Tag Archive | Cabinet

Parliament: National Assembly traffic jam

editorial…….

Massive public service vs National Assembly…..

During the last few weeks, the sheer volume of meetings in the National Assembly of Parliament to consider eachnational assembly members government departmental budget vote and each of the departmental five-year strategic plans has been overwhelming. Little of legislative consequence emerges during such a period each year, other than the tabling of technocrat Bills rather than important policy making legislation.

Sadly to say, not too much attention is paid by the media to any of these meetings. Big plans, impressive targets, promises to overhaul this, that and the other. Most working journalists of experience have seen it all before and mostly they try to get statements on issues from either the Minister or Deputy Minister beforehand.

Time is of the essence for all. But why is this period of the parliamentary diary so extraordinarily busy?

Traffic jam in Parliament

There is unfortunately a simple answer. With too many people trying to do too much in limited government hours, the resulting traffic jam results from the fact that South Africa has probably one of the largest government structures per head of population in the world, if not the largest. If it was one of the best, as far as delivery was concerned, probably this might be acceptable but sadly it isn’t and most, both locally and internationally, know it.

unionbldgsIn the fight that has now started to prune costs, moving Parliament from Cape Town to Pretoria has been suggested on the basis that this might save considerable airfare costs, time spent sitting in aircraft and train seats when the country needs one’s administrative time in the office and pointless time spent on hotel accommodation honing up on the next day’s parliamentary presentation.

However, all of this is only a manifestation of the real problem and it does not answer the question of why Parliament is so busy at this time of year.

Odious comparisons

Minister of Finance, Pravin Gordhan is obviously in an extremely embarrassing position. He must realize himself that the Cabinet to which he belongs is arguably one the largest in the world evidenced by the fact that whilst there are thirty-five very highly paid ministers in the South African Cabinet, the USA has a “cabinet” of sixteen. China pushes it a bit with twenty-five and India manages one of the biggest populations in the world with twenty-three.

It all becomes slightly ludicrous when an additional thirty-seven Deputy Ministers are weighed in to Team South Africa.

Wrong ratio

Down the line and aside from the cost of running all these ministries, the thirty-five departments belonging toparliament mandela statue these Ministers, accompanied by some seventeen of the larger SOEs, must all report to a totally disproportionate number of MPs in Parliament, both in the portfolio committees in the National Assembly and the select committees in the NCOP.

Hence the parliamentary traffic jam at this time of year. All this at the cost of quality oversight (the job of Parliament) and the slowing down of urgently needed legislation. Meanwhile, the number of MPs is governed by the Constitution. The number of cabinet ministers and departments (and consequently the ballooning public service) is governed by the President.

The answer to the parliamentary traffic jam problem and the imperilled and much-needed cost saving exercise in terms of the Budget is therefore really a complete no-brainer.
Previous articles on category subject
The big SA cabinet crunch – ParlyReportSA
Special cabinet statement might correct damage to SA – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, earlier editorials, Facebook and Twitter, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Public utilities0 Comments

Special cabinet statement might correct damage to SA

Editorial…..

At last, a sensible special cabinet statement……

Sent to clients 15 Jan…On 13 January, a Special Cabinet Statement was issued and, as compared to previous irregular missives, the word “special” indicated some hope.   Instead of just containing the usual reasons for having to rejoice on certain public holidays, details of the passing of MK operatives and certain Bills approved, the latest document was full of economic facts and financial fiscal information placing a positive spin on the current economic gloom. At last, an acknowledgement that there is a hand on the tiller.

Clearly there has been a palace revolution, if only in this sphere alone.

As the Cabinet Lekgotla is planned, Parliament also prepares to receive it’s parliamentarians all fresh from the respective political party get-to-gethers. A lot has changed since they all parted company and quite likely a lot more is to change before MPs gather for their first meetings.

No doubt the EFF will try to make a circus out of things but nevertheless the show will go on.    However, EFF or not, it is becoming more and more difficult to sort out between political comment, which is not our focus, and the mechanics of State policy and its direction, oversight on financial issues and legislative alerts that affect business and industry.

Bad four days

Rob-DaviesRed lights are flashing in all camps, not least of which is the fact that it is difficult to tell who did the most damage to South African markets – China or President Zuma. In parliamentary terms, the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry seems determined to stand by SACP Minister of Trade Industry, Dr Rob Davies, in all matters dealing with BEE and trade agreements- as does DTI itself – and the Public Works Portfolio Committee seems unable to wear down SACP Minister, Jeremy Cronin, on issues regarding the Expropriation Bill.

Similarly, Lumka Yengeni’s Portfolio Committee on Labour Committee has no hope of a good outcome when it ordered, in the last session, an end to the shambles and confusion in Minister Mildred Oliphant’s Department of Labour, another Kwa-Zulu appointee of President Jacob Zuma.

Always a problem

Finally, despite some excellent MPs from all parties sitting in the Portfolio Committee on Energy, the vague report backs made to them by Department of Energy is leading to a sense of frustration in that particular Portfolio Committee which is not effective either as a result. In the area of good communications, Minister of Energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson can only be described as a menace.

The good news is that stalwart ANC Joanmariae Fubbs remains Chairperson of the Trade and Industry Portfolio Committee  and holds the ship steady with her disciplines. SACP executive Yunus Carrim stays as Chairperson of the Standing Committee on Finance and one wonders if he will see eye to eye in view of his ideologies with Minister Pravin Gordhan.

Overlooked as well

A Jacob Zuma appointee, Ebrahim Patel of COSATU fame but a hard worker and very leftist, remains Minister ofebrahim patel Economic Affairs but even he was overlooked for Minister of Finance when the President came up with name of David van Rooyen, who, to be quite frank, we had great difficulty in recalling his presence in Parliament over the last few months. A close shave but costly.

Back onto legislation. Whatever happened to the Private Security Industry Bill nobody knows but one hopes that the President was not using it to play silly games with the Obama administration on the AGOA issue. Maybe it gets discussed at the Lekgotla. Maybe not.

Politics ahead of economics 

In the meanwhile, one hopes that the message is got through at the Cabinet Lekgotla that what the President says vitally affects each one of his citizens and that that the private and personal politics being played out at the moment are particularly damaging to the business of Parliament and its relationship with commerce and industry.

Just as importantly, there has to be a better understanding in government departments when reporting to Parliament why business institutions need clarity of policy to gain investment confidence.

opening parliamentParliament is an important and independent tool of democracy in the fight against autocracy but so many departments seem more in awe of the auditor general than they are of the need for answers to parliamentary questioning and attempts to get the truth.

Posted in cabinet, Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts0 Comments

The big SA cabinet crunch

Editorial….

Cabinet hopes are Brown, Ramaphosa, Gordhan…..

Public Enterprises Minister, Lynne Brown, reports that she is to introduce as a cabinet draft, the Lynne BrownShareholder Management Bill as part of a plan to introduce leadership ability and some form of continuity for the state owned enterprises (SOCs) under her control.   This includes Eskom, Transnet, Denel, SA Express, Alexkor and Safcol.

We hope this is the start of something big.

The last few weeks have been an exercise in disaster, so let’s try and take a positive spin on things from a parliamentary viewpoint. Whilst troubled SAA is now an independent, falling under National Treasury and if President Zuma minds his own business, Minister Pravin Gordhan is to sort out National Treasury itself and also the troubled SARS, which he re-designed in the first place and which became such a success working with Trevor Manuel.

More problem children

Meanwhile, PetroSA is in real deep water falling, the entity falling under Central Energy Fund (CEF) reporting to Department and Energy (DOE). With Minister Joemat-Pettersson not back from COP21 or wherever, the country still faces some serious energy issues. But at least the PetroSA problem is now all in the open, with somebody obviously having to take over the reins and the mess, probably CEF itself.
Oddly enough there are people in CEF who know exactly what the problem is but once again politicians pushed experts in the wrong direction, it appears.

In addition, the Passenger Rail Association (PRASA) is very much on the slippery slope and, together with SANRAL, both present highly contentious transport issues which are now in the hands of Minister Cyril Ramaphosa to untangle. Troubling times indeed.

Public Enterprises comes to the party

lyne brown 2Now Minister Lynne Brown appears to be getting the senior management of her portfolio under control and whilst we could still have shutdowns at Eskom she says, because “machines can break down unexpectedly”, the leadership is there she says, as is the case with her Denel.
Lynne Brown recently reported that there are around 700 SOCs, an extraordinary fact, but bearing in mind the fact that South Africa is reputed to have the largest head count in public service per population count, this would appear quite possible.

On the road again

With Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa chairing an Integrated Marketing Committee, which will hopefullyramaphosa designate which entities should remain SOCs and those which should be absorbed back into their relevant departments, there appears some hope with regard to containing the ballooning public service machine which has characterised President Zuma’s presidency.

Hands off appointments

An essential element of Minister Lynne Brown’s plan is to remove the appointment to the boards of the entities under her domain away from cabinet and Ministers, including herself, to a shareholder management team that creates a leadership operational plan for all SOCs and appoints, through due process, a tightly run appointment book.

A brave proposition indeed but it does indicate that Minister Brown is her own person.

Whilst the proposals might look like state control, in fact it is a clear signal that government may have heard the message that the current system of Ministers appointing board members is not working, is open to abuse and what is worse, the consequent “jobs for the boys” system results in taxpayer’s money being thrown away through bad management, corruption and what the auditor general calls “useless and wasteful expenditure”.

On the drawing board

The Shareholder Management Bill, Minister Brown said in Johannesburg, will first need a concept paper (perhaps she means a White Paper) and such could be released after the February Cabinet Lekgotla in February, with an intention of introducing such as system by the end of 2016.

Whilst it is pretty obvious who should not be on such an appointment team, the plan begs the question of will be chosen to occupy such critical posts but it is far too early to cogitate on this one. With Ministers changing their portfolios as if it was a game of musical chairs, there is reason to congratulate Minister Brown on the statement that she herself as a Minister would be excluded from making appointments in her own SOCs.

Leadership needed

During the same address, she added that Eskom was “not out of the woods” yet and there was still not sufficient electricity to facilitate economic growth, but the leadership issue was being addressed satisfactorily with the right people being appointed. Brown said none of the entities under her control “would be approaching the National Treasury with begging bowls”.

Perhaps this is the principle being adopted behind the scenes with the SABC, which whilst not affecting business and industry other than travel costs, unlike trade and investment hurdles and industrial strategic changes, SABC is threatened by the possibility of being returned to its parent government department which at first glance appeared to be a move by President Zuma to gain control of state financed media, Mugabe style.

However, in a broad sense it seems to be Minister Brown’s idea that appointments to the top echelons running the country should be as a result of finding those qualified to do so rather than being handled by totally unqualified persons, some with solicitous intent, and others trying to retain power with dubious appointments such as having friends, in the case of the SABC, to broadcast “the truth” to specific rural audiences.

Unprincipled governance remains the one of the biggest problems facing South Africa, intrinsically coupled to (and in some cases causing} lack of growth and lack of jobs.

Croneyism

Bad appointments by Ministers and of Ministers has been the cornerstone of control by patronage, the route for corruption and the reason for sheer bad management, a practice now openly exposed but not yet controlled by any means. From a parliamentary viewpoint, let us leave it there. The rest is being said by the media but most MPs when they return to Parliament in late January 2016 will have realized that sheer stupidity can ruin their own futures and their pensions.

But if Minister Lynne Brown, in her practical and down to earth manner, can come up with the remarkable idea of Cabinet Ministers, hopefully including the Presidency as well, not interfering in who does what as far as expertise is concerned, then perhaps this can be applied to all 47 government departments and agencies.

One small step

No doubt as far as confirmation of an appointment, the Minister involved may still have to “approve” such a decision but it is worth watching the outcome of the debate on the shortly-to-be tabled Broadcasting Bill, if only to see if the appointment of inept senior appointments can be halted or reversed.

What has come out of the Eskom, PRASA and PetroSA issues is that a bad leader with no qualification or right to be in a position of leadership, or worse led by one who has supplied fraudulent qualifications, leads to frustration and anger by those with genuine skills and high academic qualifications lower down the ladder at the coalface. This is in the space of government service where technical skills are located and badly needed.

We hope Minister Lynne Brown has more of these “eureka” moments.

Posted in cabinet, earlier editorials, Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn0 Comments

Treasury proposals on debt control approved

Tough measures on debt approved by cabinet….

squeeze To counter what is feared in some quarters as a minor debt “bubble”, as occurred in the United States and set of a major run on banks, National Treasury have had approved by cabinet tough proposed measures to assist over-indebted households and prevent consumers from becoming over-indebted in future.

A number of ministers have supported Pravin Gordhan’s observations, stated in his Medium Term Budget Statement, that the curbing of reckless lending is a priority for government. Growing debt issues in middle to lower income groups has been an issue with rating agencies.

Over-debtedness the issue

Despite fierce opposition to a credit amnesty earlier, which was perceived as simply contributing to such a “bubble”, the measures that were approved by cabinet recently include an “immediate set of comprehensive steps” to tackle over-indebtedness in lower and middle income situations.

Such measures include insisting on affordability criteria in place for retail lenders and prohibiting reckless loans; ensuring that the provision of credit is suitable for each circumstance and reviewing National Credit Act pricing caps; there will be a “strengthening of regulation and enforcement to prevent unregistered credit providers and a review the regulatory framework for credit insurance policies.

The expression “controlling access to the payment system” was used.

Whole household approach considered

Government is also considering providing assistance to households labouring under a debt burden. No details emerged on this particular issue but some of the proposed measures included steps include reducing borrowers’ installment burdens; the setting up of voluntary debt relief measures within major lenders and regulating debt-collection firms.

Most importantly, employers will also be encouraged to investigate the legitimacy of all emolument attachment or garnishee orders in force against their employees. Treasury says such measures will be implemented within the public sector early next year; the department of trade and industry working with Treasury.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Finance, economic, Labour, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Brief on new draft energy and electricity bills

The director general of the energy department, Nelisiwe Magubane, has now briefed Parliament on the impending tabling of both the National Energy Regulator Amendment Bill and the Electricity Regulation Amendment Bill which, according Magubane will beef up NERSA giving it the regulatory power to control “the entire energy space”.

She told the parliamentary committee on energy that that an independent appeal board headed up by a judge would replace the existing tribunal so that NERSA did not have to play both judge and jury in regulatory matters, where a decision on tariffs or regulatory procedures were involved. Appeals would therefore conducted in a fairer environment.

Both bills have been the subject of public comment and it remains to be seen what the final Bills tabled before Parliament look like. On electricity, much involves independent power producers (IPPs) and may sort out the anomalies that exist in the procurement of land for power line erection and the difficult liaison with the department of public works over such issues.

As far as the Energy Regulator Act (ERA) is concerned, the amendments proposed to parliamentarians were stated as being designed to “improve the credibility of the decision making process by establishing an appeals board; to improve the governance and accountability of the board and to improve the working relations amongst regulator members.”

The department of energy said that the energy sector had to be regulated more effectively “given the current need that has now arisen to increase private sector participation”.

Present at the briefing were officials of NERSA who also claimed, as did the department, that both new Bills would enable them to have the ability to work in a less fragmented environment with not so many departments having regulatory control over different issues.

NERSA at no stage discussed matters relating to fuel pricing and neither did the department. Further meetings are to follow.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Labour, Land,Agriculture, Mining, beneficiation, Trade & Industry0 Comments

New fuel pipeline will come at a cost

Brian Molefe, CEO of Transnet, told his audience at opening of the 550 kilometre multi-product fuel pipeline between Durban and Johannesburg that the cost of the new installation “will have to be recovered”.

In his opinion, the new pipeline “was one of the most cutting-edge and innovative infrastructure investments in the world”, the cost involved being given at R23.4bn at this stage, he said. It is understood that Transnet has applied to NERSA for a further 22% increase in tariff charges for the coming year, according to reports.

Last year’s tariff increase for fuel pumped is understood to have been just short of 60%. January 2012 has seen the new installation working alongside the older pipeline but the new line is only configured for diesel at this stage, with limited pumping facilities along its length.

Coming on top of a recent 43c per litre fuel price increase and the minister’s November call for “an audit” into refinery shortages, both fuel and electricity supply problems would seem to be moving in the same dismal direction leaving government and suppliers further apart.

On an up-beat note, Molefe told his audience that “the state-of-the-art pipeline” would also transport 93 and 95 octane petrol, low sulphur and ultralow sulphur diesel and jet fuel at a rate of “about three-million litres an hour”.  He said that eventually the capacity of the line was expected to be in the region of 26.7-billion litres of fuel a year.

Transnet pipelines head Charl Möller said the new pipeline would be upgraded in five phases up to 2032 as more pumping stations and metering points were added.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Labour, Land,Agriculture, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Davies to re-introduce his ailing BEE

Following the gazetting of a draft Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Amendment Bill in December 2011 for comment (60 days), trade and industry minister, Rob Davies, has recently indicated his view that the planned  amendments to BBBEE legislation would “seek to strengthen access to procurement opportunities and to assist with black enterprise development.”

He also indicated in his statement that fronting was a practice that had to be eliminated and penalties for non-compliance as far as regulations were concerned would be introduced in the legislation, which included jail sentences. How this would relate to the Liquid Fuels Charter is not clear. . In terms of the draft BBBEE Act Amendment Bill, the cabinet statement set out the proposed amendments, some of which included amendments including the penalties mentioned for non-compliance in terms of enterprise development, or lack of it, fronting and procurement elements not complied with in terms of the BBBEE scorecard.

Definitions of what is termed as fronting are given in order that legislation may apply and the appropriate regulations enforced. On this issue, much was passed on by minister of energy, Dipuo Peters from the energy conference in November 2011.   Minister Davies said that more emphasis was to be placed on enterprise development and procurement within key sectors, in terms of both the IPAP and new growth path plans. Incentives were to be created for broad based black ownership and the use of such tools as employee share ownership, co-operatives and community ownership.

Relevance to the Employment Equity Act was an important factor, Minister Davies said, as was aligning skills requirements to current and new skills development strategies involved in the new growth path and elsewhere. Targets for this, for procurement matters and enterprise development had to be “adjusted” accordingly, he said.

Meanwhile, Minister Dipuo Peters also welcomed the BBBEE legislation as contributing towards the objectives of the liquid fuels charter. Challenges facing her department were irregular monitoring of compliance, pockets of poor performance within the value chain and lack of financially sound BEE deals, she said late last year.

She also added that her department was looking at ways to strengthen liquid fuels strategic stocks to cover any emergencies that might arise.

She advised the media in November the compliance report on the liquid fuels charter had been submitted to the cabinet for approval. At the time, she expressed her view that current shareholding was not spread uniformly across the value chain and total assets spread in line with demographics, noting that whilst technical issues such as access to storage facilities was a significant problem. In general, she complained that the participation of women, procurement and enterprise development lagged behind targets.

She also added that her department was looking at ways to strengthen liquid fuels strategic stocks to cover any emergencies that might arise. Her recent comments on the new BBBEE legislation were made in the light of Minister Davies announcement.

Reference to both BBBEE legislation and the Liquid Fuels Charter is expected to come up in President Zuma’s address to the nation.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Education, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Justice, constitutional, Labour, Land,Agriculture, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

DTI to form multi-billion rand incentives fund

The Minister of Trade and Industry has released the Special Economic Zones (SEZ) Bill for public comment. The SEZ Bill is expected to be tabled in Parliament later this year and Minister of trade and Industry Rob Davies says that in his view it is one of the most important developments of 2012 in order to achieve the objectives of the country’s economic planning programme.

DTI has now briefed the parliamentary trade and industry committee on the concepts behind the proposed legislation. According to the minister, the main objectives of the SEZ bill are:

• for the designation, development, promotion, operation and management of SEZs

• for the establishment of the SEZ board

• to regulate the application and issuing of SEZ operator permits • for the establishment of the SEZ fund

• decentralisation in the economy-broaden location of industrial development

Whilst claiming, as did the minister, that “the country now has a really effective plan to offer the investment community”, Lionel October, DTI’s director general, admitted the exact amount of finance at his department’s disposal to fund new special economic zones (SEZs) in South Africa still remains to be negotiated, although the matter has been agreed to in principle at cabinet level.

Nevertheless, he countered questioning at a parliamentary trade and industry committee presentation on this subject ,by saying that “Whilst we still have to fight a significant battle with Treasury on the size of a multi-billion rand incentives fund, it was significant that the DTI now has a proposal along the lines offered in China, Brazil and India”. (BRICS)

This plan, he said, will be supported by a Bill shortly to be introduced to Parliament and which would provide “the necessary predictability to such financing.”

October said the main problem in the past was that the present IDZs were not driven by incentives.   Only one development had taken place at Richards Bay, for example, he noted.  “Although any business plan must make economic sense as a first priority, we have learnt that any growth plan, as in BRICs countries, must be attached to incentives. “In the past, we were de-incentivising many potential areas just because they did not have a port, for example”.

In the new proposals, said October, the country would move away from very long plans and do what the Chinese have done successfully and focus on five-year plans.  He added that the competitive factor, where IDZs competed with each other, had to be stopped and that a “joint marketing proposal approach” had to be adopted for the whole country.

“This was the purpose of dividing the country into SEZs”, he said, and to build a national team to market the country’s proposals.

In terms of the new Bill, there were to be different categories of SEZs, such as industrial development zones, industrial parks or estates, science and technology parks, spatial development corridors and sector development zones.   October quoted successful examples of SEZs in Shanghai, Oman and Malaysia.

Problems had been encountered, October said, with the previous concept of the smaller IDZs over the past few years and the idea had not worked particularly well. Main problems had been that previously designated areas favoured those with international airport or seaports and penalized other areas for not having such.

The DTI’s contribution into the four areas of Richards Bay, East London, Coega and OR Tambo and Saldanha for forty projects had been 5.3bn or an approximate 5.7% return.

Lionel October emphasised that the IDZ programme had not been incentive driven. There had also been too much emphasis on infrastructure, whilst other issues such as logistics, marketing and skills supply had been on the back-burner.

The IDZ programme had “lacked a unique value proposition”, he said, and too many messages were going out to the investment community. There needed to be a single strategy and message from one place, said October.

He noted that now, with the promise from Treasury in October’s medium term budget that R10bn would be put aside for investment purposes, the new plan, supported by legislation, had become an exciting prospect and the new national regulatory environment would not only give the host zone but the whole region total involvement and the added ability to put in place longer term planning for an entire area.

The new Bill also provided for five parties to be involved in the process; namely, the DTI, Treasury, all three tiers of government, Eskom and Transnet, all parties being involved on a SEZ board set up by the new Bill. Other important parastatals could be added if relevant, October said.

MPs commented that no such plan would work unless government parastatals were on board to help plan infrastructure needed.

When asked by an ANC MP why labour was not represented in the planning structures, Lionel October responded frankly by saying that such a planning process could not be subjected to the issue of collective labour bargaining at that stage of the investment process, although the supply of skilled labour was a major issue.

He detailed the financing instruments as a fund to be established by the minister of trade and industry in consultation with the ministry of finance and development finance institutions (DFIs), which would play a major role in the development of a particular SEZ, liaising on marketing, capacity development, skills strategies, infrastructure, business incubation, environmental protection, technology and R&D and, finally, quality and productivity.

He would not talk on the subject of specific incentive numbers, saying that incentives had always been granted in the past but that in the future any incentives and incentive programmes would be the subject of far more focus with proper funding to make more things possible.

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Communications, Education, Electricity, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Health, Labour, Land,Agriculture, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments


This website is Archival

If you want your publications as they come from Parliament please contact ParlyReportSA directly. All information on this site is posted two weeks after client alert reports sent out.

Upcoming Articles

  1. MPRDA : Shale gas developers not satisfied
  2. Environmental Bill changes EIAs
  3. Border Mangement Bill grinds through Parliament

Earlier Editorials

Earlier Stories

  • Anti Corruption Unit overwhelmed

    Focus on top down elements of patronage  ….editorial….As Parliament went into short recess, the Anti-Corruption Unit, the combined team made up of SARS, Hawks, the National Prosecuting Authority and Justice Department, divulged […]

  • PIC comes under pressure to disclose

    Unlisted investments of PIC queried…. When asked for information on how the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) had invested its funds, Dr  Daniel Matjila, Chief Executive Officer, told parliamentarians that the most […]

  • International Arbitration Bill to replace BITs

    Arbitration Bill gets SA in line with UNCTRAL ….. The tabling of the International Arbitration Bill in Parliament will see ‘normalisation’ on a number of issues regarding arbitration between foreign companies […]

  • Parliament rattled by Sizani departure

    Closed ranks on Sizani resignation….. As South Africa struggles with the backlash of having had three finance ministers rotated in four days and news echoes around the parliamentary precinct that […]

  • Protected Disclosures Bill: employer to be involved

    New Protected Disclosures Bill ups protection…. sent to clients 21 January……The Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Affairs will shortly be debating the recently tabled Protected Disclosures Amendment Bill which proposes a duty […]