Tag Archive | CEF

Parliament set for tough questioning

Editorial…

…..Busy session to get some answers

….  In the absence of any move by the National Prosecuting Authority, particularly the somnambulant National Director of Public Prosecutions Shaun Abrahams whose department seems confused as to whether 100,000 leaked Gupta e-mails constitute prima facie evidence of fraud or not, it falls to a parliamentary committee in Cape Town once again to be the first official venue for any debate of consequence on the State/Gupta corruption scandals.

In one of the first meetings of the recently re-opened Parliament, the Public Enterprises Portfolio Committee is to receive a report back from legal experts on the setting up of the Eskom enquiry.

Party vs the Church

Oddly enough, it was in also Cape Town, at St George’s Cathedral, in early June, where the fight first began.    Later, the venue was room 249 in the National Assembly, where the Public Enterprises Portfolio Committee was addressed by Bishop of the South African Council of Churches (SACC). He had then just released a report on corruption by the SACC Unburdening Panel.

It fell to the Bishop the first shot and there was a sobering moment of silence in parliamentary room 249 when he finished talking. It felt like a small moment in South African history.  What came after that seemed like a little bit of a parliamentary let-down in the following weeks but it is important that what the Bishop had to say is further reported for the record.

Take that

Bishop Mpumlwana reminded all present, and particularly parliamentarians who claimed that the Church should not be “fiddling in politics”, that the same politicians had repeated the phrase, “So help me God” when taking office.

He said that the Church had no intention of ignoring the evil that was being perpetrated on the people of South Africa and asked all to note that the Constitution ended, “May God bless South Africa.”

He also said that systematic looting of resources had created a crisis for South Africans, particularly the poor. He called upon all parliamentarians to look to their consciences and assist with “the righteous cause of tracking down all those involved” in what was now an obvious state capture plan hatched during President Zuma’s watch in which the President himself, he said, was involved.

Cry, the beloved country

In a particularly moving address, he reminded all that SACC had come out in vocal support of the ANC during the apartheid years when President PW Botha was in power.   Now was the time to speak up again on the unbridled abuse of power by an ANC Cabinet and a President “who had lost his way on moral issues.”

The Church, he said, must intervene and as a result of the SACC “unburdening” process which had been conducted some months ago, he now knew that “mafia-style control” was being exercised by a political elite in Eskom, Transnet, Denel, and other government agencies.

Ignored

An attempt was in process to gain control over public funds destined particularly regarding rail, arms and nuclear projects, the last being a totally unnecessary burden placed upon the country, he said.    He concluded with an appeal to parliamentarians present to expose the crimes committed and “restore the dream that had built a rainbow nation admired the world over.”

It was gratifying to hear in following days that the Public Enterprises committee, under chairperson Zukiswa Rantho, had instituted an enquiry into Eskom’s accounts (and also Transnet and Denel it turned out) with legal opinion to be discussed in the in the next session of Parliament.

That time has now arrived and one hopes that a lot of explanations will emerge and a lot more untruths discovered in meetings with the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) and its apparently confused but certainly compromised leader responsible, Minister, Lynne Brown.

Looking ahead

Parliament has now a busy schedule in August to catch up on lost time with delays incurred by staging a “secret ballot” on the no-confidence in President Zuma vote.

One issue will involve the passage of the contentious Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, scheduled for a meeting with the Select Committee again towards the end of August; the Expropriation Bill; and the implementation of all Twin Peaks regulations – including those for the Financial Intelligence Centre to operate in terms of the “money-laundering” changes.

This last-named body is quoted as having handed over some 7,000 cases of suspicious money movements to SAPS/Hawks and Themba Godi, chair of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts (SCOPA), has made the public comment that any parliamentary finance joint meetings must see such matters on oversight resolved in the short term, preferably immediately.

Energy up and down

Minister of Energy, Mmamaloko Kubayi, was to be informing her Portfolio Committee on the can of worms opened with her suspension of the board the Central Energy Fund stated by her as being in connection with the suspicious sale of South Africa’s oil reserves held by the Strategic Fuel Fund.

Past Minister of Energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson, seems to have possibly lied earlier to Parliament over the sale of these assets and she, in her subsequent silence, appears to be joining what is now a whole roomful of past ministers and director generals involved in the tangled web of deceit and manipulation at the edge of business and commerce  – some of it linked to Gupta e-mails, some just motivated by plain criminal greed.

But all Energy Portfolio Committee meetings on any subject have now been abruptly halted in the light of matters involving the possible suspension of the DG of Energy Policy and Planning, Omhi Aphane, (a long-time and experienced government staffer) on on an issue regarding of nuclear consultancy fees, according to the media.   It would appear a whistle blower is at work in DoE.

Minister Kubayi is certainly causing waves and many hope that the responsibility for Eskom is to be handed over to this Minister from the DPE, back to where it was originally rooted with all other energy resources.

Untouched as usual

The issue of debt relief legislation under the aegis of Chair Joan Fubbs of the Trade and Industry Committee will be important as will meetings on energy involving electricity, IPPs, nuclear and clearing up the PetroSA mess.   But first, this committee should sort out what is to be done with a draft Copyright Bill amending and updating anchor legislation, laws that have not been touched since 1976.

What DTI have so far come up with has legal experts in complete confusion since there appears no understanding by DTI in their draft of the difference between paintings, works of art and the high-tec world of data authorship which underwrites commerce and industry and on which depends a massive IT industry both here and mostly abroad.   Fortunately, with a person like Joan Fubbs in charge, basic misunderstandings such as this will get sorted out.  However, that such unintended consequences might have occurred worries many.

The various Finance Committees will meet for joint sessions for a number of tax and money Bills and amendment proposals and Posts and Telecommunications will hear its Department’s comments on public hearings, all regarding the ICT White Paper Policy.

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Parliament awaits to hear from Cabinet

Same Parliament, same Cabinet, different mood

..editorial……Parliament has now resumed with the same Cabinet, the same 400 MPs, the same ANC Allianceparliament 6 majority instructed whips and the same names in the party benches but the ambiance is very different.     This subtle fact, however, matters little in the immediate future.   Legislation before the National Assembly (NA) will still be subject to a simple numbers game when it comes to voting. Well, almost.

In the case of a Section 76 Bill, that is a Bill that needs not merely the concurrence of that portion of the 400 MPs that sit in the NCOP but subject to full debate by all nine provinces and a mandate returned in favour or not, there might be the beginnings of healthier opposition. Power at local level has been emboldened since Parliament last met.

So far, matters of consequence have been that the Department of Energy has presented its REIPPP plan with support from most other than Eskom with no Minister present and the Mineral Resources Portfolio Committee has re-endorsed a revised Minerals and Petroleum  Resources Development Amendment Bill for process by the NCOP using its ANC majority. Again no Minister was present. Eskom will be presenting on this and matters regarding coal any day.

Old tricks

jacob zumaHowever, presuming the picture in Parliament stays as it is until the 2019 national election with Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma at the helm as President, it will be interesting to see what type and how much legislation is hammered through the NA by the ANC using the same old tactic of deploying party whips with threats of being moved down on the party list system for a total majority, timed last year in a rush just before a recess.

Notably, now in the case of three Bills sent for assent after being voted through, the three were not signed by President Zuma into law acting on legal advice.

With this trio now back with Parliament on the grounds of either suspected unconstitutionality and/or incorrect parliamentary procedure, the issue is now whether the coterie of Cabinet Ministers that surround the President, with Director Generals appointed by and who report to those Ministers, will take Parliament more seriously.

Not hearing

Good advice is not good advice when it comes in the form of a last minute warning not to put signature to any Bill thereby turning it into an Act of law. Plenty of such advice not do this in respect of a number of Bills was previously given during parliamentary portfolio committee debate, at parliamentary public hearings from affected institutions, business and industry and even earlier in public comment when the Bills were first published by gazette in draft form.

Similarly, the lesson seems not to be learnt in higher echelons that the independent regulatory entities are also not to be ignored – institutions from the Office of the Public Prosecutor to ICASA, from NERSA through to the board of the Central Energy Fund and from National Treasury to international courts, the UN and international bodies protecting human rights. Parliament is due to hear from ICASA any moment.

Most worrying, however, are the attempts to by-pass Treasury when presenting policy to Parliament. Ideological bullying can bankrupt a country in no time.

Such issues as Minister Aaron Motsoaledi’s National Health Insurance dream and Minister Joemat-Pettersson/President Jacob’s Zuma’s dream of six nuclear energy reactors – plans that the country should not possibly not countenance from a financial aspect – have neither been presented to Parliament in the proper national budget planning form or officially and financially endorsed.

Missing money details

Minister of Health, Aaron Motsoaledi, has gone as far as a White Paper to Parliament on the NHI and Minister Joemat-Pettersson has briefed Parliament on nuclear tendering. Treasury have said nothing about a financial plan in each case. Money is short, as evidenced by Treasury stepping in on the provisions for BEE preferential procurement. Somewhere there is a disconnect.

As for President Zuma’s continued pressure to bring traditional leaders into the equation with what amounts to two separate judicial systems and has even talked of the equivalent of four tiers of government – one therefore not even reporting to Parliament and certainly no idea of local government and nor subject to the PMFA  has its problems. President Zuma has used his ally, the Minister of Justice, to table the Traditional Courts Bill before Parliament. Opposition parties will walk out on that one, we are sure.

The Speaker of the House, Baleka Mbete, as part of the same coterie, has made a mild signal that the days of Cabinet maverick behaviour, even arrogance, towards Parliament and no respect for the separation of powers may be coming to an end. The SACP is clearly not happy. That is where the new ambiance felt in an unchanged Parliament may play an unofficial part and pressure may start building.

 
Previous articles on category subject
Parliament to open Aug 16 – ParlyReportSA
Parliament under siege – ParlyReportSA
Radical White Paper on NHI published – ParlyReportSA
Zuma’s nuclear energy call awaits Treasury – ParlyReportSA
Here it comes again…. the Traditional Courts Bill – ParlyReportSA

Posted in cabinet, earlier editorials, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Justice, constitutional, Trade & Industry0 Comments

The big SA cabinet crunch

Editorial….

Cabinet hopes are Brown, Ramaphosa, Gordhan…..

Public Enterprises Minister, Lynne Brown, reports that she is to introduce as a cabinet draft, the Lynne BrownShareholder Management Bill as part of a plan to introduce leadership ability and some form of continuity for the state owned enterprises (SOCs) under her control.   This includes Eskom, Transnet, Denel, SA Express, Alexkor and Safcol.

We hope this is the start of something big.

The last few weeks have been an exercise in disaster, so let’s try and take a positive spin on things from a parliamentary viewpoint. Whilst troubled SAA is now an independent, falling under National Treasury and if President Zuma minds his own business, Minister Pravin Gordhan is to sort out National Treasury itself and also the troubled SARS, which he re-designed in the first place and which became such a success working with Trevor Manuel.

More problem children

Meanwhile, PetroSA is in real deep water falling, the entity falling under Central Energy Fund (CEF) reporting to Department and Energy (DOE). With Minister Joemat-Pettersson not back from COP21 or wherever, the country still faces some serious energy issues. But at least the PetroSA problem is now all in the open, with somebody obviously having to take over the reins and the mess, probably CEF itself.
Oddly enough there are people in CEF who know exactly what the problem is but once again politicians pushed experts in the wrong direction, it appears.

In addition, the Passenger Rail Association (PRASA) is very much on the slippery slope and, together with SANRAL, both present highly contentious transport issues which are now in the hands of Minister Cyril Ramaphosa to untangle. Troubling times indeed.

Public Enterprises comes to the party

lyne brown 2Now Minister Lynne Brown appears to be getting the senior management of her portfolio under control and whilst we could still have shutdowns at Eskom she says, because “machines can break down unexpectedly”, the leadership is there she says, as is the case with her Denel.
Lynne Brown recently reported that there are around 700 SOCs, an extraordinary fact, but bearing in mind the fact that South Africa is reputed to have the largest head count in public service per population count, this would appear quite possible.

On the road again

With Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa chairing an Integrated Marketing Committee, which will hopefullyramaphosa designate which entities should remain SOCs and those which should be absorbed back into their relevant departments, there appears some hope with regard to containing the ballooning public service machine which has characterised President Zuma’s presidency.

Hands off appointments

An essential element of Minister Lynne Brown’s plan is to remove the appointment to the boards of the entities under her domain away from cabinet and Ministers, including herself, to a shareholder management team that creates a leadership operational plan for all SOCs and appoints, through due process, a tightly run appointment book.

A brave proposition indeed but it does indicate that Minister Brown is her own person.

Whilst the proposals might look like state control, in fact it is a clear signal that government may have heard the message that the current system of Ministers appointing board members is not working, is open to abuse and what is worse, the consequent “jobs for the boys” system results in taxpayer’s money being thrown away through bad management, corruption and what the auditor general calls “useless and wasteful expenditure”.

On the drawing board

The Shareholder Management Bill, Minister Brown said in Johannesburg, will first need a concept paper (perhaps she means a White Paper) and such could be released after the February Cabinet Lekgotla in February, with an intention of introducing such as system by the end of 2016.

Whilst it is pretty obvious who should not be on such an appointment team, the plan begs the question of will be chosen to occupy such critical posts but it is far too early to cogitate on this one. With Ministers changing their portfolios as if it was a game of musical chairs, there is reason to congratulate Minister Brown on the statement that she herself as a Minister would be excluded from making appointments in her own SOCs.

Leadership needed

During the same address, she added that Eskom was “not out of the woods” yet and there was still not sufficient electricity to facilitate economic growth, but the leadership issue was being addressed satisfactorily with the right people being appointed. Brown said none of the entities under her control “would be approaching the National Treasury with begging bowls”.

Perhaps this is the principle being adopted behind the scenes with the SABC, which whilst not affecting business and industry other than travel costs, unlike trade and investment hurdles and industrial strategic changes, SABC is threatened by the possibility of being returned to its parent government department which at first glance appeared to be a move by President Zuma to gain control of state financed media, Mugabe style.

However, in a broad sense it seems to be Minister Brown’s idea that appointments to the top echelons running the country should be as a result of finding those qualified to do so rather than being handled by totally unqualified persons, some with solicitous intent, and others trying to retain power with dubious appointments such as having friends, in the case of the SABC, to broadcast “the truth” to specific rural audiences.

Unprincipled governance remains the one of the biggest problems facing South Africa, intrinsically coupled to (and in some cases causing} lack of growth and lack of jobs.

Croneyism

Bad appointments by Ministers and of Ministers has been the cornerstone of control by patronage, the route for corruption and the reason for sheer bad management, a practice now openly exposed but not yet controlled by any means. From a parliamentary viewpoint, let us leave it there. The rest is being said by the media but most MPs when they return to Parliament in late January 2016 will have realized that sheer stupidity can ruin their own futures and their pensions.

But if Minister Lynne Brown, in her practical and down to earth manner, can come up with the remarkable idea of Cabinet Ministers, hopefully including the Presidency as well, not interfering in who does what as far as expertise is concerned, then perhaps this can be applied to all 47 government departments and agencies.

One small step

No doubt as far as confirmation of an appointment, the Minister involved may still have to “approve” such a decision but it is worth watching the outcome of the debate on the shortly-to-be tabled Broadcasting Bill, if only to see if the appointment of inept senior appointments can be halted or reversed.

What has come out of the Eskom, PRASA and PetroSA issues is that a bad leader with no qualification or right to be in a position of leadership, or worse led by one who has supplied fraudulent qualifications, leads to frustration and anger by those with genuine skills and high academic qualifications lower down the ladder at the coalface. This is in the space of government service where technical skills are located and badly needed.

We hope Minister Lynne Brown has more of these “eureka” moments.

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CEF hurt by Mossel Bay losses

CEF R3.4bn write down was “irregular” …..

PetroSA logoLosses incurred at the Central Energy Fund (CEF) gas to liquid facility at Mossel Bay operated by PetroSA have resulted in a revaluation of assets based on the expected life of the refinery but the impairment that resulted, to the tune of R3.4bn, was found to be “irregular” by the office of the auditor general (AG) when reviewing the CEF 2013/4 results.

CEO of CEF, Siswe Mncwango, appeared before the portfolio committee on energy together with the chief executives of subsidiaries PetroSA, iGas, the Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF), African Exploration and Mining (AE) and the licensing and regulatory petroleum body, PASA, to brief the committee on their annual report and to justify their financial performance in terms of the AG findings for the group.

PetroSA struggling

The key issue central to the impairment of R3.4bn, Mncwango said, was the necessity for subsidiary PetroSA, in terms of its mandate, to maintain its levels of gas feedstock at a sufficient level to meet strategic stock policy in the national interest.  It was necessary, he said, to undertake this accounting process in view of delays experienced in exploiting undersea gas fields.

He said, the plant started operating at Mossel Bay in 1992, the life of plant being estimated at 15 years, and then known as Mossgas. With the project not having the necessary funding for exploration at sea during its early years, the plant consequently became threatened far too early in its planned operating life.

Limited choices

CEF faced two financially driven options, Mncwango explained to parliamentarians.  There was a choice between running the plant at 50% capacity or to close it down, he said.  As the strategic need for gas feedstock was an imperative facing both CEF and PetroSA, it was decided to further explore the existing and nearby gas field area.

Project Ikhwezi was thus born but at this stage expensive drilling to greater depths and lateral drives have been encountered and with newly pioneered methods, this has resulted in major additional costs. However, PetroSA, in a briefing from their engineering head on the subject drilling expectations, indicated that they are confident that plentiful gas supplies are on the cards.

Long time drilling

The project involves tapping into gas reserves in Petro SA’s F-O field which is located 40km south-east of the production platform off the south coast of South Africa.  The first well drilled was finalised in 2013 and the final link between all wells is to be completed during 2014/2015, parliamentarians were told.

The delays that have been experienced have also negatively affected the finances of PetroSA, CEF said, and this had necessitated permission for a temporary impairment from national treasury. However, this was not certificated correctly according to the AG’s report and consequently the R3.4bn impairment became “irregular”.

Difficult waters

According to Andrew Dippenaar, PetroSA’s upstream acting vice-president, Project Ikhwezi may, and probably will, be producing in some eighteen months. The riskiness and speed necessary in trying to find gas in difficult waters has added to the problems, he said, on top of which the gas field is geologically problematic.

This has led to operating losses at refinery level with a result that some sort of accounting write off was necessary in the short term, despite this hurting PetroSA’s current cash reserves of R5.5bn. This amount will not be recoverable, CEF’s financial officer said but he was adamant that this was not a cash loss affecting the taxpayer, more a book entry. CEO Mncwango added that inherited delays in finding gas at sea in the immediate area close to the landing facilities had resulted in the current situation. These were many risks in oil and gas exploration, he said.

Chief financial officer of PetroSA, Lindiwe Bakoro, was insistent that as a result of long delays in exploration any hope of immediate profits might be delayed but long term viability had been planned for and this was expected.  Consequently, new valuations on assets were undertaken to re-gear the project with treasury permission.  However, Bakoro confirmed that PetroSA would await the final results of drilling and connection before any final write down-decision on the impairment took place.

Purchasing procedures

On other irregular expenditure items, totalling some R30m, that appeared in the CEF results noted by the AG, these again were for PetroSA.   Such were mainly as a result of the correct procedures not having been followed in terms of procurement procedure. 

The correct procedures were now followed throughout the CEF group, Mncwango said, and the AG had been satisfied on this subject, since the annual report had not been qualified. A specific “irregular” figure of R1.6bn was also reported for PetroSA in respect of its Ghana operations.

Again it was explained that this was a procedural and the necessary documentation on transfer of monies had been incorrectly processed.   It would appear that treasury permission had been applied for and granted in 2013 but the actual transfer of R1.6bn had taken place in 2014, a different financial year for the record. CEF reported that PetroSA, nevertheless, had shown a particularly good return for the first time on its Ghanaian liquid fuels investment, returning a profit for 2013/4 of some R560m

On or off. Who knows?

Asked if any discussions with Engen on downstream development in the name of PetroSA had progressed, CEF’s Mncwango said that any such discussions were confidential and he would not be drawn into further explanations since these were commercially sensitive, whether with Engen or any other body in the liquid fuels sector.

Ms. Nosizwe Nokwe-Macamo, CEO of PetroSA, concluded that steps were taken to effectively manage fruitless, wasteful and irregular expenditure and that the focus for the national fuels group in the period ahead included delivery on Project Ikhwezi and finalising funding arrangements for “downstream entry”.

Gas plan on the way

The meeting was attended by the deputy minister of energy, who said she was confident that steps taken by both CEF and PetroSA were in the interests of the national strategy on gas supplies and that cabinet were shortly to debate the gas utilization master plan (GUMP). This was in response to opposition members who had complained to the minister that South Africa’s liquid fuels and energy plans could not be finalised until the state’s future gas supply scenario was properly clarified.

Other articles in this category or as background

http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/petrosa-has-high-hopes-with-the-chinese/ http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/cef-still-has-its-troubles/ http://parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/central-energy-fund-slowly-gets-its-house-in-order/

Posted in Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

CEF still has its troubles

CEF subsidiary SASDA faces closure

Reporting under the Central Energy Fund label during parliamentary presentations to the portfolio committee on energy, the South African Supplier Development Agency (SASDA) admitted that in incurring a loss of over R18m during 2011/12 and a loss estimated at R14.5m for the present year, shutdown or liquidation was inevitable.

Lunga Saki, acting CEO, said the situation had become untenable.

He described SASDA as the “driving force behind the liquid fuels charter” but that SASDA, with dwindling cash reserves and with CEF “having insufficient dividend flows from subsidiaries” had put tremendous pressure on SASDA’s ability to continue its work, funding for which at present existed as loans from the central group.

Directors anxious to resolve

CEF had said that as a body it was to approach the department of energy and industry players such as SAPIA on the future of SASDA.  A possible liquidation was on the books, since the directors of SASDA did not want to enter the realm where they, knowing that SASDA had liabilities which exceeded its assets, could be accused of reckless trading and SASDA receiving qualifications from the auditor general with them at the reins.

SASDA focused on mentoring and coaching, providing technical support, skills training, facilitated access to raw materials, project management and they claimed facilitated financial support to CEF projects.

General picture

Sizwe Mncwango, CEO of CEF, in reporting to Parliament on overall group activities, excluding that of subsidiary PetroSA which in view of its size and structure reported separately, said he would focus on the work of CEF excluding this

CEF was in the process of restructuring for growth, he said. He saw the group as contributing to national security of energy supply dealing in renewables, oil and gas, strategic storage, licencing, mining development projects and supplier development issues within the energy field.

In clean energy, CEF’s project at Solar Park had a mission of developing renewable energy and low smoke fuel projects and agreements for solar water heaters had been signed in cooperation with the departments of human settlements and energy. Their second phase of this successful project was about to start. Photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing was being investigated.

Strategic stocks

On strategic stocks and storage facilities the company stored and managed third party crude oil on a commercial basis in order to fund the oil pollution prevention and control activities at the Saldanha Bay, Milnerton and Ogies facilities. There was a major project which included office refurbishment at the Milnerton Tank Farm, with tank refurbishment being undertaken with more sourcing of additional strategic stock tanks required.

A warning was given that the oil pollution sea vessels were aged and the fleet was urgently in need of refurbishment.

David Van Der Spuy, acting general manager at the Promotion Petroleum Agency South Africa (PASA), explained to parliamentarians the implication  of section 71 of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (MPRDA) on the need to promote onshore and offshore exploration and production of petroleum, monitor and report regularly to the Minister in respect of compliance on permit, rights and licensing.

PASA faced a funding problem, he said, but the regulation of MPRDA remained an imperative and could not be threatened.

CEF coal venture

CEF also reported on its small coal mining venture at Vlakfontein, Mpumalanga, run by a subsidiary African Exploration Mining and Finance (AEMFC) which amounted to a pilot development and which was successfully mining 1.5m tons of coal, with no fatalities.

This financed a mining exploration venture known as Pan African Minerals Development Corporation (PAMDC and was driving PAMDC’s additional coal exploration programme. CEF investments shareholding in PAMDC was 33.3%, AEMFC being a 49% participant at project level but the group was searching for third party funding to hive the project off and engagement with the department of mineral resources was positive.

Sizwe Mncwango told parliamentarians that this was the main objective of CEF in building successful energy participants and letting them flourish on their own, once identified as a successful participants in the energy environment

PetroSA a separate issue

Such was the case with PetroSA, a part of CEF, who would report to Parliament in their own right, Mncwango said.

On questioning it became clear that, aside from the SASDA problem, much of the focus on the balance sheet had been in the creation of loans and funding for PetroSA. Consequently CEF, other than certain mandates such as that retained by PASA in licensing and oil spillage, was mainly involved in support programmes, skills development and sustainability of projects which involved the state’s drive to make contributions in the energy field.
Associated articles archived
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/central-energy-fund-slowly-gets-its-house-in-order/

 

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Sanedi plans for a low carbon future

Carbon capture drilling underway….

SANEDI (SA National Energy Development Institute) was a “catalyst” for South Africa in the development of clean energy technologies and was this year spending, said its CEO, Kevin Nassiep, some R69m on its carbon capture project with drilling operations in the Eastern Cape, near Port Elizabeth.

It was also deploying R71m developing a business case and development plan for “smart grids” in South Africa incorporating clean energy into local energy uses.

Working with gas and cars

Other projects were its co-ordination programme with department of energy on the possibility of shale gas in the Karoo and the development of the electric car with the “green car” programme based out of Pretoria. On energy saving, SANEDI said it was working with PetroSA.

Nassiep said, when it came to each project the country wanted to involve itself in, South Africa had to decide first whether it was better to be an innovator, even an inventor, with the creation of a new technology: whether it was better to be a late follower of something that was recent and to add value or “localise” the project, or whether it was simply best to be a buyer of existing energy technologies or products straight from the product shelf.

In the case of carbon capture, SANEDI was either a developer and leader or could add value to what it existed elsewhere adding to its own knowledge. By the end of the year SANEDI could make a final assessment and take the right course on carbon capture.

Funding from overseas

To this end, SANEDI was working with various portions of SA industry; the Norwegian government and had access to the ₤25m fund that the UK government has placed in the World Bank Carbon Capture and Storage Trust Fund.

Members asked why ethanol gel could not be sold and developed as a low cost energy fuel rather than say, LP gas.    SANEDI responded with the answer that in their view it was a question of consumerism. Whilst ethanol gel could be much safer, it would not land up cheaper or more available until products that used it had been developed and a market demand had been developed.

It was the same with the electric car, Nassiep said.    It had to be at a good price, conveniently refueled or re-charged, safe and highly preferred in the market place.

(The writer asked Kevin Nassiep if he thought or if there had been any discussions that any funding for carbon capture drilling might come out of a “ring fenced” fund from a possible carbon tax but he said that he, SANEDI or even CEF would not have the slightest idea on this. Only treasury, he commented personally, would have any insight on this.)

Associated articles archived
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/sanedi-to-become-a-force-in-energy-research/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/carbon-capture-storage-technology-underway-in-sa/

Posted in Energy, Enviro,Water, Health, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

SANEDI to become a force in energy research

The South African National Energy Development Institute (SANEDI) is now clearly establishing itself as a research, evaluation and monitoring body, shedding its developmental nature at the request of the department of energy (DOE). Its main mission currently is to assist in the transition of South Africa towards a sustainable and low carbon energy future. SANEDI says it plans to become major energy research body in South Africa.

So said Kadri Nassiep, CEO of SANEDI, to members of the portfolio committee on energy when addressing them on the 2011/2012 audit recently completed by the department of performance, monitoring and evaluation (DPME) on SANEDI on its activities for the year.  Nassiep said it was setting up a data base on energy efficiencies in order to establish a consolidated picture on the subject for the whole of South Africa.

DPME expressed their satisfaction that SANEDI was on target in most areas of performance and was meeting delivery service. The auditor general has given SANEDI an unqualified clearance on its balance sheet for the year 2011/12.

SANEDI, which grew out of SANEIRI when under the aegis of the Central Energy Fund, had recently launched a wind atlas for South Africa; is dealing extensively in coal research and carbon extraction: and, furthermore, on carbon capture and storage issues.

The research institute, Nassiep said, had as an objective a wish to be recognised as the foremost institution for renewable energy research coordination and collaboration.

Nassiep reported to parliamentarians that SANEDI had established RECORD or renewable energy centre of development, which was mainly dealing with wind energy issues in the Northern Cape and solar energy initiatives in KwaZulu Natal and was receiving financial assistance from GIZ of Germany.

Initiatives on “green transport” were not on track he reported, however, in the area of fuel efficiency and fuel efficient innovations in new kinds of transport. Similarly, the “smart grid” business plan had not reached the stage of business buy-in although much work had been done.

In answer to questions, he said “smart grid” involved disciplines where the national transmission grid became more reliable; more secure; more economic and more efficient by applying more modern and advanced technologies to energy distribution and would involve the technology of such groups as Siemens.

Initiatives to reduce the carbon footprint in South Africa were ongoing, Nassiep concluded, but he would not get involved in MPs questions on whether South Africa should introduce a vehicle scrapping programme,  nor would he be drawn on the issue of SANEDI”s views on job losses by switching from coal to gain reduction of CO2 gases as part of the climate change debate.

Posted in Electricity, Energy, Fuel,oil,renewables, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Transport, Uncategorized0 Comments

Parliament lists its recommendations to minister of energy

In a parliamentary report on the department of energy’s strategic report for the year 2011/2, of which the final recommendations will go to the minister of energy, a call was made for “loopholes” in the Petroleum Products Act to be expedited and to increase funding of both the nuclear regulator (Nersa) and the Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa (Necsa).

Both Nersa and Necsa had drawn attention in their annual budget vote presentations earlier to Parliament on the general shortage of funds appropriated in terms of Pravin Gordhan’s 2012/3 budget, Nersa complaining that their budget was so insufficiently funded as to become a “danger to South Africa”.

On the subject of Nersa, the final page of the committee’s report to the minister states that Nersa should have its “mandate increased” to cover “petroleum pipeline and piped gas” and also to deal with the “deteriorating electricity infrastructure situation”. The report also said that Nersa should involve itself in South Africa’s nuclear build programme, as should Necsa.

In the subject of electricity distribution, recommendations included the necessity of introducing urgently the smart grid plans which became evident during departmental presentations. They drew attention to the SANEDI plan, called by the Central Energy Fund a “Smarter Grid”, which was the integration of two main utility infrastructures in South Africa, the electricity grid and the existing information and the telecommunications infrastructure.

The committee drew the attention of the minister to their concern on the continued reliance on the Sasol pipeline carrying natural gas from Mozambique, asking the minister to note their views that gas exploitation would become a major issue in the development of Southern Africa.

They noted that refinery capacity figures were “very low”, as evidenced by the quantity and volumes being imported, and that storage capacity and infrastructure development in this area was therefore an immediate necessity. On refineries generally, the committee noted the “very encouraging stance” adopted by PetroSA on its own refinery project, “Project Mathombo”.

The committee drew attention to the work of the South African Supplier Development Agency (SASDA) to accelerate progress in the development of black suppliers in terms of BBEEE and economic growth plans of government but said that “Engen, BP, Shell and Chevron have not contributed at all to transformation in the areas where SASDA was involved”.

The recommendations to the minister pointed out that promises were made in terms of the agreements signed “but nothing has happened”. SASDA’s attempts to get the companies on board, “even after engaging their respective CEO’s, had proved fruitless”.

 

 

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Uncategorized0 Comments


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