did emerge that may give value to whether or not it was worth having had a meeting at all.

Much of what emerged was the seriousness of the costs of any nuclear programme; safety matters and job creation ability, particularly in the relationship between nuclear versus solar and wind and other clean energy projects.

Govt. seems fixed on nuclear

Whilst the chair, Sisa Njikelana, said the meeting was not about trying to change government plans on its nuclear ambitions which clearly included nuclear energy in its planning, or debate the extent to which whether or not nuclear will or will not be part of the energy mix, he nullified arguments put forward by stating that a revised integrated resources plan was to be available in the coming weeks.

Most presenters expressed surprise that government policy was so fixed on the matter.

What did emerge that detractors were quoting the high costs of Finnish nuclear re-actors but the subject of low-cost Chinese or Korean re-actors did not emerge, as stated by one commentator.

Plans for waste in hand

Furthermore, DEO negated all complainants on the issue of nuclear waste by saying that plans were in process to handle long term nuclear waste with a scientific solution by government and the main problem was a misinformed public at this stage.

DEO also responded that hydro power could be a lot more dangerous and threatening to a massive number of communities downstream than any nuclear re-actor and that nobody had died in the Fukushima accident, which was the result of an earthquake not nuclear mishandling.

From results tabled it appeared that wind power was more expensive on a consumer cost basis.

Shell says gas cost effective

A major input came from Shell SA who pointed out that whilst they were not against building nuclear plants but for cost of building one nuclear plant, three national gas pipelines could be built, enough to handle all South Africa’s gas field requirements and include also the cost of gas to fuel technology.

The result of the stakeholders meeting in fact resulted in a determination of parliamentarians to insist upon DEO that gas should be focussed upon to a far greater extent when determining South Africa’s future energy mix and needs.

Refer to articles in this category

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/integrated-energy-plan-iep-around-corner/ http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/nuclear-goes-ahead-maybe-strategic-partner/ http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/national-nuclear-control-centre-now-in-place/

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Nuclear goes ahead: maybe “strategic partner”

Eskom in poll position…

nuclear logoClarification of South Africa’s intentions towards the inclusion of nuclear energy as an integral part of the national energy mix have now been made quite clear, South Africa’s nuclear team possibly working with a “strategic partner” but with Eskom in poll position.

Strong messages that this was the case have been emerging from parliamentary presentations by both the department of energy and public enterprises over the last few weeks but now the die is set.

Minister spells it out

It needed the confirmation of the minister of energy, Ms Dipuo Peters, to tie the knot as she did in a media briefing following her budget vote speech in Parliament. She confirmed that the nuclear build programme will add 9 600 megawatts to the national grid by 2023 and a form of consortium would be reached whereby Eskom would have the designation as owner and operator, the national nuclear energy executive (NNEECC) to ensure oversight and be responsible for key decisions.

The final investment decisions towards procurement of plant would now be made, she said, Neliswe Magubane responding to media questions that having Eskom on board might deter potential partners to the effect that this could not be the case. She could not see how suppliers were interested in operating factors, although NNEECC could well draw in a “strategic partner” to bring further expertise to the table.

Eskom looking a massive loans

With Eskom now facing capital expansion projects separately detailed by them in the recent NEMA-Air Quality emissions hearings and also as a result of a “New Build” nuclear development programme that involves it seems at least six nuclear plants, NERSA in a separate parliamentary meeting in recent days, admitted that it was difficult to see how eventually all of this could fail to translate down into yet further electricity price hikes.

Air quality a deciding factor

Both minister Gigaba of public enterprises and minister Peters of energy have both brought the added fact of reduced emissions of CO2 as a major factor in the decision making in what appears to be a co-ordinated approach. The main issue remaining is therefore the time delay in bringing the nuclear contribution online to the grid.

From questioning it became evident that Eskom may have to reconsider bringing forward one its coal fired plants as far as completion dates are concerned.
The following articles are archived on this subject:

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/energy-resources-doing-it-better-and-quickly/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/energy-plan-assumptions-on-nuclear-build-out-in-new-year/

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Davies presses the button on nuclear development

Dr Rob Davies, minister of trade and industry, in a statement issued to the media following up on address given by him at the Nuclear Empowerment Conference in Johannesburg recently, stated that South Africa’s entry into the nuclear energy field was “expected to be one of the largest state-owned procurements in the country”.

Davies pointed to the fact that such a massive investment in new technologies could place the country ahead in manufacturing.    The step was “a major opportunity for the South African local supply and manufacturing industry to develop”.

The conference was dealing with South Africa’s energy mix particularly related to nuclear development.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Energy, Fuel,oil,renewables, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments


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