Tag Archive | bus system

Troubled bus industry goes to Parliament

SA bus industry operators in trouble

lowveld-bus-The South African bus system is on the verge of collapse, says the Southern Africa Bus Operators Association (SABOA) and, as the second largest mode of transport in SA behind only taxi transport, this fact was bad news for both commuters and those in industry and commerce whose workers use it extensively, Parliament was told.

Professor Jackie Walters, of the University of Johannesburg and strategic advisor to SABOA, told the portfolio committee on transport that, by its nature, the bus industry in South Africa was partially subsidised and was one of the only countries in the world that seemed to manage on month-to-month contracts.

Subsidies out of date

The bus industry in the past, in order to receive it’s subsidies, worked its calculations on the basis of commuters carried but the industry had slowly switched to contracts where kilometers covered are now the basis for calculation, a preferable system in the industry.  However there had been no extensions or expansion allowed in kilometers covered by subsidies for thirteen years.

Prof. Walters maintained that the bus industry performed a critical role in balancing demand and the pricing system within the public transport system.

The policy applicable to the commuter bus industry was founded on the White Paper on National Transport Policy of 1996, and in a number of other documents such as the Moving South Africa Strategy (MSA), the National Land Transport Transition Act of 2000 (NLTTA) as well as a Model Tender Document and the Heads of Agreement (HOA) between organised labour and the Department of Transport (DOT).

Money disappearing

He told parliamentarians that it was the Southern African Bus Operators Association (SABOA) that regulated aspects of the tendering system but the industry was under stress due to the unintended consequences of Division of Revenue Act (DORA) and the bus contracting system to the government, which was supposed to provide financial stability for industry. Whilst funds may be allocated under DORA to provinces, what happened after that was out of control of central government.

The financial stability intended for the bus industry to provide for commuters was a theory but on the ground quite the opposite was happening, he maintained.   This short-term horizon for the industry made longer-term investment decisions difficult and banks were reluctant to provide funding because of the uncertainty over the future of the contracts.  “No industry can operate on this basis‚” Prof. Walters said.

No windfalls, no shortfalls even

He attributed the problem again to the negative effect of DORA, which left it to provinces to make up the difference between the public transport operations grant allocated to provinces by national treasury and an agreed-upon escalation rate‚ which was linked to increases in the consumer price index.  Provinces continually claimed that they did not have the money to make up the shortfall.

Prof. Walters said the government had not taken into account at any stage the onerous operational cost increases that bus companies had to bear; namely 44% for labour‚ 28% for maintenance and the national escalation on fuel. There had to be risk sharing between government and the operators, he said.

 

No conformity

There were different types of contracts in the industry, he went on to explain, some which were seventeen years old and which were supposed to have been transformed after three years with competitive tendering and negotiation of contracts.

He said that in all there were 39 interim contracts in operation, 66 tender contracts and 10 negotiated contracts. The contract types in operation were based on a user-pays principle regarding the subsidies.

In conclusion, Prof Walters said that above all it was important to get national treasury to acknowledge the contracts and not leave things to the provinces.

DOT to investigate

MPs generally agreed that in the longer term, common ticketing systems over all services in the country generally had to be introduced, similar to that in the BRT system but a short term answer also had to be found to keep the industry alive in terms of the explanations from Dr Walters. 

DOT was told to  report back to Parliament.

Refer previous articles in this category
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/transport-subsidies-to-business-are-wrong-says-parliament/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/all-not-well-in-the-trucking-industry/

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