Expropriation Bill grinds on

Expropriation: “public interest” and “property”

3- day précis…sent to clients 2 Nov….. Parties are coming closer during debate in the Portfolio cronin3Committee on Public Works to a slightly watered down Expropriation Bill, with Deputy Minister of Public Works, Jeremy Cronin, leading for the Minister who tabled the Bill before Parliament.

The name of the Bill has not resonated well amongst the international business community in the light of other events in Southern Africa.

Nevertheless, Minister Cronin has stated that eventually such a Bill will succeed, despite the concerns of many parties and that the proposed Bill has no malevolent purpose other than assisting “in the public interest”.

The public interest?

Therein lies the problem in that it remains a state responsibility to decide what the public’s interest is and which “public” is the subject matter of any decision for invoking the legislation.   As is the case with so much legislation at the moment, it is therefore a question of the wording of the Minister’s powers and the definitions of the tools at his or her disposal which is of debate.

Most of the debate earlier had centered around the definition of “property to be expropriated” in the light of the fact that the Bill cannot exceed the powers of the Constitution, wherein the word “property” is also not expanded upon – a number of court precedents arising previously where no final determination was made on the subject.

Calling in the Constitution

At one stage, the Deputy Minister proposed that “property” could be defined as “contemplated in section 25 of the Constitution”, the Deputy Minister considering this a major concession by the Department.  However, Opposition members still claimed that the word “property” could not be used in any piece of legislation without a definition of the term “property” also being listed and also in the knowledge that such terminology could not be contextualized even in terms of the Constitution.

On what could be expropriated, the Deputy Minister presented another alternative wording stating the that “the Minister’s power to expropriate property applies to property which is connected to the provision and management of the accommodation, land and infrastructure needs of an organ of state, in terms of his or her mandate”.

This was not found to be satisfactory either by the Committee since the term “that does not fall within his mandate” was vague and could be determined in any number of ways and open to any kind of interpretation.

The Deputy Minister was advised by senior counsel the way the Constitutional Court defined property land seizureremained “ a moving target”, especially section 25, and also in the Bill of Rights and this matter needed to be looked at again.

New draft for discussion

The Deputy Minister is to return to the next meeting with a further proposal on the definition of property issue which would possibly be part of a “B” version of the Bill, then to be reconsidered in totality by the committee. Such will be ready in a few days.

Another alteration of major importance so far is that a new wording using the expression “disputing party” has used in some cases instead of “claimant”. This is now used to describe “claimants” where they no longer are such in the process of expropriation, particularly in not accepting the amount of compensation offered. This is important, as thus the Bill and the parties will accept that indeed a dispute has occurred.

Two months in debate

At this stage the Bill has had three full days of “clause by clause” debate with more to come, draft clauses flying backwards and forwards, the final to be proposed by the Minister as agreed to and under the guidance of the State Law Advisor representing the State’s last offer of compromise and agreement to change wording and those changes as so far agreed to by the Committee.

Minister Cronin still maintains infrastructure projects are being held up, having to be changed or stopped. He had earlier called upon Eskom to give evidence of this.

There is general agreement that Deputy Minister Jeremy Cronin has bent over backwards with subsequent alterations to meet demands but there still exists amongst Opposition a feeling that ulterior motives exist for the legislation and the legislation is not simply “to assist Eskom buy land for electricity development”, as Minister Cronin first declared.  In the background is the threat of a constitutional challenge but this has dissipated somewhat.

The “E” word

pylonsMuch of the debate has also centered around the issues of “municipal planning” and “powers of municipal mangers” giving credence to Minister Cronin’s views. He has said the word “expropriation” is a loaded expression at this time in Africa’s history and has an unfortunate influence on the necessity for the Bill to proceed.

There is also change, seen by Opposition members as an improvement, which deals with the mediation process which previously allowed the expropriating authority to use the absence of a timeous response to bypass the process of mediation. This is not now the case, the issue of mediation being allowed to proceed under any circumstances should this be required.

Progress

More debate is to follow in subsequent days but a final document will no doubt be voted on by the committee shortly before going to the National Assembly, probably in this session of Parliament. In a meeting subsequently, a “B” version of the Bill was introduced and Chapter 4 on Intentions to Expropriate and Expropriation of Property was completed to the satisfaction of most, leaving the impression that much of the steam about the Bill in general had been reduced.

The issue of the definition of “property”, however, still remains a contentious issue simply because of legal determinations.  On 21 October, to expropriate where there was a mortgage bond was debated at length and satisfaction reached and that notice to the expropriated party and any farm workers or dwellers must be simultaneous before the issue of “just and equitable compensation” is considered.

More serious issues

On 27 October the major issue of debate involved the term of “just and equitable” compensation in the Constitution and how this would be applied to the expropriation process in the Bill.

Also debated was the question of a large community being expropriated and whether water availability, dwelling provision and the needs of a community restored. The Minister explained that the Expropriation Bill per se was about expropriation and the process and not about land reform and for this process there was plenty of legislation already to hand and new legislation planned.

The following week of November, however, should see this matter resolved mid-month providing hecronin current NEHAWU strike action of disturbing meetings does not continue, but whether all will be to the satisfaction of each party has become somewhat academic, it becoming more and more evident that Deputy Minister Cronin, who has handled each stage of the process personally, seems determined, in his patient and determined way, to see this Bill through with the property clause undefined.

Last minute attack

The EFF attempted to delete the whole of chapter 5 on compensation in the Bill as they maintained that the subject matter was expropriation, not compensation at all but such a suggestion was put aside by the chairperson Ben Martins as a political ploy rather than a serious contribution.

Other articles in this category or as background
Expropriation Bill phrases could be re-drafted – ParlyReportSA
Expropriation Bill has now to be faced – ParlyReportSA
Zuma goes for traditional support with expropriation – ParlyReportSA
Expropriation of land stays constitutional – ParlyReportSA
Amended Expropriation Bill returns – ParlyReportSA

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