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Environmental legislation updates

Changes to environmental legislation….

dea logosent to clients 10 Oct….. The Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) has published for comment a whole series of amendments to the cluster of laws generally referred to as the NEMA laws, or South Africa’s national environmental legislation.

The changes affect mining and quarrying, the industrial and manufacturing sectors and relationships of the many sectors with local authorities on licensing.

The draft Bill refers to the overarching National Environmental Management Act; the National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act; National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act; the National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act; the National Environmental Management: Integrated Coastal Management Act and the National Environmental Management: Waste Act.

Piggy bank for closures

In the case of National Environmental Management Act a number of changes are proposed, perhaps the most notable being ” to provide clarity to the definition of “financial provision” that an applicant or holder of an environmental authorisation relating to mining activities must set aside financial provision for progressive mitigation, mine closure and the management of post closure environmental impacts”.

NEMA generally provides that if environmental harm is authorised by law, such as a permit issued under any environmental law, the relevant operator is obliged to minimise and rectify such harm. Where a person fails to take reasonable measures to minimise or rectify effects of environmental pollution or degradation, the relevant authority may itself take such measures, and recover costs from the responsible operator. Failed mining operations apparently have presented government with little option but to use taxpayer’s money.

With the recent amendment to provide for liability for historical pollution any operator occupying land may also be liable in future for remediation costs under the NEMA: Waste Act equally and this is notwithstanding that the activity is authorised by permit. All five laws are designed to intertwine, the Management Act amendments say.

Mineral Resources only

Other changes under the National Environmental Management Act provide clarity that “the Minister responsible for mineral resources is also responsible for listed or specified activities that is or Is directly related to prospecting, exploration, extraction or primary processing of a mineral or petroleum resource.” Various other changes are proposed which should be read by parties affected.

The changes under the NEM: Protected Areas Act are relatively minor providing for the chief financial officer of the SANParks to be on the board; various new offences in marine protected areas and to clarify certain offences andenvironmental2 procedures.

Again under the NEM: Biodiversity Act changes are proposed on board representation to include technical experts; steps, actions or methods to be undertaken to either control or eradicate listed invasive species and, importantly, to ensure that MECs in the provinces “must follow a consultation process when exercising legal powers” under the Act.

Air quality ; Who licences what

Under the NEM: Air Quality Act the issue of who does what is clarified for municipalities on listed unlawful activities and the proposals provide clarity on the issue of a provincial department responsible for environmental affairs is the licensing authority where a listed activity falls within the boundaries of more than one metropolitan municipality or more than one district municipality and to deal with appeal processes.
Other articles in this category or as background
NEMA: Waste Bill passed – ParlyReportSA
Environmental pace hots up – ParlyReportSATougher rules ahead with new evironmental Bill – ParlyReportCoastal environment bill proposals clearer – ParlyReport

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PetroSA on the rocks for R14.5bn

Project Apollo plan to save PetroSA…

Sent to clients 6 Oct.…..A team comprising of industry experts is now defining a new strategy to save the PetroSA struggling offshorePetroSA logo gas project on the East Coast.   The experts were not named but the exercise is entitled Project Apollo and reports were given to Parliament that the team has progressed well so far, said controlling body Central Energy Fund.

Despite producing a balance sheet that shows a technical cash profit of R2.5bn in simplistic terms made up of revenue less operating costs, in reality PetroSA is clearly beyond business rescue in proper commercial terms unless it manages to get a bail-out from Treasury to save the troubled entity from written off “impairments” of R14,5bn. But business rescue is on the way it would appear.

R11.7bn of the “impairment” was as a result under performance of its Project Ikhwezi to supply gas onshore to Mossgas.

Reality sets in

The total loss for 2014/5 was in reality R14.6bn after tax.      Project Apollo will now tackle the main cause of the loss at Ikwhezi, options stated as including “the maximisation of a number of upstream initiatives; the utilisation of tail gas; and how the gas-to-liquid refinery itself can be optimised with the new, revised and “limited under-supply of feedstock.”

cef logoThe Central Energy Fund (CFE), acting as the parent body for PetroSA, told Parliament that it is applying for such assistance, PetroSA being flagged by Cabinet some twelve years ago as “South Africa’s new state oil company”. CEF described PetroSA’s performance as merely “disappointing”, which raised the ire of most parliamentarians.

Those present

To add pain to the proceedings for Deputy Minister of Energy, Thembisile Majola, and senior heads of the Department of Energy (DOE) also in attendance together with the full board of CFE represented by new acting Chairman Wilfred Ngubane, the auditor general’s (AG) highly critical findings were read out one by one to MPs of the Portfolio Committee on Energy.

All this resulted in the remark from Opposition member, Gordon Mackay, that PetroSA “instead of becoming afikile majola national oil company had become a national disaster”. Criticism was levelled at both CEF and PetroSA across party lines, Chairman Fikile Majola demanding that Parliament conducts its own forensic audit and investigation into the facts that had led PetroSA to achieve such spectacular losses.

It appears that in the total accounting of the loss of R14.6bn for the year under review, R1.8m was also incurred in the form of non-performance penalties; stolen items of R110,000; over payments in retrenchment packages of some R3m; and R55,000 stock losses. Irregular transactions in contravention of company policy amounted to some R17m, the AG noted.

Lack of industry skills

Although the AG’s report was “unqualified” in terms of correct reporting, lack of management controls and bad investments were identified by the AG as the problem. In fact, acting CEO of PetroSA, Mapula Modipa, clearly inferred that lack of skills generally in the particular industry, lack of background knowledge in the international oil investment world and lack of experience in upstream strategic planning had led PetroSA year after year into its loss situation.

Particularly referring to troublesome investments in Ghana, Equatorial Guinea and continued exploration and production at Ikhwezi resulting in the “impairment”, a sort of write down of assets totalling R11.7bn, reports have been submitted before to the Portfolio Committee on Energy over the last two years. Warnings were given.

However in this meeting the AG’s views on the subject were under discussion and the terminology used by the AG could only be interpreted, as put by MPs, as poor management decision-making, lack of knowledge of the oil industry and the appropriate management skills in that area.

Roughnecks wrestle pipe on a True Company oil drilling rig outside WatfordHowever, over the years going back over previous annual reports for the last five years with forwards by Ministers and Cabinet statements issued over the period, it becomes self-evident that the “drive” to establish PetroSA as a state entity in the fuel and gas industry was politically driven, coupled with (as acting CEO Mapula Modipa had inferred) inexperience in the top echelons.

Still the Mossgas problem onshore

However, self- evident this year were the declining revenues from the wells at sea supplying Mossgas, where it was stated that now one wells had been abandoned, three were in operation and two had yet to be drilled. Project Inkwezi, against a target of 242bn barrels per cubic feet (bcf) only delivered 25 bcf from three wells. A “joint turnaround steering committee” had been formed to help on governance issues, technical performance and the speeding up of decision making. But the bcf is unlikely to change

Part of the new plan has involved of a “head count reduction” and employees had been notified. It was admitted that PetroSA had an obligation to rehabilitate or abandon its offshore and onshore operations costed at R9.3m in terms of the National Environmental Management Act and a funding gap of R9.3m now had to be bridged in the immediate future to pay this further outstanding in terms of the Act.

Further forensic audit

The cross-party call for an independent parliamentary forensic investigation that was made (which included thegordon mackay DA chairperson Fikile Majola as the driver behind the motion) “will hopefully not just result in a blame game”, said Opposition MP Mackay “but get to the bottom of how such an irresponsible number of management decisions with public money took place over so long a period.”

Chairperson Majola (ANC) concluded “This amount of money (R14, 5bn) cannot just be written off without someone being responsible.” He added, “There has appeared much difference between the abilities of technical staff and the technical knowledge of the leaders and decision makers on the board of PetroSA.”

Minister of Energy, Ms Joemat-Pettersson, was again absent from the meeting. However, earlier, in the meeting, the Deputy Minister standing in for her, said “when all is said and done we intend staying in this business”.

Nil from Necsa

necsaA meeting following in the same day, following the CEF presentation, was a report from the Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa) which failed to happen because Necsa were unable to produce an annual report or any report, Minister Joemat-Pettersson having obtained an extension of one month to the end of October for the annual report to be ready. Chairperson Majola said that the meeting could not take place without a financial report since oversight of such report was their mandate.

Opposition members complained that not only had Parliament’s time been wasted but that the whole instruction for Necsa to be present “appeared to be a media exercise to show that the governing party was on the ball”.

A litany of problems
The extension for the Annual Report conclusion had been granted to the Minister in terms of the Public Finance Management Act (PMFA), a fact well known, but the media were present in strength in the morning not only for the CEF’s explanation for the PetroSA loss but in the afternoon for Necsa explanation of its loss as a regulatory body, in the light of current media reports on irregularities, staff resignations and dismissals.

Other articles in this category or as background
PetroSA has high hopes with the Chinese – ParlyReportSA
CEF hurt by Mossel Bay losses – ParlyReportSA
Better year for PetroSA with offshore gas potential – ParlyReport

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Expropriation Bill grinds on

Expropriation: “public interest” and “property”

3- day précis…sent to clients 2 Nov….. Parties are coming closer during debate in the Portfolio cronin3Committee on Public Works to a slightly watered down Expropriation Bill, with Deputy Minister of Public Works, Jeremy Cronin, leading for the Minister who tabled the Bill before Parliament.

The name of the Bill has not resonated well amongst the international business community in the light of other events in Southern Africa.

Nevertheless, Minister Cronin has stated that eventually such a Bill will succeed, despite the concerns of many parties and that the proposed Bill has no malevolent purpose other than assisting “in the public interest”.

The public interest?

Therein lies the problem in that it remains a state responsibility to decide what the public’s interest is and which “public” is the subject matter of any decision for invoking the legislation.   As is the case with so much legislation at the moment, it is therefore a question of the wording of the Minister’s powers and the definitions of the tools at his or her disposal which is of debate.

Most of the debate earlier had centered around the definition of “property to be expropriated” in the light of the fact that the Bill cannot exceed the powers of the Constitution, wherein the word “property” is also not expanded upon – a number of court precedents arising previously where no final determination was made on the subject.

Calling in the Constitution

At one stage, the Deputy Minister proposed that “property” could be defined as “contemplated in section 25 of the Constitution”, the Deputy Minister considering this a major concession by the Department.  However, Opposition members still claimed that the word “property” could not be used in any piece of legislation without a definition of the term “property” also being listed and also in the knowledge that such terminology could not be contextualized even in terms of the Constitution.

On what could be expropriated, the Deputy Minister presented another alternative wording stating the that “the Minister’s power to expropriate property applies to property which is connected to the provision and management of the accommodation, land and infrastructure needs of an organ of state, in terms of his or her mandate”.

This was not found to be satisfactory either by the Committee since the term “that does not fall within his mandate” was vague and could be determined in any number of ways and open to any kind of interpretation.

The Deputy Minister was advised by senior counsel the way the Constitutional Court defined property land seizureremained “ a moving target”, especially section 25, and also in the Bill of Rights and this matter needed to be looked at again.

New draft for discussion

The Deputy Minister is to return to the next meeting with a further proposal on the definition of property issue which would possibly be part of a “B” version of the Bill, then to be reconsidered in totality by the committee. Such will be ready in a few days.

Another alteration of major importance so far is that a new wording using the expression “disputing party” has used in some cases instead of “claimant”. This is now used to describe “claimants” where they no longer are such in the process of expropriation, particularly in not accepting the amount of compensation offered. This is important, as thus the Bill and the parties will accept that indeed a dispute has occurred.

Two months in debate

At this stage the Bill has had three full days of “clause by clause” debate with more to come, draft clauses flying backwards and forwards, the final to be proposed by the Minister as agreed to and under the guidance of the State Law Advisor representing the State’s last offer of compromise and agreement to change wording and those changes as so far agreed to by the Committee.

Minister Cronin still maintains infrastructure projects are being held up, having to be changed or stopped. He had earlier called upon Eskom to give evidence of this.

There is general agreement that Deputy Minister Jeremy Cronin has bent over backwards with subsequent alterations to meet demands but there still exists amongst Opposition a feeling that ulterior motives exist for the legislation and the legislation is not simply “to assist Eskom buy land for electricity development”, as Minister Cronin first declared.  In the background is the threat of a constitutional challenge but this has dissipated somewhat.

The “E” word

pylonsMuch of the debate has also centered around the issues of “municipal planning” and “powers of municipal mangers” giving credence to Minister Cronin’s views. He has said the word “expropriation” is a loaded expression at this time in Africa’s history and has an unfortunate influence on the necessity for the Bill to proceed.

There is also change, seen by Opposition members as an improvement, which deals with the mediation process which previously allowed the expropriating authority to use the absence of a timeous response to bypass the process of mediation. This is not now the case, the issue of mediation being allowed to proceed under any circumstances should this be required.

Progress

More debate is to follow in subsequent days but a final document will no doubt be voted on by the committee shortly before going to the National Assembly, probably in this session of Parliament. In a meeting subsequently, a “B” version of the Bill was introduced and Chapter 4 on Intentions to Expropriate and Expropriation of Property was completed to the satisfaction of most, leaving the impression that much of the steam about the Bill in general had been reduced.

The issue of the definition of “property”, however, still remains a contentious issue simply because of legal determinations.  On 21 October, to expropriate where there was a mortgage bond was debated at length and satisfaction reached and that notice to the expropriated party and any farm workers or dwellers must be simultaneous before the issue of “just and equitable compensation” is considered.

More serious issues

On 27 October the major issue of debate involved the term of “just and equitable” compensation in the Constitution and how this would be applied to the expropriation process in the Bill.

Also debated was the question of a large community being expropriated and whether water availability, dwelling provision and the needs of a community restored. The Minister explained that the Expropriation Bill per se was about expropriation and the process and not about land reform and for this process there was plenty of legislation already to hand and new legislation planned.

The following week of November, however, should see this matter resolved mid-month providing hecronin current NEHAWU strike action of disturbing meetings does not continue, but whether all will be to the satisfaction of each party has become somewhat academic, it becoming more and more evident that Deputy Minister Cronin, who has handled each stage of the process personally, seems determined, in his patient and determined way, to see this Bill through with the property clause undefined.

Last minute attack

The EFF attempted to delete the whole of chapter 5 on compensation in the Bill as they maintained that the subject matter was expropriation, not compensation at all but such a suggestion was put aside by the chairperson Ben Martins as a political ploy rather than a serious contribution.

Other articles in this category or as background
Expropriation Bill phrases could be re-drafted – ParlyReportSA
Expropriation Bill has now to be faced – ParlyReportSA
Zuma goes for traditional support with expropriation – ParlyReportSA
Expropriation of land stays constitutional – ParlyReportSA
Amended Expropriation Bill returns – ParlyReportSA

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Draft Copyright Amendment Bill raises queries

Copyright Bill proposes revenues to state…

copyright graphicsent to clients 28 Oct….  Anomalies abound in the draft Copyright Amendment Bill, recently published for comment and now awaiting tabling in Parliament hopefully with a number of changes, say experts in the intellectual property industry.

The Bill primarily affects music, artistic and literary copyrights but the whole issue of patents, copyright and intellectual property rights are so intertwined that any changes will undoubtedly send up red flags up in various areas.

Government says in this instance it is trying to modernise the existing Copyright Act but as with any changes to established procedures that have existed for years, there are pros and cons that come with change it seems.

50 years after death

The draft Bill deals primarily with copyright of artistic, musical and literary work and most assume earphonesthat works of great composers such Brahms, Beethoven and Schubert are free of copyright, those geniuses having long since passed away. In fact under the existing Act, the author, composer or artist has copyright for life and then fifty years

The draft states both clearly and unambiguously that the ownership of all copyright held by individuals will automatically transfer to the state upon their death.

Until death do us part….

There is not the slightest indication of what body or entity is involved, other than the fact that the Bill is to be tabled by the Minister of Trade and Industry, meaning that DTI, or an entity controlled by it, would receive such, presumably the individual’s Estate being responsible for notifying DTI that they are heirs. The draft also states that government may never re-sell or pass on such copyrights.

The question to any casual observer is what happens to this money, at present collect by such bodies in doubtful manner by such bodies as SAMRO and passed to DTI? It is revenue and does it go to National Treasury, perhaps a fund for aged musicians, authors and artists even child education in the arts? On this the Bill is silent, no policy having been ever stated by any cabinet minister on such matters.

Another tribunal

In the absence of any new guides as promised on intellectual property in general, such having been promised by DTI in the form of a National IP Policy many months ago, more concerning is the establishment of an Intellectual Property Tribunal which is a case of “overkill” in dealing with this limited area of copyright and royalties.

Such a body may adjudicate on “on any application and on any legislation brought before it”, the draft supermarketstates.

On the whole, we have to assume that the majority of the draft Bill applies to individuals only, with the exception of the recording industry and literary reproduction industry, there also being certain clauses regarding End User Licence Agreements affecting software sales.

Criminalisation

Of concern though to many is the growing tendency to introduce criminalisation into legislation such as areas of BEE with fines normally reserved for more serious and harmful criminal police offences. In this case DTI have once again mentioned maximum jail and penalties of totally disproportionate periods and amounts.

To many, this Bill appears to have a lot more written in between the lines and prompts again many questions as to the direction DTI is taking with regard to international agreements, in this case the Agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights.

It will be interesting to see what is finally tabled in Parliament for debate and what emerges from parliamentary public hearings

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Green Paper on rail transport published

sent to clients 12 October…..

National rail policy mapped out…..

metrorailA Green Paper on South Africa’s National Rail Policy has been published for comment naming the country’s challenges in rail transportation, recommending policy direction and containing broad proposals for the way forward to develop the current rail network.

Gazetted recently, the Green Paper represents work commenced in 2010 and says the document “Seeks to revitalise the local railway industry by means of strategic policy interventions”.   Not only is freight rail included in the proposals but long-distance rail passenger and localised commuter services.

Road dominates at a cost

Minister Peters said in a media statement at the time that railways in South Africa had operated for almost more than a century without a proper overarching policy framework to guide development.   “The railway line and its railway stations have played a pivotal role in the day-to-day lives of communities, especially those in the rural areas, but as far as freight is concerned, 89% of freight is still transported by road and the future of commuter rail conducted on an ad hoc basis”.

roadsThe emphasis of road transport is costing the country millions of rands annually in road maintenance, money that could have been well spent on developing freight rail, she said.

The process

Cabinet last month approved the release of the Green Paper for public consultation. When all is finished, a final White Paper on National Rail Policy will be released to guide and direct development of infrastructure and develop more modern commuter systems. A National Rail Act will be the final result of the White Paper.

These interventions, according to Minister Peters, will reposition both passenger and freight rail for inherent competitiveness by “exploiting rail’s genetic technologies to increase axle load, speed, and train length.“

Lining things up

railway lineWider-gauge technologies are on the cards.   The government has said it is converting 20 000km of track to standard gauge from the narrower Cape gauge. This would bring the network in line with an African Union resolution on the subject and at the same time would boost capacity of goods carried, with longer trains and a reduction in transportation costs.

With both passenger and freight rail falling within its scope, part of the envisaged national transport policy includes involvement by the department of transport (DOT) in the local government sphere to create capabilities to move more passengers by rail with infrastructure, more rail line and technical assistance.

Creating local commuter rail

Secondly, once the localised capacity is in place, DOT says it will be able to appropriate subsidies for urban commuter rail, the management of the mini-systems then being devolved to municipalities themselves.

The Green Paper talks of investment and funding, private sector participation, inter-connection with the sub-Continent, skills planning, investment strategies and the start of a regulatory system.     Part of the master plan at operations level would include a branch line strategy with the private sector involved to improve connection between cities with towns and industrial areas.

Other articles in this category or as background

Transnet improves on road to rail switch – ParlyReportSA

South Africa remains without rail plan – ParlyReportSA

Minister comments on taxi and rail plans – ParlyReportSA

PRASA gets its rail commuter plan started – ParlyReport

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Draft Copyright Bill raises queries

Copyright Bill gives fees to State…

Sent to clients 6 October….

theatreAnomalies abound in the draft Copyright Amendment Bill, recently published for comment and now awaiting tabling in Parliament, hopefully with a number of changes say experts in the intellectual property industry.

The Bill primarily affects music, artistic and literary copyrights but the whole issue of patents, copyright and intellectual property rights are so intertwined that any changes will undoubtedly send up red flags up in various areas.

Government says in this instance it is trying to modernise the existing Copyright Act but as with any changes to established procedures that have existed for years, there are pros and cons that come with change it seems.

50 years after death

The draft Bill deals primarily with copyright of artistic, musical and literary work and most assume that works of great composers such Brahms, Beethoven and Schubert are free of copyright, those geniuses having long since passed away. In fact under the existing Act, the author, composer or artist has copyright for life and then fifty years

The draft states both clearly and unambiguously that the ownership of all copyright held by individuals will automatically transfer to the state upon their death.

Until death do us part….

There is not the slightest indication of what body or entity is involved, other than the fact that the Bill is to be tabled by the Minister of Trade and Industry, meaning that DTI, or an entity controlled by it, would receive such, presumably the individual’s Estate being responsible for notifying DTI that they are heirs. The draft also states that government may never re-sell or pass on such copyrights.

dti-logoThe question to any casual observer is what happens to this money, at present collect by such bodies in doubtful manner by such bodies as SAMRO and passed to DTI? It is revenue and does it go to National Treasury, perhaps a fund for aged musicians, authors and artists even child education in the arts? On this the Bill is silent, no policy having been ever stated by any cabinet minister on such matters.

Another tribunal

In the absence of any new guides as promised on intellectual property in general, such having been promised by DTI in the form of a National IP Policy many months ago, more concerning is the establishment of an Intellectual Property Tribunal which is a case of “overkill” in dealing with this limited area of copyright and royalties.

Such a body may adjudicate on “on any application and on any legislation brought before it”, the draft states.

On the whole, we have to assume that the majority of the draft Bill applies to individuals only, with the exception of the recording industry and literary reproduction industry, there also being certain clauses regarding End User Licence Agreements affecting software sales.

Criminalisation

copyright graphicOf concern though to many is the growing tendency to introduce criminalisation into legislation such as areas of BEE with fines normally reserved for more serious and harmful criminal police offences. In this case DTI have once again mentioned maximum jail and penalties of totally disproportionate periods and amounts.

To many, this Bill appears to have a lot more written in between the lines and prompts again many questions as to the direction DTI is taking with regard to international agreements, in this case the Agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights.

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25.1% is maximum BEE control, says DTI

DTI upbeat on implementation of BEE codes…..

lionel october 3

In a report to Parliament on the amended BEE Codes of Practice and their implementation as from 1 May 2015, Lionel October, Director General of Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and his B-BBEE staff team, emphasised that the generic scorecard was aligned to government’s key priorities. He also said the State had no ambitions to take their target on black control beyond 25.1% of ownership.

Supplier Development is new title

DG October said the main emphasis of the codes had now switched to greater emphasis on what was previously termed procurement – now referred to as “supplier development”. This approach was more in alignment with the National Development Plan (NDP) objectives, DG October said, simply because that was the main direction needed to empower the development of black enterprises and build the economy on a stable growth path.

“In fact the German auto industry working with the German Chamber of Commerce had established a fund

BMW-Werk Südafrika

in South Africa”, he said, “for financing, training and building expertise in black businesses to supply the auto industry”.

There was considerable discussion on this by members and DG October said that there had been a general recognition in business and industry of the word “must” had replaced “may” in terms of B-BBEE requirements; that level four had to be reached for incentives and in general now “certainty” had been restored to the business environment on BEE issues, he felt.

Five “Elements”

The generic scorecard now had five elements, he said, which all companies, except those micro-exempted, had to comply with for recognition. All employment equity and management control had now been merged into one of those elements, now termed “management control”.    Sector codes were now to be aligned by 1 Nov. 2015, as set out in Code 003.

He said that “in response to public submissions” the import exclusion principle would be maintained and that the definition of an “empowering supplier” in the context of code alignment was a compliant entity which could demonstrate that its production and/or value adding activities were taking place in this country.”

DTI said that that “deviations of sector codes in terms of targets must be over and above those of generic codes and companies that derive more than 50% of revenue from sectors where there is already a sector code must be measured in terms of that sector code.”

DTI has no doubtful intentions

George Washington, having cut down the cherry tree, with his fatherIn general, DG October said in response to questions from MPs about the amendments, it had been his impression that business seemed to accept there were no political mala fides on the part of DTI; just a wish to get on with the planned NDP growth path which required the co-operation of business and industry on black empowerment.

The funding of Sector Charter Councils was a “joint responsibility between government and the private sector and entities must report annually on their B-BBEE status to sector council who will in return reports to the BEE Commission”, DTI said.

New sectors in the sights

Sector codes were being considered for the tourism, which had reached the stage of gazetting for public comment; “alignment” was being reached in the construction, integrated transport, ICT, financial services and chartered accountancy sectors; the property and forestry sectors had reached gazetting stages and marketing, advertising and communication were with their appropriate ministries for approval.

DG October mentioned the fact that the manufacturing industry stood alone as there were so many different sectors but over a period, aspects would be dealt with such as the film industry and textile and clothing industry.

DTI concluded their input to the meeting by advising that a technical assistance guide to B-BBEE was in process and DTI were in the process of finalising the B-BBEE verification manual.

Recent faux pas

rob davies2Opposition members asked how it was that DTI went so wrong with the question of  downgrading the pointing system for employment schemes and why it was that the Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Rob Davies, had to retract that portion of the amendments which were not gazetted for public comment.

Chairperson Joan Fubbs intervened at this point, noting the Minister had taken the blame, had apologised for the mistake and could do no more than admit that DTI had been wrong.

DG October added that at a DTI workshop on the subject with “some stakeholders” this direction had been considered as a good option for broader rather than narrow empowerment but it had now been recognised by DTI that “they had gone down the wrong route as far as investor confidence was concerned”.

DTI had now reversed everything with the promise that this would not occur on the agenda again.

Better ideas could come

It had also been realised that such a move could also destroy imaginative plans for black management control such as that pitched by Standard Bank where 40% shareholding went to staff who could have representation on the board; 40% went to recognised BEE shareholders and 20% went into community organisations and trusts.

In answer to direct questioning by MPs, DG October confirmed that by the term “black”, DTI translatedlionel october this as African, Coloured, Indian and Chinese. He also confirmed that all these groups, if foreign and not South African citizens, were excluded.

More than 25.1% “unrealistic”

DG October, when asked by ANC MPs whether the 25.1% target for black ownership was realistic and fair considering that the demographics in South Africa demonstrated a far larger proportion of black people, he said that 25.1% could be considered as a “basic critical mass to engender a solid forward movement”.  To go any further would be unrealistic, he added.

In Malaysia, he said, local ownership was considered fair at 30% and other African countries as high as 50%, but he felt that in South Africa, where the need for the transfer of skills and training from large to small companies, especially through supplier development by state utilities and large businesses, was essential, this was a fair percentage assumption and which called for co-operation and fairness between all parties, all bearing in mind “a pretty hideous past”.

Redress of the past in all preambles

joan fubbsAt this point, Chairperson Joan Fubbs referred to the South African Constitution, reading out the clauses which not only stated that all were equal despite race colour or creed but that discrimination was possible if it was fair and she reminded MPs that redress of the past was “fair”.

She asked for all “not to isolate clauses in the Codes to determine personalised interests but get on with job of re-aligning communities that had been excluded from ownership for over 300 years”.

One ANC MP asked that the focus on big businesses be less emphasised and that DTI rather spent considerably more time with the job of developing ownership of black small business, which he stated could be “the power house of South Africa”.

He called for legislation that enforced government and public utilities, “as custodians of state power” to set an example on supplier development since, he said, one could hardly expect the private sector to follow suit, if the SOEs did not lead the way on this issue.

Incentives needed, not law says DTI

DG October said such sort of things were “impractical in the real world” and said the main challenge was a phased process of change which now had the support of many in positions of power in business. He also emphasised that B-BBEE had to tie in business and industry with incentives rather than with the law.

When asked about his recent public statement that he had set DTI’s target to produce “100 black industrialists”, he was referring rather to 100 black industrial leaders “financed and supported by DTI initiatives”.

Other articles in this category or as background
BEE comes under media scrutiny – ParlyReportSA
Rumblings in labour circles on BEE – ParlyReport
B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice far more onerous – ParlyReportSA
One year to implement B-BBEE Codes – ParlyReportSA

Posted in BEE, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

SARS understaffed to deal with transfer pricing

Davis report on transfer pricing confirms …

NB: This article updated after two recent meetings of committee on transfer pricing. Report with clients.

JudgeDennisDavisSouth African Revenue Service (SARS) was completely lacking in sufficient staff to deal effectively with transfer pricing in order to spot illegal transactions, said Judge Dennis Davis in his capacity as chairperson of the Tax Review Committee when addressing the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Mineral Resources.

He also pointed out that SARS, in any case, was also not provided with sufficient information by declaring companies, particularly multinationals as legislation stood at present, to further probe cross-border transactions to determine whether the movements involved the illicit transfer of profits from high-tax to low-tax regimes.

He told parliamentarians that whilst about three years ago SARS had conducted a very specific and targeted investigation, and had raised in one financial year alone some R1.1bn, this only illustrated the far larger amount of “haemorrhaging” that was taking place.

Not transfers but manipulation…

The Judge had to explain to MPs time and time again that transfer pricing in itself was not illegal, only any manipulative tax behaviour usually involving non-declaration or undervaluation.

Judge Dennis Davis referred to the recent highly publicised case involving HSBC where some R23bn directly involved the SA fiscus “and which was under review by SARS”.  He also drew attention to the fact that as a result of disclosures during the Marikana inquiry, Lonmin appeared to have profited by some R280m in saved taxes by transfers.

railfreight“Fictitious transfer pricing declarations were the problem”, he said, where multinationals managed to declare profits which appeared lower in countries with higher tax rates and higher in countries with lower tax rates. This occurred where the culprits identified transfers of intangibles for less than full value; showed over capitalisation of tax group companies and declared contractual arrangements with low risk tax environments.

Digging deeper

The Davis Tax Committee had recommended to National Treasury Department that the current unit in SARS, dedicated to base erosion and profit shifting be strengthened. At present this constituted only twenty personnel. “Building up this team would enable SARS to dig deeper into companies’ affairs”, he said.

Billy JoubertBilly Joubert, Tax Director, Deloittes, pointed to the fact that transfer pricing was in fact a “neutral” instrument in terms of its intention to promote industrialisation because its purpose was in fact to achieve arm’s length profits across the value chain.

Transfer pricing rules based on international best practice provided investors with certainty and it also protected the tax base of the relevant country, he said.   It was therefore an essential part of any tax system, providing taxpayers did not manipulate prices by shifting profits to lower tax jurisdictions. He condemned the practice.

Arm’s length reporting in question

Joubert said South Africa was an observer and an active contributor to the OECD and their transfer pricing guidelines was a resultant consensus document. It was critical for SA to align with the tax policies adopted by their trading partners where they could, endorse “the arm’s length principle” adopting the guidelines in their own domestic environment and follow global standards.

He said that SARS had achieved the collection of approximately R5bn over the last three years from some 30 audits and adjustments of R20bn.

He concluded that SARS’s new rules “were now more closely aligned to the global standard and possibly ahead of many other countries”, noting, however, there was a lack of certainty in terms of outdated practice notes; limited guidance on implementation of “secondary adjustment mechanisms”; and also a lack of interaction with double tax agreements which were closely allied to the process.

Back to understaffing…

Prof Johann Hattingh of UCT pointed to the fact that the Davis Tax Committee recommended full compulsory OECD style taxpayer information disclosure and there “was more than enough in the legislative armoury of SARS to effectively combat intercompany mispricing or tax abusive behaviour”.

However, he also pointed to the fact that SARS was understaffed and simply outnumbered by input of declarations to effectively implement transfer pricing legislation across a broad spectrum.

Prof Hattingh explained that insofar as tax interpretation was concerned it was a complex and ultimately subjective evaluation because of the difficulty in identifying intangibles and services which were transferred or provided and the arm’s length price at which they were valued. Even the whole definition of an “arms length transaction” was subject to difficult legal, accounting and tax interpretation, he pointed out.

OECD the genisis

He said all BRICS countries, except Brazil, took the OECD guidelines as a starting point, Brazil using fixed international commodity prices which provided more certainty but which conflicted in many cases with double tax agreements, since double tax could arise in one of the countries involved in transfers.

EFF member Freddie Shivambu said that in terms of SARS, staffing with skilled personnel was not the only problem as far as could see but there was a lack of clarity on the way forward.  Judge Davis replied that there were indeed criminal elements involved, such as illegal siphoning of money and under-declaration of assets, but his committee had established “empirical evidence” that the amount lost to the fiscus was not always as high as it was reported to be.

But the way forward, he re-empahsised, involved updating wording of legislation; the ability to follow up on “arms length transactions” and more staff to do this. His Committee’s report was with the President.

ANC says transfer pricing is manipulation

Some ANC members pointed to the fact that some multinationals were making “massive profits and not contributing to the country’s agenda to address poverty, inequality and unemployment and transformation” and that transfer pricing should be banned. Others called for it to be declared “illegal”.

They were corrected again by Judge Davis who explained that transfer pricing was a legitimate necessary process for companies doing legitimate transactions and as such it could not and would not be “banned” or illegalised.

D Macpherson DAMr D Macpherson (DA) joined the debate to say that the issue of illicit transfer pricing should not become a political matter but that it was a national concern for all, pointing to the fact that whilst transfer pricing was one issue, the country was losing some R6bn through other forms of corruption.

It was all part of the same problem, he said, and the country had to take a stand against all illicit activities that deliberately robbed the government of revenue.

Not just mining worldwide

Meanwhile Judge Davis agreed with ANC members that “additional revenue was needed to redress historical injustices” but the World Bank had reported that South Africa had addressed this challenge better than most countries, including Brazil. There was no evidence to suggest that transfer pricing affected the mining industry notably.

He was joined by Billy Joubert of Deloittes who stated that such a transaction should not be criminalised because they were cross-border transactions, which was essentially transfer pricing, and re-emphasised that they were “neutral” until  assessed and found to be illicit or not.

National Union of Mineworkers said transfer prices should in principle match either what the seller would charge an independent, arm’s length customer, or what the buyer would pay an independent, arm’s length supplier. He claimed that transfer pricing defeated the objectives of the Minerals and Petroleum Resources Development Act.

“All it meant”, said the NUM spokesperson, “was retrenchment of employees; low and unequal salaries: inadequate investment on skills development; poor implementation of social and labour plans and less investment on health and safety standards, resulting in injuries and fatalities.”

brigette radebeBridgette Radebe of South African Mining Development Association (SAMDA) said her records showed that “out of 151 countries, South Africa lost, on average, the twelfth highest amount of money through illicit financial outflows”. She disagreed with Joubert of Deloittes on the ‘neutrality’ of transfer pricing and the effects and that the statement that the mining industry was a “small player” was incorrect.

She said the mining industry contributed 17% of GDP and 38% of exports, plus 19% of private investment with R78 billion spent in wages and salaries. “These figures were totally eroded and made misleading by transfer pricing”, she said.  She provided the parliamentarians with a series of figures explaining how transfer pricing in the mining industry took place and claimed that manipulation was often the practice.

SAMDA suggested the immediate alignment of the mining charter with the B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice with transfer pricing and to address the issue of penalties contained in the charter for non-compliance.  Much agreement from ANC members took place.

Multinationals under attack

One ANC member stated that “the bulk of South Africa’s mineral resources were in the hands of foreign nationals and it was good that SAMDA and organised labour came together and addressed the issue of transfer pricing in terms of the South Africa’s economy.”

A department of mineral resources (DMR) staff member attending was called upon by the chair to respond, who stated that all the issues raised would be discussed by his department and in the light of success with penalties under the Mine and Safety Act, increased penalties for breeches in declarations might be considered.

Cooperation possible

DMR and SARS had been working together, the spokesperson said, on the whole issue of transfer pricing, a memorandum of understanding between the two departments having been established.

SAMDA said that some multinational companies often wished to “manipulate prices to such an extent that there was no income for beneficiation or share distribution and consequently loans on shares could not be repaid.”

Other articles in this category or as background
//parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/sars-to-be-given-right-to-search-without-warrant/
//parlyreportsa.co.za/securitypolicedefence-2/customs-duty-bill-cuts-inland-ports/
//parlyreportsa.co.za/finance-economic/promotion-and-protection-of-investment-bill-opens-major-row/
//parlyreportsa.co.za/finance-economic/financial-sector-regulation-bill-heralds-twin-peaks/

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