Archive | Fuel,oil,renewables

Chevron loses with Nersa on oil storage

 

Nersa appeal in favour of Burgan….

cape town harbourWhether Chevron would or would not close down its refinery in Cape Town was asked twice by MPs during a debate in the Portfolio Committee on Energy on the licence supplied by the National Energy Regulator (NERSA) for the construction of a new oil tank terminal to be constructed at Cape Town harbour.

The storage facility, comprising twelve tanks with loading facilities, is to be constructed next to the Eastern Mole berth by Burgan Cape Terminals, a subsidiary of international oil trading merchant Vitol in which local BEE companies, Thebe Investments and Jicaro Ltd., have a 30% stake.

Crompton says move “a ploy to ransom”

Dr Rod Crompton, NERSA’s Regulator, said he thought that such a move by Chevron as closing the rod cromptonrefinery was unlikely and the possibility, as stated by Chevron in their appeal, was just a ploy to “ransom” the government in denying Burgan the licence.”

There were some 13,000 jobs involved at Chevron and he said “I cannot see Chevron pulling out.”

Dr Crompton expanded on this by saying that Chevron’s objection had come at a particularly sensitive point in the oil industry’s history when possible government subsidies were being argued about, with refineries calling for help in a re-build programme to meet cleaner fuels specifications (CF2) in terms of international agreements signed by South Africa.

Dr Crompton said new vehicle engines were already being manufactured based in the new specifications and “the pressure was on”.

No pipeline from Cape Town

chevron CTHe said that Chevron had maintained in their appeal against the licence being granted to Burgan that they were situated in a province where production exceeded demand and Transnet had supplied no pipeline from Cape Town to the industrial heartland of South Africa.

This was in comparison to KzN, where the Transnet Durban/Gauteng pipeline ensured flow from Sapref (Shell and BP) processing some 24 000 tons crude per day and Enref (Engen) had a nameplate capacity of 135, 000 barrels per day, all of which was far in excess of the demands of their province.

Dr Crompton said that Chevron was asking for a dispensation which no other refiner enjoyed, whereas in fact in Durban the two refineries competed with each other.

Not impressed

Present  in the audience seating at the meeting were Nobuzwe Mbuyisa, Chairperson of Chevron and various other Chevron executives. They remained impassive throughout the NERSA presentation.

NERSA had noted, Dr Crompton said, that South Africa generally was in need of storage capacity and NERSA had only licensed in the Cape Town area three facilities for petrol and diesel and only one of these allocated any storage for third parties. A total national storage figure of 1.7% was only available in fact, he said, to third parties throughout the country.

Burgan says no supply security

NERSA said that on the question of loading facilities, Burgan had pointed out to NERSA that there waschevron tank no security of supply for the area, since Chevron owned the only facilities, although Chevron had argued, Dr Crompton said, that it had spare capacity. But this was not the case at all, he said.

Dr Crompton said NERSA had decided that in the light of the fact that a study had shown that South Africa’s refineries in general were ageing; that Chevron’s port infrastructure had constraints in the context of growth and there was limited access to third party storage, especially new BEE entrants and that that truck discharge rates were the key bottleneck and not as either party stated, that a licence for storage as well as discharge facilities should be granted to Burgan.

Why come to Parliament?

All MPs from both parties complained that whilst the dissertation had been interesting, as the decision had already been made by NERSA why they asked was the Committee’s time being wasted when the matter that was already a fact.  Dr Crompton replied that NERSA had been invited by Parliament to expand on the security of supply issue at the invitation of a Parliamentary Study Group on the subject.

gordon mackay DAGordon Mackay, Shadow Minister of Energy, said that security of supply was a matter for the Department of Energy not NERSA but he warned that Vito were large merchant traders and that the storage facilities were well off normal oil trading sea routes.

The oil game

The tanks, he warned, could very well be used by Burgan for dumping in a game of oil price manipulation, as Burgan were traders not refiners and product suppliers but time would tell.

Dr Crompton dismissed such a suggestion out of hand.

Other articles in this category or as background
South Africa still off the hook on Iranian oil
Fuel price controlled by seasonal US supply – ParlyReportSA
CEF hurt by Mossel Bay losses – ParlyReportSA

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Budget vote speeches: Out of touch with each other

Editorial….

DTI does flip flop on B-BBEE pointing…..

elephant and bayThere have clearly been were two big elephants in the room during budget vote speech time in the National Assembly over the last two weeks – Eskom and BEE.    Then, suddenly, with DTI reversing their decision to reduce B-BEE pointing award benefits for broad-based employment schemes – one of the elephants disappeared.  It was an amazing flip flop in government policy.

But in actual fact this represents no change, in reality – just simply the fact that the whole structure of what was proposed was seen by all as impractical, unenforceable and to industry, unacceptable.

Backstage dramas

Whether it was business and industry pressure that forced the change, the Chamber of Mines or even the trade union movement itself, after two surprising gazettes announcing reduced awards in terms of black empowerment for broad based shareholder schemes, including employee schemes so carefully Rob+Daviesworked out in the last two years, and the second gazette correcting the fact that such changes were not retrospective, what happened behind the scenes will never be known. We think it was minister Rob Davies himself who put his foot down.

In a private comment, when sympathising with the minister for having to reverse his department’s announcements so publicly, his answer was “When something goes wrong you have to put it right.”  We admire for that and told him so.

Energy issues remain at the core

As far as the first elephant in the room, the energy crisis, it remains.    Unusually, this year despite all the speeches, the amount of media briefings and portfolio committee debates, including the millions of rands spent on airfares with some forty odd departments and SOEs fielding full teams reporting, it was only the minister of energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson, who really tackled electricity and the issue of Eskom – all the other ministers appearing avoiding the issue like the plague, even public enterprises.

Correcting the past

What indeed was noticeable, at portfolio committee level as well, that each reporting team and each minister seemed to be more anxious to report on transformation and state ownership issues, as if some very clear dictate had been received that the ANC was not delivering on its election mandate in these areas and this was really the main priority.

Whilst lip service seems to have been paid, and then only in some instances, to the need for foreign investment and issues of the country’s rating image, the lacklustre address by the minister of trade and industry gave only more credence to the belief that redress for past injustices was the only big elephant in their lives and in Union Buildings.

Transformation not economics at forefront

In the committees, where all departments have been reporting on progress towards annual targets, this now being the last quarter, the most important slide in any PowerPoint presentation (following clarity on the audit process) was always the racial makeup of the department concerned in terms of reaching transformation targets and what race ratios currently existed. The theme was obvious.

We have listened to many thousands of words spoken over the month and more is yet to come as we write, but it is all too evident that there is a massive discord between business and industry and President Zuma’s cabinet on priorities.

Final word

Trade and industry minister, Rob Davies, warned parliamentarians in his budget vote speech, when mentioning BEE matters , that members should  be aware that the President had indicated that the central task was to bring about radical economic transformation.      Which really said it all.

Posted in BEE, cabinet, Cabinet,Presidential, earlier editorials, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Fuel price controlled by seasonal US supply

US refinery shut downs affect fuel price…..

US refineryThe current spike in the price of petrol is due of a number of international issues  compounding together but the primary cause is that at this time of year in the United States, a number of major US refineries close down for maintenance in order to prepare for the US summer surge in fuel sales.

This was said by Dr Wolsey Barnard, acting DG of the department of energy (DoE), when he introduced a briefing to the portfolio committee on energy on its strategy for the coming year.

In actual fact, the meeting had been called to debate the promised “5-point energy plan” from the cabinet’s “war room” which did not eventualise, the minister of energy also being absent for the presentation as scheduled. It appeared that the DoE presentation had been hastily put together.

“Price swingers” make perfect storm

Dr Wolsey BarnardDr Barnard said that it could be expected that the price of fuel would be extremely volatile in the coming months due in main “geo-political events” affecting the price of oil, local pricing issues of fuel products and possibly even sea lane interruptions. Price would always be based on import parity and current events in Mexico, Venezuela and the Middle East would always be “price swingers”, he said.

On electricity matters, his speciality, he avoided any reference to past lack of investment in infrastructure, but said that he called for caution in the media, by government officials and the committee on the use of the two expressions “blackouts” and “load shedding”.

Same old story

“Over the next two years”, he said, “until sufficient infrastructure was in place, there would have to be planned maintenance in South Africa” and referred to the situation in the US as far as maintenance of refinery plant was concerned. He said that also “unexpected isolated problems” could also arise with ageing generation installations, during which planned “load shedding” would have to take place.

He said he could not imagine there being a “blackout”.

Opposition members complained that the whole electricity crisis could be solved if some companies would cease importing raw minerals, using South African electricity at discounted prices well below the general consuming manufacturing industry paid, and re-exporting smelted aluminium back to the same customer. They accused DoE of trying to “normalise what was a totally abnormal position for a country to be in.”

Billiton back in contention

One MP said, “Industry was in some cases just using cheap South African electricity to make a profit”. Suchaluminium smelter practices went against South Africa’s own beneficiation programme, he said, in the light of the raw material being imported and the finished product re-exported. “It would be cheaper to shut down company and pay the fines”, the DA opposition member added, naming BH Billiton as the offender in his view.

Dr Barnard said DoE could not discuss Eskom’s special pricing agreements which were outside DoE’s control  and “which were a thing of the past and a matter which we seem to be stuck with for the moment.”

High solar installation costs

Dr Barnard also said that DoE had established that the department had to be “cautious on the implementation of solar energy plan” as a substitute energy resource in poorer, rural areas and even some of the lower income municipal areas.  DoE, he said, “had to find a different funding model”, since the cost of installation and maintenance were beyond the purse of most low income groups.

In general, he promised more financial oversight on DoE state owned enterprises and better communications.   There were plenty of good news stories, he said, but South Africa was hypnotising itself into a position of “bad news” on so many issues, including energy matters. He refused to discuss any matters regarding PetroSA, saying this was not the correct forum nor was it on the agenda.

Still out there checking

On petroleum and products regulation, the DG of that department, Tseliso Maquebela, said that non-compliance in the sale of products still remained a major issue. “We have detected a few cases of fraudulent fuel mixes”, he said, “but we plan to double up on inspectors in the coming months, especially in the rural areas, putting pressure on those who exploit the consumer.” The objective, he said was reach a target of a 90% crackdown on such cases with enforcement notices.

Maquebela added that on BEE factors, 40% of licence applications with that had 50% BEE compliance was now the target.

Competition would be good

On local fuel pricing regulations, Maquebela said “he would dearly like to move towards a more open and competitive pricing policy introducing more competition and less regulations.”

fuel tanker engenOn complaints that the new fuel pipeline between Gauteng and Durban was still not in full production after much waiting, Maquebela said the pipeline was operating well but it was taking longer than expected to bring about the complicated issue of pumping through so many different types of fuel down through the same pipeline. “But we are experts at it and it will happen”, he said.

Fracking hits the paper work

On gas, particularly fracking, DoE said that the regulations “were going to take some time in view of all the stakeholder issues”.

On clean energy and “renewables” from IPP sources, DoE stated that the “REIPP” was still “on track” but an announcement was awaited from the minister who presumably was consulting with other cabinet portfolios regarding implementation of the fourth round of applications from independent producers.

Opposition totally unimpressed

In conclusion, DA member and shadow minister of energy, Gordon McKay, said that the DoEgordon mackay DA presentation was the most “underwhelming” he had ever listened to on energy.   Even the ANC chair, Fikile Majola, sided with the opposition and said that DoE  “can do better than this.”

He asked how Parliament could possibly exercise oversight with this paucity of information.   DoE representatives looked uncomfortable during most of the presentations and under questioning it was quite clear that communications between cabinet and the DoE were poor.

When asked by members who the new director general of the department of energy would be and why was the minister taking so long to make any announcement on this, Dr Wolsey Barnard, as acting DG, evaded the question by answering that “all would be answered in good time”.

Other articles in this category or as background
Energy gets war room status – ParlyReportSA
Medupi is key to short term energy crisis – ParlyReportSA
Integrated energy plan (IEP) around the corner – ParlyReportSAenergy legislation is lined up for two years – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Electricity, Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Eskom goes to the brink with energy

Editorial…..

What war room?….

black bulbFor those who have been associated with a war, they will know that a war room is a pretty busy place. However, one gets the impression that the South African war room, mandated to sort out Eskom and energy planning, has no red telephone and little understanding of working overtime in a time of crisis.

Spokesperson, Mac Maharaj or his  replacement, has certainly issued no statements headed with such a title, the President being busy visiting Egypt, Algeria and Angola with the deputy president calling in on the Kingdom of Lesotho.  President Mugabe has come and gone, more presidential visits are planned…… and the World Bank report on South Africa has been published.

Teetering on the edge

Meanwhile, the Eskom issue is still boiling over, the question of the fourth round of IPP tenders and more to come has been announced by the minister of energy but little evidence exists that a war room exists, let alone a high powered advisory council to advise the war room.  Parliament was, of course, on Easter recess which added to the uncanny political silence on urgent matters, particularly the energy issue, although the story at Medupi with a return to work and the appointment of a new CEO at Eskom seems  calming.

At last public servants are re-appearing from extended Easter holidays but the so-called war room gives the impression of having bunkered down. Hopefully the report in the coming weeks on Eskom, as South Africa tackles some of the other serious matters facing the country, will not only show with what went wrong but what the war room intends to do about it.

Perhaps a picture of the war room sitting and debating might actually help us believe there is one.

Posted in cabinet, earlier editorials, Electricity, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn0 Comments

Grand Inga hydro power possible

DRC clean energy destined for SA….

drc flagOpposition members of the parliamentary energy committee expressed a certain level of cynicism regarding the Grand Inga project treaty signed recently between South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the subject of which is a multi-phased hydro power station to be built on the Congo River.

They noted that the DRC is ranked second only to Somalia as the worst country on a worldwide index of failed states    However, despite this reservation, MPs in general noted that on the whole the project had “exciting possibilities”, albeit long term ones.

These points were made during a presentation by the department of energy (DoE) on the Inga treaty recently signed by President Zuma.   Inga 1 and Inga 2 dams are already in operation, supplying low output power. The issue of a hydro power link with the DRC has been “on the table” for some fifteen years.

Congo River cusec power

The new third Inga dam, which will be by far the largest and hence the title “grand” for the whole project. The project will be approximately 250 kms from the capital Kinshasa and 50kms from Africa’s West coast, the Congo River having the second largest and strongest flow after the Amazon, mainly as a result of the dams being sited after one of the largest waterfalls in the world. However, the Congo has by no means the longest and largest drainage area.

DoE said in response to the statement that the DRC was a failed state that whilst it recognised that the DRC had been unstable for years, especially in the North Eastern Region, most of the trouble was more than 200km from the Inga site and even when the civil war at its height, there had never been any interruption of power services.

The Grand Inga project, said DOE in quoting the developers, would be able to supply some 40,000MW in clean energy when all seven phases were completed for development in Central, East and Southern Africa.

SA power line to local grid

It is foreseen that new transmission line to South Africa necessary will be associated with the first phase of the project and which would probably traverse Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana.   It is estimated that the first phase will cost some R140bn at current prices.

The meeting in question was attended by the deputy minister of energy, Thembisile Majola, and DoE represented by Ompi Aphane, DDG: policy, planning and clean energy, DoE, who indicated that the treaty provided for the establishment of an Inga Development Authority (ADEPI). There would also be a joint ministerial committee drawn from the two signatory countries and a joint and permanent technical committee to facilitate the project.

Earlier failures

The deputy minister said that the new treaty had at last put behind the failed Westcor project, involving Billiton and essentially a SADC body involving SA, Angola, Botswana, the Congo and Namibia with the DRC as lead.

In 2010, the DRC announced it was pulling out of the arrangement and would develop the Inga dam complex on its own, which move collapsed the Westcor consortium. However, despite much wasted time and effort, Aphane said a good deal of the feasibility work had been completed.

Minister Majola said that what had been learnt from Westcor was that any future proposition had to be on a win/win basis for each participant in order to avoid such a collapse.    It was now recognised that the DRC had to meet its own requirements first as a basis for any project to succeed as a consortium, the minister added.

Getting in first

An MOU with the DRC was subsequently signed on this basis in 2011 and the current treaty provides not only a potential to generate the stated 40 000 MW after its seven phases but to provide relatively cheap, clean energy at any point, of which RSA has secured rights to import 12 000MW.

Ompi Aphane explained that in return DRC have agreed to grant SA the right of first refusal (ROFR) for both equity and off-take in respect of any and all future phases of the project or any related hydro-electric development of the Congo River in and around the Inga complex.

Once RSA is “locked in” to phase one and proceeds with implementation, it is committed to take 2500 MW as an off take.

SA gets lowest terms

US$ 10m is payable by SA in terms of the treaty into an escrow account as commitment fee in terms of the ROFR.    Aphane said that SA will be charged the lowest possible tariff and no other off-taker will be able to receive better terms than SA.

He continued, “DRC are to ensure that for each phase of the project, the developer company will reserve at least 15 per cent of the available equity to SA and South African entities, public or private, and SA shall be the first to be offered such share capital.”

Aphane said the “designated delivery point” will be at Kolwezi, about 150 km from the DRC/Zambia border and SA will be responsible for the 150 km line needed.   The DRC will either provide a concession to enable SA to construct and operate that portion of the line to the Zambian border, or commit to develop it themselves.   One of the DRC’s most obvious priorities was the supply of power to Kinshasa and Zambia’s “copperbelt”.

Parliament to approve

DoE concluded their presentation by telling MPs that the treaty would be introduced to Parliament for ratification in due course and negotiations on the outstanding protocols on tariff setting also needed to be finalised.    On a critical path plan were also negotiations with transit countries and a final feasibility study on the direction that the transmission line would take.

Ompi Aphane, in responding to a number of MPs questions, said that on environmental issues, which were in article 14 of the treaty, carbon credit matters has been taken into consideration and more would be heard on this.

SA not involved in dam

On the critical issue of finance, Ompi Aphane said that MPs should realize that other than the possibility of transmission lines, SA was not involved in dam construction and the country would be paying for power on connection, plus in all probability building a transmission line to connect to the SA grid.   Consequently there were no major debt issues arising at present.

Ntsiki Mashimbye, SA’s ambassador to the DRC, was present at the meeting and commented that the Grand Inga project “was not a project in isolation, not even just about electricity, but about industrializing Africa as a whole.”

The minister concluded by commenting that the integration of the African continent was the target as well as providing clean energy sustainability for South Africa and all the benefits that would ensue, including resale to other nations.
Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/grand-inga-hydroelectric-power-getting-under-way-at-last/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/integrated-energy-plan-iep-around-corner/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/doe-talks-biofuels-and-biomass/

Posted in Electricity, Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Land,Agriculture, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Energy gets war room status

Cabinet creates energy crisis committee…..

Editorial…….

eskom logoIn retrospect, for the cabinet having had to resort to establishing an energy war room is probably a good thing inasmuch that a meeting of minds appears to have taken place at all levels of the ANC Alliance on energy matters. The situation is indeed serious.

The message from business and industry that the “energy crunch” is not only immensely threatening to the economy appears to have got through, accompanied probably by the realisation that so many regular failures, power or otherwise, are threatening to the ability of the ANC to stay in power.

Foggy outlook

Perceived at first as an issue mainly affecting the rural poor, the failure of Eskom to deliver on most of its promises; the bumbling of the department of energy on independent power producer parameters and the to-ing and fro-ing of cabinet on the adoption of nuclear energy into the energy mix, has been somewhat of a pantomime.

For months we have been reporting from Parliament on the ambivalence of Eskom and the reluctance of the department of energy and public enterprises to chart a course on energy.

The whole truth…

NA with carsHowever, what is a matter of concern is the fact that in all those lengthy power point presentations and detailed reports to parliamentary committees that we have witnessed or read, the ball has been completely dropped on the energy issue and badly so.   At the very least Parliament were not given the full facts, particularly in the case of Eskom, thus threatening the parliamentary oversight process.

Deputy President Ramaphosa has now been designated to oversee the turnaround of SAA, SAPO and Eskom. The cabinet statement says regarding this, “Working with the relevant ministries, SAA will be transferred from the department of public enterprises to national treasury. The presidency will closely monitor the implementation of the turnaround plans of these three critical SOCs that are drivers of the economy.”

Maybe next year

It is comforting therefore to some extent to know that such a “war office” has been established and that cabinet has adopted a five-point plan to address the electricity challenges facing the country but it just seems incorrect that a relatively empty, tired statement such as “more cross cutting meetings to meet the challenges facing  the country will be adopted” was all that could be added in the form of action before ministers disappeared for the Christmas recess, including, we understand, the contractor’s staff at Medupi.

elec gridIt seems that nobody is in charge over the same period nor interested enough to be there and nobody is really looking much beyond January 15, when South Africa starts switching on again.

 

Perhaps in 2015, some reality will return to South African politics and amongst the governing party. They may learn that there is a direct relationship between being in power and keeping the power on and we foresee many more direct confrontations on this issue and others in Parliament during the coming year.

 

 

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CEF hurt by Mossel Bay losses

CEF R3.4bn write down was “irregular” …..

PetroSA logoLosses incurred at the Central Energy Fund (CEF) gas to liquid facility at Mossel Bay operated by PetroSA have resulted in a revaluation of assets based on the expected life of the refinery but the impairment that resulted, to the tune of R3.4bn, was found to be “irregular” by the office of the auditor general (AG) when reviewing the CEF 2013/4 results.

CEO of CEF, Siswe Mncwango, appeared before the portfolio committee on energy together with the chief executives of subsidiaries PetroSA, iGas, the Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF), African Exploration and Mining (AE) and the licensing and regulatory petroleum body, PASA, to brief the committee on their annual report and to justify their financial performance in terms of the AG findings for the group.

PetroSA struggling

The key issue central to the impairment of R3.4bn, Mncwango said, was the necessity for subsidiary PetroSA, in terms of its mandate, to maintain its levels of gas feedstock at a sufficient level to meet strategic stock policy in the national interest.  It was necessary, he said, to undertake this accounting process in view of delays experienced in exploiting undersea gas fields.

He said, the plant started operating at Mossel Bay in 1992, the life of plant being estimated at 15 years, and then known as Mossgas. With the project not having the necessary funding for exploration at sea during its early years, the plant consequently became threatened far too early in its planned operating life.

Limited choices

CEF faced two financially driven options, Mncwango explained to parliamentarians.  There was a choice between running the plant at 50% capacity or to close it down, he said.  As the strategic need for gas feedstock was an imperative facing both CEF and PetroSA, it was decided to further explore the existing and nearby gas field area.

Project Ikhwezi was thus born but at this stage expensive drilling to greater depths and lateral drives have been encountered and with newly pioneered methods, this has resulted in major additional costs. However, PetroSA, in a briefing from their engineering head on the subject drilling expectations, indicated that they are confident that plentiful gas supplies are on the cards.

Long time drilling

The project involves tapping into gas reserves in Petro SA’s F-O field which is located 40km south-east of the production platform off the south coast of South Africa.  The first well drilled was finalised in 2013 and the final link between all wells is to be completed during 2014/2015, parliamentarians were told.

The delays that have been experienced have also negatively affected the finances of PetroSA, CEF said, and this had necessitated permission for a temporary impairment from national treasury. However, this was not certificated correctly according to the AG’s report and consequently the R3.4bn impairment became “irregular”.

Difficult waters

According to Andrew Dippenaar, PetroSA’s upstream acting vice-president, Project Ikhwezi may, and probably will, be producing in some eighteen months. The riskiness and speed necessary in trying to find gas in difficult waters has added to the problems, he said, on top of which the gas field is geologically problematic.

This has led to operating losses at refinery level with a result that some sort of accounting write off was necessary in the short term, despite this hurting PetroSA’s current cash reserves of R5.5bn. This amount will not be recoverable, CEF’s financial officer said but he was adamant that this was not a cash loss affecting the taxpayer, more a book entry. CEO Mncwango added that inherited delays in finding gas at sea in the immediate area close to the landing facilities had resulted in the current situation. These were many risks in oil and gas exploration, he said.

Chief financial officer of PetroSA, Lindiwe Bakoro, was insistent that as a result of long delays in exploration any hope of immediate profits might be delayed but long term viability had been planned for and this was expected.  Consequently, new valuations on assets were undertaken to re-gear the project with treasury permission.  However, Bakoro confirmed that PetroSA would await the final results of drilling and connection before any final write down-decision on the impairment took place.

Purchasing procedures

On other irregular expenditure items, totalling some R30m, that appeared in the CEF results noted by the AG, these again were for PetroSA.   Such were mainly as a result of the correct procedures not having been followed in terms of procurement procedure. 

The correct procedures were now followed throughout the CEF group, Mncwango said, and the AG had been satisfied on this subject, since the annual report had not been qualified. A specific “irregular” figure of R1.6bn was also reported for PetroSA in respect of its Ghana operations.

Again it was explained that this was a procedural and the necessary documentation on transfer of monies had been incorrectly processed.   It would appear that treasury permission had been applied for and granted in 2013 but the actual transfer of R1.6bn had taken place in 2014, a different financial year for the record. CEF reported that PetroSA, nevertheless, had shown a particularly good return for the first time on its Ghanaian liquid fuels investment, returning a profit for 2013/4 of some R560m

On or off. Who knows?

Asked if any discussions with Engen on downstream development in the name of PetroSA had progressed, CEF’s Mncwango said that any such discussions were confidential and he would not be drawn into further explanations since these were commercially sensitive, whether with Engen or any other body in the liquid fuels sector.

Ms. Nosizwe Nokwe-Macamo, CEO of PetroSA, concluded that steps were taken to effectively manage fruitless, wasteful and irregular expenditure and that the focus for the national fuels group in the period ahead included delivery on Project Ikhwezi and finalising funding arrangements for “downstream entry”.

Gas plan on the way

The meeting was attended by the deputy minister of energy, who said she was confident that steps taken by both CEF and PetroSA were in the interests of the national strategy on gas supplies and that cabinet were shortly to debate the gas utilization master plan (GUMP). This was in response to opposition members who had complained to the minister that South Africa’s liquid fuels and energy plans could not be finalised until the state’s future gas supply scenario was properly clarified.

Other articles in this category or as background

http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/petrosa-has-high-hopes-with-the-chinese/ http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/cef-still-has-its-troubles/ http://parlyreportsa.co.za/uncategorized/central-energy-fund-slowly-gets-its-house-in-order/

Posted in Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Eskom crosses its fingers

Medupi:  Eskom on final run ….

eskomCollin Matjila, interim CEO of Eskom, told a joint parliamentary portfolio committee on energy and public enterprises that Eskom had learned a number of lessons in the building of coal-based power stations, probably the most important being the need for a suitably qualified and capacitated contractor oversight team to handle the complexity and extent of any project such as the construction of Medupi.

Although power from the new plant was to be introduced to the grid this Christmas Eve from Medupi, and incrementally more onwards, full power would only be happening at stable levels by winter 2015.

With both the boiler contractor and control and instrumentation contractor problems causing delays and a strike affecting between 40% -70% of the workforce, the 6-month delay had been recognised by both treasury and cabinet in financial re-calculations.

Minister notes….

Also addressing the committee, public enterprises minister, Lynne Brown, stressed that in her view “the corner had been turned at Medupi”.  She said that cabinet had approved a package to “support a strong and sustainable Eskom to ensure energy security”.   The inter-ministerial committee, which was comprised of finance, public enterprises and cooperative governance and traditional affairs, had now reviewed all options before them both on electricity and energy generally.

Eskom then stated that the second unit, Kusile would be added to the grid in a start-up process in the first half of 2015 and Ingula, the third and smaller hydro unit, in the second half of 2015.

No rest with summer

Matjila cautioned MPs that additional capacity would be needed during summer this year, despite any reduced seasonal demand.   This was because of the need to accommodate “planned” outages, which were set to take up 10% of full capacity being supplied.

By referring to full capacity, this was a theoretical maximum availability, Matjila said, subject to the reality of unplanned outages.  Eskom warned of a possible inability to meet demand throughout the remainder of the financial year, as distinct from seasonal timing, if it should be financially restrained in its use of it expensive-to-run standby open-cycle gas-turbines.

More price increases

Recovery of unbudgeted costs in this area for the year under review were part of the problem facing Eskom, Matjila said, and the recent announcement by the national electricity regulator, Nersa, of a rise of just short of 13% in electricity prices in April 2015 was no doubt motivated by this factor amongst others.

However, he said, Eskom may also have to deal with a higher maintenance in December, including half station shutdowns for three stations. He qualified this in a later Engineering News report which stated that 32 of Eskom’s 87 coal-fired generating units required “major surgery”, whilst four were in a “critical condition”.   November was also critical, he said, if all did not go as planned.

Despite continued questioning by parliamentarians on the state of progress at the second “New Build” power station, Kusile, no specific answers were provided by either Eskom or the minister other than the fact that Kusile had experienced “protected” and “unprotected” strikes in contractor workforces during the year.

Strikes

Matjila stressed that the workforce was back on site at both locations. “Additional resources had been mobilised to mitigate delays, he said, and additional shifts have been introduced 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to accelerate progress on site.  Eskom was liaising with contractors to deal with any issues which had the potential of causing further delays, he said.

In his overall concluding remarks, Matjila said a five-point recovery plan had been introduced to improve the performance of the Eskom coal-fired fleet, with the utility having reaffirmed its objective of “returning to an 80-10-10 operating model, which implied 80% plant availability, 10% planned outages and 10% unplanned events across a period of a year.”

Outside inputs

On the situation with regard to the independent power producers (IPP) programme, Matjila said he was aware that the department of energy (DoE) had processed  over one thousand applications during the three IPP 3-stage bidding process and this had stretched DoE resources considerably.

He said it had been a complicated process to secure sustainable competitive prices in respect of the particular technologies involved. What had to be also factored in was the burden of hidden costs of storage and back-up which had to be borne by Eskom, not the IPPs.

Also the proximity and availability of energy supplies on the supply in providing the “appropriate infrastructure” was being dealt with and overcome.

It was important, Matjila said in conclusion, for Eskom to ensure that potential and online suppliers met grid code requirements and he was aware that some IPPs were struggling with this process.
Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/medupi-key-short-term-energy-crisis/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/cabinetpresidential/eskom-says-medupi-and-kusile-will-have-great-local-benefits/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/eskom-warns-on-costs-of-new-air-quality-rules/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/energy/dpe-reports-on-eskom-and-it-utilities-to-parliament/

Posted in Electricity, Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, Land,Agriculture, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Karoo Fracking

Fracking, shale gas gets nearer

Mineral resources gives update on fracking, shale gas

In what appeared to be justification for cabinet’s support of the furtherance of shale gas exploration, director general of the department of mineral resources (DMR), Thibedi Ramontja, told Parliament recently that the discovery of gas deposits in the Karoo “was an exciting opportunity to create jobs and that this was going to make a difference to people’s lives in terms of the NDP”.

He was briefing the select committee on land and mineral resources on the department’s budget vote, his audience representing a different cluster and a more inclusive one than when DMR briefed the National Assembly’s portfolio committee the week before.

Whilst a gazette had been published in February 2014 imposing certain restrictions on the granting of new applications for shale gas “reconnaissance”, DMR said that current approvals did not yet authorise hydraulic fracturing itself.     If this was allowed, “certain amendments” would be made to the appropriate Act.

EIA to come

An environmental impact assessment would be completed in conjunction with the department of water affairs “within the second quarter of 2014/5” to determine “responsible practices” for hydraulic fracturing and to “provide a platform of engagement with stakeholders”.   DMR said that this process would be “streamlined”.

It was noted by DMR in their presentation to parliamentarians that both shale gas exploration and production, together with coal bed methane, will be authorised under environmental impact regulations.

Warning on BEE

The briefing on the DMR strategic plan for five years and this year’s budget vote for the department was preceded by a statement by the deputy minister of mineral resources. Again the warning was conveyed to the mining and petroleum industry that it was generally in default of the mining charter.

With the tenth anniversary of the charter now present, DG Ramontja said, findings by DMR indicated that whilst some targets had been partially achieved in terms of BEE and the charter, others were very much lagging. “Action will be taken”, she said.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/shale-gas-exploration-gets-underway/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/move-by-minister-to-qualify-shale-gas-exploration
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/fracking-regulations-enhance-safety/

Posted in BEE, Electricity, Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Competition Commission turns to LP gas market

Focus may be on LP gas allocations….

LP gasThe Competition Commission has announced that it will conduct a market inquiry into the state of competition in the LP gas sector.    Public comment is invited from those in the liquified gas petroleum (LPG) sector and the Commission has said that such an inquiry is being initiated because it has reason to believe that there may be features of the sector that prevent, distort or restrict competition.

In its announcement the Commission specifically draws attention to the fact there are six refineries in the country, namely – Sapref, Sasol Synfuels, PetroSA Synfuels, Natref, Enref and Chevref.

Of these, the Commission says, “Only two allocate a certain proportion of their total LPG supply to wholesalers, which may have an impact on competitive dynamics in the downstream wholesale market.”

Value chain additions

The Commission’s inquiries will also extend, they say, to these LPG wholesalers who act as middlemen, or brokers as referred to by the petroleum and gas industry, who “play” the market with allocations from manufacturers.

“Due to the shortages in LPG supply, these firms may have an impact on competitive dynamics at the wholesale level of the market. This impact will be explored during the market inquiry,” the announcement said.

Public participation

The Commission concluded that it would hold public hearings and hoped that “business enterprises along the LPG value chain, other related business enterprises, end-users, government departments, public entities, regulatory authorities, industry associations and any other stakeholders” would assist with their inquiry.

Other articles in this category or as background

  • http://parlyreportsa.co.za//communications/gas-act-changes-closer-to-implementation/
  • http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/doe-talks-biofuels-and-biomass/
  • http://parlyreportsa.co.za//uncategorized/competition-commission-promises-health-care-inquiry/

Posted in Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Liquid fuels industry short on BEE charter

Fuel industry attacked on BEE …

On the subject of black economic empowerment  (BEE), acting director of the department of energy (DoE), Tseliso Maqubela, told Parliament, before it went into short recess, that the major target for his department was to ensure a more immediate transformation of the liquid fuels industry.   Economic transformation in the energy sector was a top priority, he said, and he told the portfolio committee on energy that much more was needed to be done by this sector to improve the situation.

This was reminiscent of similar complaints made of the mining industry under the same BEE charter by the director general of the department of mineral resources.

Victor Sibiya said, as DoE’s  deputy director of petroleum products, also acting, that one of the three pillars of his department’s programme was compliance, monitoring and enforcement and whilst 30% of petroleum licensing permits showed around a 50% compliance factor this was not enough and new legislation was on its way to “toughen up” on B-BBEE regulations.

New code called for

The challenge at present, he said, was that the process of penalisation was far too cumbersome and did not deal sufficiently with repeated offenders.   A revised code was urgently required, he added.

On a separate subject, Sibaya said that as far as the basic fuel price (BFP) was concerned all calculations were based as if the final product had been produced in South Africa.  DoE was at work, he said, on a paper studying the various elements that contributed to the BFP, particularly with regard to smoothing out fluctuations to the consumer and attempting to align municipalities to the magisterial zones which governed the distribution.

Retail margins were also being studied in a second round of estimations working with operations carried out by what was referred to as the “DoE model service station”. Other factors included the shortly to be published biofuels price schedule which would govern the mix with petroleum products.

Reaching out

Further to economic transformation programmes, Sibaya spoke of a programme to establish fuel stations in deeper rural areas supplying other forms of energy needed by households such as LPG and extending services to include food, household retail goods and community services to improve quality of household life amongst the poor, another NDP priority.

In broad terms the acceleration of LPG supplies to rural areas, in fact to all areas in general, would contribute greatly, he said, to this objective.

Acting DG Tseliso Maqubela said he would respond to the parliamentary enquiry on the volatility of fuel prices in a prepared paper shortly, as this issue was also in the process of being studied at present. When asked about the levy on purchase of vehicles and where the funds went, Maqubela said this was in national treasury’s domain and was “probably an attempt by treasury officials to mitigate on carbon emissions”.

Refinery decisions

Touching on petroleum issues, DG of energy policy, planning and clean energy, Ompi Aphane, told the committee that a decision would be taken during 2016 on expanding oil refining capacity in South Africa based on the conclusions of the liquid fuels infrastructure plan.

Contributing to the basic costs of energy at the moment in South Africa, he said, were current world tensions particularly in the Middle East.   Self-dependency, however, was unfortunately only a long-term goal, he said.

A similar plan to increase refining was an increase in gas supplies based on the current gas usage master plan that had been started and this programme would be concurrent with an urgent expansion of gas storage facilities in the country.

Minister weighs in

Most of parliamentary question time was occupied by the new minister of energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson, who spoke broadly on energy issues; the fact that she recognised the need for urgent decisions by her ministry; and the necessity for her recently launched ministerial advisory committee on energy to receive input “in order that the opinions of all stakeholders can be considered.”

Such a ‘brains trust’, she said, should also include representation from the portfolio committee on energy itself.

Other articles in this category or as background

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//?s=bee+liquid+fuels

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/eskom-black-owned-coal-mining/

 

 

Posted in BEE, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry, Transport0 Comments

Gas Utilisation Master Plan gets things going

Gas a “game changer” in energy mix…

gas pipelineWith the publication for comment of the Gas Utilisation Master Plan (Gump) by the department of energy (DoE), South Africa came a step further towards the finalisation of its Integrated Energy Plan (IEP), meaning also that the document has received approval by the cabinet.

The document, based on a Green Paper released by DOE some years ago, provides a framework for investment in gas-supporting infrastructure and outlines the role that gas could conceivably play in the electricity, transport, domestic, commercial and industrial sectors.

LNG and gas, offshore -onshore

The Gump outlines, amongst other issues,  the import of liquified natural gas (LNG) and piped gas from Namibia and Mozambique and plans for production of natural and shale gas in South Africa.  A plan to have 67 GW of installed gas generation by 2050 is considered by the paper.
The plan is particularly relevant at the moment with Eskom having to rely, as grid backup during the current winter, on expensive diesel-fueled open-cycle gas turbines. The Gump proposals on electricity generation, talk of conversion to closed-cycle turbine power using gas.

The paper also expands on importing electricity from gas sourced from Mozambique and Namibia with lines to the Eskom system grid including imports from the largest present and mainly undeveloped gas fields in Tanzania neighbouring the northern Mozambique fields.

Learning curve

New minister of energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson, will have deepen her knowledge base very quickly on such matters as the IEP, energy resources and liquid fuels plans, all urgent and with immediacy.   Such issues as the process of energy integration overall and the issue of the stalled independent power producers (IPP) programme in terms of the held-over Independent System Market Operators (ISMO) Bill, are also waiting for position on the energy starting track.

DoE has also pointed to its intended coal gas programme with an IPP programme for the generation of some 6,500MW of power. The department further states that the Gump takes a 30-year view of the industry. It not only deals, they say, with the regulatory environment and economic predictions but does touch on social issues and environmental matters as well.

The master plan also talks of a gas line from Mozambique to Gauteng via Richards Bay and how gas will be distributed and stored, together with the issue of LNG terminal storage.

As a separate issue to Gump but part of the same overall plan, DOE has also released public comment the issue of investment by private merchants in fuel and gas storage, particularly referring to Saldanha Bay.

Storage, a vexed issue

Fuel storage at the present moment is traditionally undertaken by the major oil companies, in some cases integrated with state facilities and who can more easily absorb some of the more riskier aspects of this sector with their vertical interests both upstream and downstream.

DoE sees a greater contribution from investment by private merchants in storage and is currently attempting to re-structure the system to attract and build the industry to counter present storage problems and for early consideration as part of South Africa’s strategic fuels plan and as part of a licensing and regulation background.

In the short term, DoE says in its Gump programme, such a system is needed in terms of LNG holding reserves, imported as LNG or from state owned PetroSA’s gas-to-liquids plant at Mossel Bay, until more natural gas comes down the envisaged pipelines from the current exploration areas.

At the moment Sasol pipes 188-million gigajoules a year of gas into South Africa from Mozambique.  The possibility of LNG re-gasification plants offshore on the West coast in the near future is also debated in the Gump programme released.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/parliament-re-starts-oilsea-gas-debate/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/shale-gas-exploration-gets-underway/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/oil-and-gas-industry-criticizes-minerals-petroleum-bill/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/future-clearer-as-gas-amendment-bill/

Posted in Electricity, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Carbon offsets paper still open

emissionsCarbon tax offset plans down on paper….

A paper outlining proposals for a carbon offset programme for local businesses was released for comment a month ago, part of national treasury’s response to the challenge of reducing carbon emissions in South Africa.   Planned and instituted carbon emission reduction programmes will reduce carbon tax, the paper says.

Written comment on the paper is invited until 30 June 2014, which can be e-mailed to www.treasury.gov.za.    A little confusing at first is why what has been published should be dated 2010 but this is because the idea was first mooted in the 2010 Budget Review.

Black gold, maybe

The news of a carbon tax originally was not good for Eskom, their officials said in a submission to Parliament some time ago, Eskom being almost totally reliant on coal and to a small extent on nuclear input to the grid. What is known is that SA coal has the reputation of being particularly “dirty” insofar as carbon output is concerned making SA, relatively speaking, one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases.

The tax itself is a form of penalty despite the knowledge of the country’s reliance on coal, the government seemingly wanting to stay in the lead as far as the question of a carbon economy is concerned.

Carbon offsets are described in the paper now published as “a measurable avoidance, reduction, or sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) or other GHG emissions.”

Carbon reduction

Accordingly, the “softer” aspects of such a tax are designed for those who have other avenues for reduction of carbon to be used for offsetting against the tax or who have mitigation plans in process or proven as planned.    They amount to 5% to 10% for electricity, pulp and paper and 5% fixed for other key industries with varying thresholds according to investment in reduction.

According to national treasury, the paper “outlines proposals for a carbon offset scheme that will enable businesses to lower their carbon tax liability and make investments that will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions”, the plan as proposed for comment being designed to be introduced from 2016.

In the draft Bill, certain eligibility criteria for carbon offset projects are laid down.   The proposal is that successful projects will be awarded a “tradable emissions reduction credit”.    Projects could be the subject of energy saving and efficiency; transport re-organisation; agricultural emphasis on biomass; and waste applications, for example.

Commitments

In 2009, South Africa, at the UN conference on climate change, committed government to reducing carbon emissions from projected “business-as-usual scenarios” by 34 % in 2020 and 42% in 2025.  South Africa released a carbon tax policy paper last year.

The National Development Plan also calls on the nation to transform the local economy into an “environmentally sustainable low-carbon economy”.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/carbon-tax-comes-under-attack-from-eskom-sasol-eiug/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/treasury-sticks-to-its-guns-on-carbon-tax/

Posted in Electricity, Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Mineral and Petroleum Resources Bill halted perhaps

Mineral and Petroleum Act extends State rights…

New MPRDA starts with 20% free carry, maybe more….

oil rigThe Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, the legislation that will give the state a right to a 20% free carried interest in all new exploration and production rights in the energy field, has been passed by Parliament before it closed and sent to President Zuma for assent. According to press reports, new minister of mineral resources, Ngoako Ramatlhodi, may have halted the process by request, however, in the light of public sentiment and opposition moves to challenge the Bill’s legality.

Section 3(4) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (MPRDA) currently states that the amount of royalty payable to the State must be determined and levied by the Minister of Finance in terms of an Act of Parliament. This Act, in force, is the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Royalty Act 28 of 2008 but considerable uncertainty always surrounded how this would work and what was actually meant.

Any uncertainty has now been removed and the MPRDA amendments now passed have brought to an end a process which started when the draft Bill was first published for comment in December 2012.

Beneficiation of minerals included

mine dumpThe legislation seeks to “regulate the exploitation of associated minerals” and make provision for the implementation of an approved beneficiation strategy through which strategic minerals can be processed locally for a higher value – the exact definition of the word “beneficiation” yet having to be defined.

Importantly, the new Act will give clear definitions of designated minerals; free carried interest; historic residue stockpiles; a mine gate price; production sharing agreements; security of supply and state participation generally.

Stockpiles and residues affected

The new Act also states that regulations will apply to all historic residue stockpiles both inside and outside their mining areas and residue deposits currently not regulated belong to the owners. Ownership status will remain for two years after the promulgation of the bill.

In addition to the right to a 20% free carried interest on all new projects, ownership by the state can be expanded via an agreed price or production sharing agreements.

The NCOP concurred with Bill on its passage through Parliament and made no changes.

Legal commentators note that the Royalty Act, at present in force, triggers payment in terms of the MPRDA upon “transfer”, this being defined as the consumption, theft, destruction or loss of a mineral resource other than by way of flaring or other liberation into the atmosphere during exploration or production.

The Royalty Act differentiates between refined and unrefined mineral resources as “beneficiation”, this being seen as being important to the economy; incentives being that refined minerals are subject to a slightly lower royalty rate.

Coal and  gas targeted maybe

Nevertheless it appears, commentators note, that in terms of mineral resources coal is being targeted and also zeroed in on is state participation in petroleum licences. Others have pointed to the possible wish of government to have a state owned petroleum entity such as PetroSA to be involved fracking exploration.

Earlier versions of the Bill entitled the State to a free carried interest of 20% and a further participation interest of 30%, with the total State interest capped at 50%; however, the version that Parliament approved removed the reference to a 30% participation interest as well as the limit of 50%, effectively giving the State the right to take over an existing petroleum operation, law firm Bowman Gilfillan explained in a media release earlier this month.

Democratic Alliance (DA) Shadow Minister of Mineral Resources, James Lorimer said in a statement that the Act, “would leave the South African economy in a shambles”, adding that this would lead to people losing their jobs.

The DA has said it has now begun a process to petition President Zuma, in terms of Section 79 of the Constitution, to send this Bill back to the National Assembly for reconsideration,” he said.

Chamber opinion differs

Surprisingly, the Chamber of Mines stated that it “generally welcomed and supported” the approval of the MPRDA Amendment Bill, adding that it believed significant progress had been made in addressing the mining industry’s concerns with the first draft of the Bill, published back in December 2012.

Clearly the mining and petroleum industries particularly gas exploration industries, both of whom have separate equity BEE charters, are still very much at odds on the effects of the promulgation of such an Act, as is DA and the ANC.

Other articles in this category or as background

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/mprda-bill-causes-contention-parliament/

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/major-objections-minerals-and-petroleum-resources-bill/

Posted in BEE, cabinet, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

New biotechnology strategy on the way

Biotechnology and aspects of economy….

A new South African biotechnology strategy, with a focus on the economy and how biotechnology could be used to create a positive socio-economic impact would soon be launched, department of science and technology (DST) has said.

This has now been cleared by cabinet but very little is known on the actual document being prepared by DST other than it will focus on co-ordination between the various government departments dealing with biomass, bio technology, energy and the environment.

Creating jobs

On the subject of creating biofuels and biomass, the department of energy has told parliamentarians that the main objective of any such exercise, if it was undertaken in the agriculture industry, would be to create jobs.       However, such a move towards the use of biomass would not take place if national food or water security was jeapordised in any way.

This answer was given to the portfolio committee on energy by Muzi Mkhize, chief director hydrocarbons, department of energy (DOE), when briefing parliamentarians on DOE’s current strategy towards biofuels.  He said that in the South African context, a specific requirement of the biofuels strategy was to create a link between first and second economies and the focus was not only on jobs but specifically on creating employment in under-developed areas.

No document on the subject at this stage has reached Parliament.

Earlier articles on this subject:
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/doe-talks-biofuels-and-biomass/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/biofuels-development-stays-in-limbo/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/energy-resources-doing-it-better-and-quickly/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/doe-talks-biofuels-and-biomass/

Posted in Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, Land,Agriculture, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

biofuels become mandatory

derek hanekomBio-fuels brought in by law……

In launching South Africa’s bio-economy strategy, following the failed 2001 national version, minister Derek Hanekom also failed to mention that the reason that no entrants had been incentivised to join to date was because the new strategy now makes it an imperative for fuel companies to buy bio manufacturers output.

The new framework document stated that regulations regarding the mandatory blending of biofuels with petrol and diesel “were among the tools deemed to be the most appropriate legal instrument to achieve the desired outcome”.

October 1 2015

Mandatory blending regulations, which were set to come into effect on October 1, 2015, would guarantee the uptake of all biofuels supplied by licensed biofuels manufacturers by compelling licensed manufacturers of petroleum products and their wholesaling arms to buy and blend all the biofuels made available by licensed biofuels manufacturers.

According to earlier reports, fuel producers would be required to blend a minimum of 5% biodiesel in diesel and between 2% and 10% of bio ethanol in petrol.    Meanwhile, the framework document said an appropriate Biofuels Pricing Framework had also been created by the DoE, in conjunction with National Treasury and other economic departments, to financially incentivise the production of biofuels.

Biodiesel manufacturers would be granted a 50% general fuel levy exemption and would be entitled to accelerated depreciation on their manufacturing facilities and other tax incentives.

Making up for the past

At the launch, Minister Hanekom said that the bio-economy strategy would take the previous strategy from 2001 to the next level, creating an “enabling environment that will allow government departments, industry, venture capital and other stakeholders to move forward with initiatives that will be able to meet the challenges and embrace the opportunities of the future”.

This science-based strategy which was approved by cabinet in November last year positions bio-innovation as an essential factor in achieving the industrial and social development goals of the New Development Plan (NDP).

sorghumAll departments involved

The strategy proposes that bio-innovation will become an integral part in the activities of a wide spectrum of government departments including health, environment, energy and rural development.

Regulations relating to the licensing of manufacturers of biofuels, as well as criteria for the eligibility for government support were also included in the document.

The new bio-economy strategy, the minister said, is aligned to the National Development Plan, which considers science, technology and innovation key to the South African developmental agenda, as advances in these fields underpin advances in the economy and in society.  It is expected by government that by 2030 biotechnology and bio-innovation will be making a “significant contribution to South Africa’s gross domestic product.

Previous articles on this subject
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/doe-talks-biofuels-and-biomass/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/biofuels-development-stays-in-limbo/

Posted in Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, Land,Agriculture, LinkedIn, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Shale gas exploration gets underway

Intensive shale gas exploration in Eastern Cape….

The Eastern Cape Departmento f Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEDEAT) has launched a R16m shale gas exploration across four of its district municipalities, says Mining Weekly. This is the first phase of such exploration.

The department said in a statement that their shale gas exploration plans would extend from the Little Karoo right across to Buffalo City; the Joe Gqabi district municipality, which included the towns of Aliwal North and Burgersdorp; and the Chris Hani district municipality, which included the towns of Cradock and Queenstown towards Graaff-Reinet.

Groundwater reserves being established

The statement said that the initial phase of the project, which had been named Field Level Operation Water Watch, or FLOW2, would create a baseline for shallow groundwater reservoirs in the Eastern Cape ahead of shale gas exploitation, through a groundwater monitoring programme with community-based participation to stimulate capacity building and entrepreneurship.

The department said that the DEDEAT project would essentially determine a forensic analysis of water and gas fracking in the Karoo to determine whether it was safe, cost-effective and beneficial.

In understanding many of the issues and what was not known about shale gas and the extent of the reserves would be assisted and an assessment of the technical skills needed by the provincial economy to increase the benefits of shale gas exploitation made.

Posted in Earlier Stories, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, Land,Agriculture, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Oil/sea gas debate re-started by Parliament

Parliament calls for public input on gas debate….

Roughnecks wrestle pipe on a True Company oil drilling rig outside WatfordOn the prospects of transforming the gas industry through partnerships, the parliamentary portfolio committee on energy has invited comments.  Recent presentations to the portfolio committee have led to a renewed belief that gas, whether found and transformed, offshore or onshore, needs more focus.

The background to the invitation for comment, which will have no doubt come from chair Sisi Njikelana, says, “Current development of regional gas-fields will lead to natural gas becoming a more important fuel source in South Africa. With the availability of natural gas in neighbouring countries, such as Mozambique, Namibia and Tanzania, and the additional discovery of offshore gas reserves in South Africa, the gas industry in South Africa is poised to undergo expansion.”

The notice continues, “ Natural and coal gas play separate roles in the energy system, with natural gas being used solely as a feedstock for the production of synthetic fuels, and coal gas as an industrial and domestic fuel.”

“The gas industry in South Africa is regulated by the Gas Act 48 of 2001, which is currently being revised. As part of the build up to discussing amendments to this Act, Parliament wishes to engage the public on the topic of “Prospects of transforming the gas industry through partnerships”.

“Sub topics (as part of the main theme) can include (but not limited to) finance, pricing, infrastructure development, procurement, technology research and development, key success factors, skills development and transfer, community involvement and expansion of the gas industry in South Africa.”

Public hearings are scheduled for 30 January 2014. Interested individuals, organisations and institutions wishing to comment were requested in the notice to forward written submissions to the Portfolio Committee have been asked to declare an interest in making an oral presentation to the portfolio committee itself if they so wish.

Posted in Energy, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation0 Comments

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Earlier Stories

  • AARTO licence demerit system studied  …. In what has been a legislative marathon, the update of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act (AARTO) has now reached a stage […]

  • SARS role at border posts being clarified …. In adopting the Border Management Authority (BMA) Bill, Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs agreed with a wording that at all future one-stop border […]

  • Modernising SAPO a culture change ….. sent to clients 27 February…. Stage by stage, Mark Barnes, Group Chief Executive Officer of South African Post Office (SAPO), appears to be reforming cultures and […]

  • OECD money task force waiting for SA   ….sent to clients Feb 7…. Chairperson of the Standing Committee on Finance, Yunus Carrim, made it quite clear in terms of parliamentary rules that […]

  • President Zuma vs Parliament on FICA Bill …..editorial……The convoluted thinking that is taking place in South Africa to avoid the consequences of the law has once again become evident in […]