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Anti Corruption Unit overwhelmed

Focus on top down elements of patronage 

….editorial….As Parliament went into short recess, the Anti-Corruptionhawks-2
Unit, the combined team made up of SARS, Hawks, the National Prosecuting Authority and Justice Department, divulged that some 400 cases of public service corruption have been “successfully prosecuted since 2014”.

Out of hand

To have that number of public service thieves arrested is no small number but there is a worrying afterthought.   One wonders how many Anti Corruption Unit cases have been dropped or unsuccessfully prosecuted, given the fact such icebergcases are difficult to prove and there is often poor performance of by investigation teams. Like an iceberg, probably only one seventh of corruption in the public service is apparent.

sars logoCases currently under investigation in both the public and private sectors were given as 77, now 78 since Tom Moyane, head of SARS and member of the Anti Corruption Unit itself, at the time admitted to the Committee that he had not spoken to the Hawks about his second in command, Jonas Makwakwa.

Laundry list

The question by MPs was about the mysterious R1,2m deposited into Makwakwa’s private banking account.  According to reports it appears Moyane has subsequently rectified the situation and reported the event.  So yet another enquiry must start, which will only exacerbate the relationship problem between Moyane and the Minister of Finance, Gordhan Pravin.

Added to these national events in Parliament is the fact that corruption investigation remains particularly problematic at provincial and local government levels where it can go on undetected. The story emerging from the Tshwane Municipality is a case in point. The National Council of Provinces has no part to play in such matters.

Top down problem

Over the last few weeks, events in the parliamentary precinct have dominated the domestic media and consequently there is no need to repeat what is patently obvious.  South Africa clearly faces a leadership problem as far as financial governance and policy initiatives are concerned.

hawks logo
Doubt has placed, in the media in main, on the leadership integrity of the Hawks, NPA and, to some extent, with the Anti Corruption Unit inasmuch as their relationship with the President is concerned. A weary public waits for the next story of public service patronage.

Public service heads appear at times uncomfortable when they are reporting to Parliament and seem to be looking over their shoulder at times to see if what they have done or said is politically correct. Troubling is the fact that regulatory bodies are at odds with the ministries that founded them.

Bottomless pits

Although progress has been made on the national level in developing legalmoyane frameworks with provisions and regulations to address theft of public funds, such as the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act and the Public Finance Management Act (PMFA), the good guys are still behind in the race to catch the bad guys.   A sad conviction rate of 28% on cases brought before the court by the Assets Forfeiture Unit overall was quoted to the Standing Committee.

Poor leadership

On the same subject, the surprising failure by the President to sign into law the Financial Intelligence Centre Bill to fight money laundering in terms of international prudential agreements has represented a further setback. Hopefully this is only temporary since the country needs to join up the dots to encircle organised corrupt financial activity.

Worse, some government SOEs appear to conducting their own affairs without approval by Treasury. Cabinet members are involved. Witness the extraordinary offer made by the Central Energy Fund, reported in the media, to Chevron for its refinery in Cape Town and downstream activities in the form of 850 fuel outlets, presumably backed by the funds emanating from the sale of the Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF) reserves unauthorised by Treasury.

Upstream mayhem

Tesliso MaqubelaDDG Tseliso Maqubela of Department of Energy has now told the media that SFF sold the 10 million barrels of crude in storage in December at rock bottom price of $28 a barrel to a unit of Glencore, Vitol and a company called Taleveras. The condition of the sale was apparently, Maqubela said, “that the oil (will) not be exported and so the government considered it remaining as part of its strategic reserve stockpile.”

Shadow Minister of Energy, Pieter Van Dalen MP, citing Business Day, said the sale has been connected with Thebe Investment Corporation – “the ANC linked investment arm”, he added.   Vitol is the company that has allegedly bought the fuel stock and which owns Burgan Cape Terminals next to Chevron, the deal being linked by Van Dalen with Thebe for the building of its new storage tanks. Burger had just been awarded a 20-year lease by Transnet for land needed.

cape-town-harbourChevron brought to Parliament its case against Burger saying it was improper to build a new tank terminal next to its refinery for Burger to store oil for trading whilst they had no Transnet pipeline to Gauteng as did others from Durban but the chair of the portfolio committee accused Chevron of monopolistic behaviour. Subsequently the complaint was rejected. It was shortly after that Chevron announced its intention to sell its refinery.

Twisting path

Whether the Minister of Energy, Tina Joemat-Pettersson knew all of this when she appeared before the Portfolio Committee of Committee on Energy,tina-joematt her attendance covered in this report, is a moot point.   If she did know something, she is culpable in that she withheld the information, both from Parliament and possibly Treasury.

Alternatively, if she didn’t know that an offer was made to buy Chevron and that SFF had sold the state’s oil fund’s reserves to Swiss giant Vitol, possibly involving Thebe Investments, she should resign immediately as an incompetent.  Where the R4.4bn odd involved in the sale by SFF has landed up is not clear and when the oil will leave SFF’s Saldanha terminal and move to Burger in Cape Town is also not clear.

Clearly, in our view, this has been a major transaction known about at Cabinet level and the DA has called for an urgent enquiry. This will presumably bring the Asset Forfeitures Unit’s number of cases under investigation up to 79.   And so it goes on.  Tegeta and Eskom included.

Nothing but the truth

One senses a continuing cover up by government departments in reporting to Parliament for fear of upsetting any Minister’s apple cart, whereas Parliament should be a refuge of openness, accountability and public oversight on state activities and act as an arbiter to represent the people of South Africa.

vincent-smithIn the darkness, we saw a flash of light and a refreshing change when ANC MP, Vincent Smith, in grilling the Hawks as part of the Anti Corruption Unit interview, reminded them fiercely “This Is Parliament. If you cannot speak the truth, then do not speak at all.”  Whilst that remark may encapsulate the current problem, it may be also the cause of some Ministers and government officials choosing not to speak at all.

Legal jungles

Concurrent with the number of judicial enquiries into strange contracts, bad senior appointments, misuse of privileges and a litany of unaccountable expenditure without proper approval, what also has increased is the statement used by many when speaking to Parliament, including ministers, that the full facts cannot be given “because the matter is sub-judice”.

The number of matters that are sub-judice would not be so great if powers were given back the Treasury to re-assume its proper place in the parliamentary process.  Expenditure, if not approved by Treasury, would never see the light of day.

In conclusion

parliament 6Bad governance and corruption is the fodder that feeds the right wing anger sweeping the world and creates the spectacle that we see almost daily in our National Assembly, the creation of which institution is supposed to be one of the three pillars supporting the Constitution.

Previous articles on category subject

 Parliament, ConCourt and Business – ParlyReportSA

Parliament and the investment climate – ParlyReportSA

Anti-corruption law is watered down, say critics – ParlyReportSA

Nkandla vs NDP: the argument rages – ParlyReportSA

Parliament closes on sour note – ParlyReportSA

 

 

 

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PIC comes under pressure to disclose

Unlisted investments of PIC queried….

matjilaWhen asked for information on how the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) had invested its funds, Dr  Daniel Matjila, Chief Executive Officer, told parliamentarians that the most he could do, even with ‘listed’ investments, was to give only names. Any terms and condition of any investment agreement could not be made public. On ‘unlisted’ investments, he held back completely.

He was then formally asked by David Maynier (DA) if the PIC had invested, directly or indirectly, any funds in any Gupta-owned enterprise. He was also asked for details of any financial implications upon the Government Employee Pension Fund (GEPF) and other pension fund assets resulting from the dismissal by the President of former Finance Minister Nene.

Confidentiality

Dr Matjila responded that the fund “could not cross the line of disclosing private information” and the members ofPIC logo.2 the Standing Committee on Finance, before whom he was appearing “should not read into his statements any insinuation that the PIC was protecting information.” He noted that he was totally aware of the fact that the PIC was under investigation for passing funds to the ANC and any such idea “was totally false”.

As far as funds to any Gupta owned business was concerned, Dr Matjila replied that the organisation stood by its earlier answers to the media that it had not invested directly in any Gupta owned enterprise. Following this remark, ANC MPs stood by Dr Matjila and told Opposition members that the PIC could not become “entangled” in such questions which were veiled with gossip and insinuation. It was the word “directly” used by Dr Matjila that caused the question.

Sub-judice

yunus carrimThis point was emphasised by Yunus Carrim, Chairman of the Committee, that most of the questions that were concerning Mr David Maynier should only be dealt with after the investigation of the possibility of ANC funding by the PIC had completed its course. He said that Dr Matjila was bound by circumstances to say nothing.

Present at the standing committee meeting was Deputy Minister of Finance, Mcebisi Jonas, who said the reporting process of h a pension fund to the committee should not get side-tracked with politically motivated questions. Maynier had asked this time about the possibility of “indirect” investments by PIC of any Gupta businesses.

On the issue of the effect of the ‘9/12 issue’, as referred to by Dr Matjila when Nhlanhla Nene was fired, he reported that the impact of this event had caused “significant losses” to the PIC portfolio. The GEPF lost R95bn, the Unemployment Insurance Fund lost R7bn and the Compensation Fund had lost R3bn – all managed by PIC and the event had been most worrying.

However, he said that the performance of all the funds had been subsequently excellent in the sense that recovery was achieved quite quickly – in fact “the recovery represented more than all the PIC funds lost within those two days of crisis.”

Information withheld

David Maynier (DA) remarked that funding was still shrouded in mystery and that he was “extremelydavid maynier uncomfortable” that the PIC would give no information at all on the “unlisted” investments of PIC.

Reporting generally, Dr Matjila said the fund had benchmarked itself and its operations compared favourably with “top private sector investment companies”. The GEP Fund “had shown over five years a 14.3% interest factor compared, he said, to a global median of 9.9% and a local investor median of 10.1%.” It had invested approximately R33.9bn in numerous portfolios aimed to drive transformation and create jobs, he said.

He told parliamentarians that the PIC “had invested approximately R33.9bn in numerous portfolios aimed to drive transformation and create jobs.” He said any risk taking was carefully managed and remained on the conservative side. Furthermore, he assured MPs that PIC did not take any risk that could not be “managed”.

Listed investments growing

Dr Matjila said that for all investments, the total allocation was now R400bn and “partners were always sought that would make positive returns”. ‘Listed’ investments in the last five years had grown from R495bn to R892bn recording a growth factor of 12.5% per annum.

vodacom logoThe PIC always held to principle, he said, that there was always a need for BEE compliant businesses to be considered so that it attracted a portion of government expenditure. ‘Unlisted’ investments, nevertheless, had large share of the market holdings, he said, with roughly R55 billion allocated to this form of investment. The total allocation for PIC investments, including GEPF and UIF, was approximately R400bn.

On investment policy, Dr Matjila said that his team liked to look at partnering with other stakeholders that added value and knowledge to make sure that maximum benefits and input from any arrangement were received.

Downstream SMME outlets

On SMME development, Dr Matjila said that PIC was “in discussion with groups such as Spar and Woolworths to ensure that small business was represented in their current growth patterns.” He said it would seem important for PIC to participate further in the Barclays Africa “sell down”. PIC, he noted, had invested in many international and local companies with assets within South Africa “in order to drive economic growth and increase job creation.”

Dr Matjila turned finally to ‘unlisted’ investments and said PIC had a slate of roughly R55bn to work from. Such investments were usually international, he said, and were not necessarily BEE compliant. David Maynier (DA) asked whether the GEP Fund management was “comfortable with the fact that a confidentiality clause existed on so many investments and the fact that disclosure to Parliament was denied.” Some ANC members also mentioned disquiet on this issue. Maynier said he intended to pursue the issue of non-disclosure of “unlisted” investments further.

Previous articles on category subject
Retirement savings subject of treasury probe – ParlyReport
Treasury calls for “Twin Peak System” with two financial bills – ParlyReportSA

 

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International Arbitration Bill to replace BITs

Arbitration Bill gets SA in line with UNCTRAL …..

global trade graphicThe tabling of the International Arbitration Bill in Parliament will see ‘normalisation’ on a number of issues regarding arbitration between foreign companies operating in South Africa. This is if the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) policy recently expressed in Parliament by Minister of Trade and Industry, Rob Davies, is to be understood.

The Bill, as is the case with all international legal matters, will  be tabled by the Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development according to a government notice recently published.      Not all investors are necessarily impressed however, some preferring state-to-state bilateral trade treaties (BITs).   South Africa is now adopting the broader approach adopted by some international countries, including China.

Allowing arbitration outside of local courts

As far as is understood, as non-legal observers, formal agreement on the allowance on arbitration proceduresarbitration according to agreed procedures between trading parties will be instituted and local court procedures can be avoided if so wished.  The fact that South Africa has also very recently announced the launch of the China Africa Joint Arbitration Centre (CAJAC), “symbolising the deepening economic relationship between China and African economies”, seems to provide a background to the proposed Bill.

The route now to be followed by South Africa, it appears, is one of a number of limited ways that can improve access to justice services for companies doing business outside the country and foreign companies operating in South Africa and this seems to be the basis of DTI thought on the matter.

Down the track

Legal advice is better followed but a draft Bill it would now appear is being concluded in parliamentary terms.

unictral 1Such arbitration methods have terms which are non-country-specific.  In terms of adoption, the standards of ethical conduct devised by the UN trade body, the UN Commission on International Trade Law (UNCTRAL) and its manifesto, according to the background of the draft Bill, have been included.

BITs on way out

International arbitration can then be operated,it is proposed, between companies or individuals in different states usually by including a provision for future disputes in a contract with UNCTRAL. This is the next stage of the DTI’s moves to finalize the policy of discontinuation of bi-lateral trade agreements (BITs) with individual countries. The whole issue is based upon disputes that may arise and the new Bill now before Parliament follows the new route, which may mollify those parties complaining of BITs discontinuation.

More importantly DTI states, it lines South Africa up with the Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration, which has been adopted by UNCTRAL.   This model law is not binding but individual states may adopt such legislation by incorporating it into their own domestic law, which is now proposed.

It is understood that the current legislation could bind South Africa as a UN member of UNCTRAL but the rules to be adopted are a separate issue at the moment and will govern individual companies in any dispute that may arise under the new circumstances.

Again, specialist advice should be sought on this whole subject.

Previous articles on category subject

Protection of Investment Bill finally passed – ParlyReportSA

Changes to Protection of Investment Bill – ParlyReportSA

Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill re-tabled

Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill opens up major row – ParlyReportSA

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Parliament rattled by Sizani departure

Closed ranks on Sizani resignation…..

As South Africa struggles with the backlash of having had three finance ministers rotated in four days and
Stone-Sizani-XXX-news echoes around the parliamentary precinct that the Chief Whip of the ANC has resigned, there is a palpable feeling amongst MPs that all is not well within the governing party. The resignation of Hon Stone Sizani has come at a bad time.

Also, the legislation that is zeroed in at Parliament at the moment clearly indicates that President Zuma cares much about the rural vote and knows full well that in the months before the municipal elections that this is the power base that must be focused upon politically. His recent statement that land reform will be backdated to the 1800s manifests this view.

Team spirit

But then much of the political rhetoric at the moment is typical of a pre-election period. This has unfortunately arisen at a time that the country is on a knife’s edge in terms of both financial ratings and a possible increase in interest rates.

cropped-sa-parliament-2.jpgThe dilemma being experienced in parliamentary meetings at the moment is how to turn the ever apparent failure of government departments to meet their targets and constant reminders that projects have not even arrived at tender stage into the positive spin called for by business heads to kick start team spirit and overcome the country’s difficulties by creating more jobs.

The fact is that the parliamentary process calls for oversight of government activities and criticism is an essential part of any debate. It therefore becomes difficult to walk the fine line between exposing obvious failure and unwarranted expenditure at a time when the country needs only good news.

Good news

Maybe, it would be good then to report, as we hereby do, that the meeting between business heads and President Zuma has produced a positive reaction amongst most parliamentarians, except of course the EFF and extreme Left. It has produced the re-emergence of the MPRDA Bill, sadly without the scrapping of the Private Security Industry Bill. It has seen some excellent plans emerging in the world of SOEs and public utilities.

It has also seen the re-emergence of positive statements of progress in transport, roads and the positive fact that Eskom has reported to Parliament that it feels it can make it without load shedding at the tariff figure fixed by Nersa. Also the rush to spend enormous figures on nuclear power has been slowed down.

Certainly it is good to see at most meetings reference made to the saving of unnecessary expenditure and an acceptance by most in Parliament that things cannot go on as they were.

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Protected Disclosures Bill: employer to be involved

New Protected Disclosures Bill ups protection….

sent to clients 21 January……The Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Affairs will shortly be debating the recently tabled Protected Disclosures Amendment Bill which proposes a duty or responsibwhisleblower policyility on employers to explain and inform employees on the procedures for dealing with a whistle-blower’s disclosure and consequent issues surrounding.

The new Bill also makes it a clear requirement that employees should be informed by the employer that they are “entitled to exercise certain remedies if they are subjected to an occupational detriment as a result of having made protected disclosures”. Clearly, intimidation of the whistle blower is still the object of concern and still an issue.

The term “occupational detriment” is now to encompass any potential “detrimental behaviour suffered by those who previously fell outside of the scope of the Act”. It is also proposed that the definition of “disclosure” be amended.

Definition to include “workers”

An important feature of the new Bill is that the definition of a whistle-blower is also extended to in include “workers” rather than just employees. This therefore includes a person who has “worked” on the premises, i.e. to ensure that independent contractors, consultants, agents and persons working or who have worked for the State are included.

The Bill also seeks to re-define the expression “occupational detriment” to include an employee or worker being subjected to any civil claim for the alleged breach of a duty of confidentiality or a confidentiality agreement arising out of the disclosure of a criminal offence.

A clause states that if “occupational detriment derived from disclosure is proved in a court of law, employers will have to pay compensation or damages to the employee or worker.” Whistle blowers will be excused from criminal justice, it seems.

Law reform overview 

The Mlaw booksinister states in the objectives of the new The Protected Disclosures Amendment Bill, now to be debated in Parliament, that the changes emanate from the South African Law Reform Commission’s report on protected disclosures. The Bill will “empower employees to approach the court for relief in the face of detrimental behaviour shown towards them by employers” and “employees and workers will also be immune from civil and criminal liability flowing from a disclosure that reveals criminal activity.”

False whistle-blowing

However, it is to be noted that in reverse, as it were, should an employee knowingly or believing the information not to be true, disclose false information they will be guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable to a fine or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding two years or both.

The draft of the current Bill was published by the Minister for public comment in July last year, the purpose of the Act itself being to set down the procedure for disclosing unlawful behaviour in the workplace by both private and public sector employees and how such disclosure is to be protected.
Previous articles on category subject
Protected Disclosures Act: More whistleblower cover – ParlyReportSA

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Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill re-tabled

Revised Investment Bill gives some ground…..

Rob+DaviesA crucially re-amended version of the Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill has been re-tabled in Parliament by DTI that gives ground to some degree on the question of rights of investors regarding international arbitration regarding disputes in terms of the new ground breaking  legislation.

During his budget vote speech, Trade and Industry Minister, Rob Davies, stated that the Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill would finally be retabled in Parliament, meaning that it will definitely not be signed into law as it was and that it would be subject to changes.

That Bill has now been re- tabled and no doubt being studied by all.

Past bilaterals respectedPromotion and Protection of Investment Bill 

Promoted by Minister Davies specifically, the Bill as it was voted through but not signed by the President ignored existing bilateral investment treaties (BITs) between South Africa and other countries in the EU whilst extending protection to new investors from all other countries. The new Bill as amended clarifies that this does not apply retrospectively.

Minister Davies said at the time, which was worrying to many foreign companies, that there was a trend he felt amongst developing countries to ignore such treaties although they might have been agreed to by previous governments.

Impediment to investment

Africa-map-with-coinsUnder BITs at present, trading investors are allowed to have arbitration proceedings as laid down by World Bank rules.   International arbitration, for obvious reasons, is preferred by investors as it is impartial and not in the hands of the country invested in, as is promoted the Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill making it localised.

Minister Davies is on record as saying that that “South Africa had significant foreign direct investment from the US, Japan, Malaysia, India and other countries, and we have no bilateral investment treaties with them”. He commented in Parliament, some time before this budget vote speech, that such bi-lateral agreements on the whole were “irrelevant”.

The Bill as it stood allowed for acquisition by the state in the ownership of foreign companies “in a just and equitable manner”.  Such nebulous wording was rejected by the international business community in South Africa. Minister Davies said at the time when the Bill was passing through the portfolio committee on trade and industry, that “protection for overseas investors will be in terms of South Africa’s Constitution”, which he said, “provided significant and robust protection for investors and for property, both domestic and foreign.”

A “Bit” better

legalWhat the re-written Bill contains is a clause granting an investor the right to be treated no less favourably than South African investors as long as their investments are ‘‘in like circumstances’’. This is qualified by the clause which states, “The Bill provides for the security of investors and their investments. It seeks to clarify that the Republic bears no greater obligation to foreign investors than to its own investors in respect of their investments.”

However, on the rights under BITs agreements for arbitration or mediation internationally on new investment, it would appear that DTI have relented to some degree. After describing the whole process of local mediation which has to be undertaken first, the re-drafted Bill still insisting on this, a clause has been inserted that “the government may consent to international arbitration in respect of investments covered by this Act, subject to the exhaustion of domestic remedies. Such arbitration will be conducted between the Republic and the home state of the applicable investor.”

The Bill is now being digested and presumably Parliament will announce new hearings and call for further submissions.

Other Bills coming

ack bdlive

ack bdlive

In his budget vote speech a few weeks ago, Minister Davies confirmed that a Copyright Amendment Bill would also come before Parliament in the current financial year, together with a National Gambling Amendment Bill (as distinct from the Remote Gambling Amendment Bill before Parliament at present).

He also referred to a Liquor Amendment Bill which is suspected of being somewhat draconian. The whereabouts of the Intellectual Property Rights policy paper is also long outstanding from the Department of Trade and Industry.

Other articles in this category or as background
Promotion and Protection of Investment Bill opens up major row – ParlyReportSA
Private Security Industry Bill comes closer – ParlyReportSA

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DTI does flip flop on BEE codes

B-BBEE codes changed on “management control”…

Rob+DaviesA  lack of understanding of the effect of B-BBEE Codes on business and the industrial environment, despite a workshop on the subject, was demonstrated when the department of trade and industry (DTI) amended its own amendment in a matter of days on the point scoring issue in terms of broad- based employment share ownership schemes.

More emphasis has been placed in the Codes generally on procurement from black business, now referred to as “supplier development”.

As you were…

However, the minister of trade and industry, Dr Rob Davies, confirmed in a statement that the second amendment corrected the changes as far as employment schemes were concerned and any such changes would not be retrospective on deals already done, such earlier deals continuing to reap the same benefits under B-BBEE Code pointing as before.

Control is everything

Minister Davies said that DTI still had a think tank operating on how further to make BEE in generalplan BEE more effective insofar as pressure on business was concerned to effectively ensure that management, control and ownership by black persons was increased.  His task team appointed would report back by the end of the month. He repeated this in his budget vote speech.

DTI completely avoided established government procedure by issuing an “explanatory notice” to a gazetted publication on B-BBEE procedures by announcing a completely new aspect on the rules on B-BBEE award-pointing, in this case termed as “amending guidelines”, thus avoiding the issue of public comment.

Most worrying was the fact that minister Rob Davies failed to make any reference to this in his earlier introduction to DTI’s strategic plan to Parliament a week before, subsequently presented to the portfolio committee on trade and industry by DG Lionel October and then to the select committee on economic affairs in the NCOP.

Forgot the union movement

Just as as business leaders were, so was the trade union movement, many of whose members are part of share employment schemes, options or not, and are therefore touched on the issue of reduced profit and dividends.

As far as not mentioning this in a budget vote speech, which was an excellent opportunity to inform business, there is fine line, say opposition members, between failure to disclose to Parliament and avoiding a contentious disclosure to Parliament that that might compromise a negotiation but in this particular case of changes to B-BBEE, the matter  appears to have only involved some members of cabinet and certainly none of the large spectrum of stakeholders involved. It all came as a big surprise.

The minister has published two further notices on the amended B-BBEE Codes regarding the second phase now implemented. The Chamber of Mines was yet another body caught by complete surprise, thinking that their relationships, in this case the minister of mineral resources, were far better than they actually now seem to be. There seemed to be a vacuum in communications.

DTI has now reported to Parliament on subject

To the rescue...

To the rescue…

DTI, in the form of DG Lionel October, has since reported to Parliament on the subject of the amended B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice and explained that Minister Davies had admitted that DTI had taken the wrong route with all good intention “to take a narrower view on black management control” but now had apologised for the descision, now reversed, on this aspect of the pointing system. All is reversed, retrospectively as well.

A full report is with our clients with further comments by DTI on the Codes and their application as revised “after the event”.     This analysis of DTI’s presentation will be archived to this website in the course of time.

In the meanwhile, we note that there is useful extra-parliamentary political comment on http://www.polity.org.za/article/da-geordin-hill-lewis-calls-for-debate-in-parliament-over-elitist-bee-codes-2015-05-08

Other articles in this category or as background on this website
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/dti-earns-ire-parliament-bee/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/liquid-fuels-industry-short-transformation/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/one-year-implement-b-bbee-codes/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/b-bbee-codes-of-good-practice-far-onerous/

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Expropriation Bill has now to be faced

Much of the sting goes out of Expropriation Bill…..

landseizuresThe subject of expropriation, not necessarily of land but any property, has now reached the stage of a considerably watered down third Bill which has now been tabled and whilst there are grumbles from many quarters, it appears that the new Bill has not caused the same furore as its predecessors.

The long awaited Expropriation Bill (B4-2015) came before Parliament in the form for a briefing to the portfolio committee of public works attended by the minister of public works, Thulas Nxesi, the briefing itself remaining very much in the hands of the deputy minister, Jeremy Cronin.

Great emphasis was laid by both ministers on the difference between expropriation as a “public purpose” and expropriation “in the public interest”, a difference they said that was clearly laid out in South Africa’s Constitution.

Public purpose, public interest

nxesiMinister Nxesi in his introduction said if there was a need to put up electricity lines or build a road, it was then for a “public purpose” and he saw that there could be no argument – a statement which was later queried by opposition members.

However, minister Nxesi said, expropriating property for “public interest” had to pass a rigorous rationality test as stipulated in the Constitution but a major problem with all Bills previously tabled was that there was no recourse to the courts and on this issue the cabinet had decided to withdraw them. Jeremy Cronin seemed to come to the rescue with a far more detailed and rational presentation.  

He argued that expropriation was an essential mechanism or tool for any state in any country to acquire property under certain instances but much emphasis had been laid in South Africa on the issue of land and white commercial farmers.

He admitted that whilst “public interest includes the nation’s commitment to land reform” in the Bill before them, a fact emphasised in the preamble to the Bill, the proposed legislation was very much in the nature of a mechanism to deal with expropriation rather than say who it applied to.

Expropriation just a “tool”

croninMinister Cronin added that this was one of many reforms taking place to bring about equitable access to all South Africa’s natural resources and reforms to redress the results of past racial discriminatory laws or practices. Such a preamble existed in much of South Africa’s legislation since 1984.

He said, “The Constitution requires “just and equitable” compensation to be determined by having regard of all circumstances without placing undue weight on any single or particular factor. National, provincial and local government were empowered to expropriate property to varying degrees through several pieces of legislation, he noted.

Deputy minister Cronin tracked the history of the Bill before them stating that the 1975 Expropriation Act was totally unconstitutional as it gave draconian powers to the state and was “wisely” withdrawn. A further 2007 Bill was also removed on these grounds and the current Bill was unable to be processed for Parliament before the 2014 elections.

In line with Constitution

settlement_law_justice_However, he said, the Expropriation Bill B4-2015 seeks to ensure consistency with the Constitution and to provide uniformity of procedure of all expropriations without interfering with the powers granted to the expropriating authorities.

Opposition members claimed that the Bill enlarged upon the definition of “public interest” contained in the Constitution and the Bill could not do this constitutionally. Nor did the Bill talk to in broad terms to the issue of compensation, whether it be a commercial farm or alternative accommodation for a shack dweller.

They argued that the new Bill did not talk to the issue of the interest of a bank in terms of a mortgage and where the bank might stand on such issues. The Bill now tabled, minister Cronin said, detailed the manner in which the expropriating authority had to follow, as well as setting up the process of evaluation and the authority to do this “in a just and administrative way”.  

On mortgages and loans from a bank, he said it was the bank that will be expropriated and not the individual.

Credibility of Bill challenged

masangoDA member Masango contradicted this and said any agreement or loan was between a person and the bank and not the state and the bank and he asked how the Bill could have possibly got through the NEDLAC process.

He also raised the issue of poor people not be able to afford litigation if the process of expropriation was contested. ANC member Madlopha said “whilst the media had been rubbishing the Bill, saying that it targets white commercial farmers”, the Bill in her mind gave the state power to expropriate with only a simple notice to the property owner, a process which seemed to contradict with common law.

Blaming apartheid and more

Minister Cronin responded along the lines that in expropriation, the property clause in the Bill of Rights guided the process. Indeed, argument, he said, will no doubt occur on “just and equitable compensation matters” but this did not remove “the consideration of colonial injustice”.   

It was the Constitution, he said, that insisted that in determining “justice and equitable” compensation it should include the process of “restitution”. Deputy Minister Cronin commented that expropriation did not just affect white commercial farmers and any compensation would consider the amount of bond outstandings. 

He concluded that the new Bill was attempting to shorten the process of any litigation. He added that the NEDLAC findings on the Bill would be supplied to Parliament and suggested that the committee ask Agric-SA to appear before them to obtain their views.

Other articles in this category or as background

Zuma goes for traditional support with expropriation –

ParlyReportSA New approach to land reform – ParlyReportSA

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Pravin tackles COGTA intervention at local level

 COGTA getting somewhere with municipalities…..

pravin gordhan MTBSIt is quite apparent why the seemingly impossible task of integrating local, provincial and national government service has been given to minister Pravin Gordhan of cooperative governance and traditional affairs (COGTA). He seems quite determined that all provinces and municipalities have to deliver on their constitutional mandate.

His department of cooperative governance (DCOG) recently updated Parliament on the current situation, led by some opening remarks by the minister himself.   He went straight to the nub of the issue by stating that section 139 of the Constitution provided for intervention by the relevant provincial executive if a municipality could not or did not fulfil an executive obligation.

First steps

Whilst the Local Government Reform Act, passed in 2014, has helped considerably by refining local electoral areas nationally down to 137, whilst 95 municipal districts have been designated in most cases to correspond with electoral areas. Thus, more representative structures have been established although some suspected at the time this was an election ploy.

Stabilisation of local government was the key, said minister Pravin to parliamentarians, and the process of “Back to Basics”, one of the 16 SIP strategic items on the list of the National Development Plan, was the basis of the department’s 2015/6 annual performance plan. This to ensure municipalities performed in their dealings with local government at the coal face.

Minister Pravin said, “Local government plays a key role in determining whether people live with dignity and whether they are able to access economic opportunities, consequently contributing to the overall development of the country”.    Part of COGTA’s mandate, he said, was to understand and support the development of intergovernmental relations in all three tiers of government.

New Bill to make third tier accountable

vusi madonaselaVusi Madonsela, DG of DCOGTA, advised that they were “aiming to build accountability for performance in local government systems by setting and enforcing clear performance standards by March 2019. To this end a new Intergovernmental Monitoring, Support and Intervention (IMSI) Bill would be processed through Parliament.

The performance of municipal public accounts committees (MPAC’s) therefore in all “dysfunctional municipalities as well as municipalities with adverse and disclaimer opinions would be monitored and enforced”, he said.

Changing attitudes to debt

Madonsela also said, “The culture of payment for services would be encouraged nationally with campaigns” and part of DOCG’s task was to improve the ability of at least 60 municipalities to collect outstanding debt. He named other targets such as to strengthen anti-corruption measures by 2019 and to have achieved a full local government anti corruption tribunal systems working.

He also said DCOG would start with 12 districts to develop integrated development plans and eight cities and towns would also be supported and monitored in developing long term strategies and proper spatial development programmes.

Skills always the problem

Opposition members called on COGTA for better performance by local government training SETAs. Many institutions were conducting training programmes for councillors but in the process had found that many councillors literally have no skills or formal education. Madonsela responded by saying there were now regulations being passed to weed out unqualified persons and those with false CVs.

Minister Pravin agreed that some of the factors that led to dysfunctional local government structures included political instability and problems with service delivery and institutional management inability.  Councillors were nominated and appointed by their political parties, he said, and “perhaps it should be a conversation amongst MPs on how councillors should be appointed.”

Back to “Back to Basics”

The net result at the moment, said minister Gordhan, that one in three municipalities, according to a study conducted nationwide, were failing and the success of the “Back to Basics Programme” would now depend on inter-government transfers to bring in skills and changing the employment criteria to economic, tax and financial viability experience.

He concluded that his department was getting tough where municipalities had broken the law and some of the answers may lie in strengthening district municipalities with specialists and merging some municipalities.   Another option was to abolish local municipalities completely and in their stead, start again with district management areas but he did not elaborate on this.
Other articles in this category or as background
Municipal free basic services slow – ParlyReportSA
Local government skills totally lacking – ParlyReport
Electricity connections not making targets – ParlyReportSA

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Government communications accused of promoting ANC

Department of communications accused of cloning ANC slogans…..

country wants youThe opposition has complained that the department of communications (DoC) and government communications information services (GCIS) are using ANC party slogans for a DoC communications and PR campaigns, such campaigns costing millions of rands.

The complaint was lodged by Gavin Davis, DA member of the parliamentary portfolio committee on communications and a DA whip, during a presentation by DoC on progress of setting up the newly reconstituted DOC with new responsibilities and reporting at the same time ion liaison with the similarly, newly re-constituted department of telecommunications & postal services (DTPS).

Brand South Africa had moved from department of public service to DoC, it was reported.   SABC remained with DOC; the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA), previously reporting direct to a minister was now with DOC as well, and the Films and Publications Board (FPB) moved from department of home affairs. Also, important was the transfer of the (GCIS) to DoC.

At the same time, parliamentarians were told of the new mandates on matters related to the Independent Communications Authority of SA (ICASA), some of which were in the area of broadband and telecommunications and therefore had to remain with DPST. 

Hot under the collar

It was in the discussion and questions on the campaigns of Brand SA, using the combined power of this re-organisation together with the communications strategies of GCIS, that most of the questions arose. At various points the meeting became quite heated. on the issue of slogans and party posters.  Present was the deputy minister of communications, Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams, who could be seen at times to be visibly angry under questioning.

tv flat screenPresented by the DDG of communications, Gift Buthelezi, was a progress report of the national communication strategy, which included details of the processes to be used, media deployed and messages to be conveyed in the communications campaign of Brand SA aimed at the South African public.  The objective was “to increase pride in being a South African”.

Upfront minister

stella abrahamsDeputy minister Ndabeni-Abrahams took it upon herself to answer 95% of the questions asked during question time on the various presentations made, not the director general.   

On a number of occasions the debate reached the level of a public spat, particularly on the questions surrounding statements made in the presentations at the meeting which conflicted with statements made by senior executives of the SABC at different times and on different occasions.

First, shadow minister of communications, Gavin Davis, complained that the line adopted by the DoC campaign for all government departments and media placings, “Together We Move South Africa Forward”, was in fact an ANC slogan and used at the recent ANC conference. He said the DoC was clearly bringing party politics into government spending.

Good news

ANC athen added that the ANC had fielded a successful electoral manifesto to the whole country at the election based on this line and therefore took this as a mandate for government to also adopt this “because obviously this was what the majority wanted. She said DoC had plenty of “good news” to impart.

They (the public) had said so when they voted”, she said, and emphasised that there was nothing “sinister in this”. “Togetherness and pride in South Africa”, she added, were the key neutral expressions being used to shape the campaign, she said.

ANC members argued that pride in South Africa could be encouraged by sports events, regular communications on subjects that affected the ordinary citizen focused on the “good news”, such as cleaning up corruption and government successes.

Gavin Davis (DA) then asked the minister how DoC, as a government department, could possibly involve itself in building up such issues as “pride”. He said that pride in one’s country was a personal issue and it was not the job of a government to manipulate this feeling with what might be described as propaganda.

He also said it was impossible to neither measure such things as “pride” nor manipulate the emotion and called for detail on how this could be achieved with PR campaigns when such issues were governed or frustrated against a background of political and economic facts, which at this time were far from good.

Gupta’s “New Age”

Davis said he was also unsatisfied by the answer given to his question as to why R10m should be spent on the publication New Age for advertising when they only had some 10,000 readers and queried the media spend in general. The answer given was stated by Davis as being “totally undecipherable”.

He also asked for clarification on the statement made by DoC that a 70% quota of what was published and broadcast had to be “localised”, DoC having emphasised local news would be disseminated in future as a priority as distinct from international news. 

sabc news logoMinister Ndabeni-Abrahams said she did not necessarily agree with SABC editorial policy on this issue, the  SABC management being quoted by Davis as having said that SABC will in future broadcast the good news which would be local news”.   The minister said her earlier  statement, and that of DoC, was that  a figure of 70% for local news was the correct one.   Davies then asked if she were prepared to tell the SABC this fact.

At this stage minister refused to answer any more questions on the subject and accused the opposition of being provocative.

Other articles in this category or as background
Overhaul of broadband policy underway – ParlyReportSA
Communications bill awaited setting up consumer body – ParlyReport
More state powers for ICASA proposed – ParlyReportSA

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Private Security Industry Bill comes closer

Motive for Private Security Bill unclear…..

adt securityAs of this date, the Private Security Industry Bill still remains for signature by President Zuma passing it into law, having had the contentious clause that South Africans must own at least 49% of shareholding of any security companies, as proscribed in the original Bill passed by Parliament, increased to 51%.

However, from statements made by senior officials in the department of police and the minister himself it seems quite possible that government will push the law through despite the stated objections of security  industry associations and the possibility of the industry taking government to court on the matter.

The Bill introduced two years by minister Nathi Mathethwa, then a protégé of president Zuma but now reduced to the post of minister of arts and culture, posed the reasons for a controlling number of 51% being the result of the possibility of national security breaches by foreigners in South Africans affairs. This has never been defined.

Ek is die Suid-Afrikaanse

Such a matter was stated by the local security industry as being absurd since most South African management, local shareholders and certainly the majority of employees were South Africans anyway. In can only be assumed that the government thinks their are “plants” by foreign countries working in the industry, or alternatively, the reasons given by the state are a cover for some other motive, as of yet not clear.

Immediately the Bill was tabled, opposition members in Parliament pointed out that such a law would place SA not only in violation of international trade agreements but place the country in jeopardy of renewal of AGOA by the United States, of valuable export trading advantage to South Africa.

Particularly, South Africa is in danger of violating GATT agreements, but the minister of police has responded with the names of other countries discounting international agreements on the issue of local ownership control.

In a rush to close Parliament for the May elections last year, the Private Security Industry Bill, with other Bills, was hammered through Parliament using every possible ANC vote but, however with the 51% clause reduced to 49%.  This has now been reversed.

Trade and Industry unconcerned

Unless the Bill is returned to Parliament unsigned, a course, which would seemingly make the new police minister Nkosinathi Nhleko unhappy, and with minister of trade and industry (DTI), Rob Davies, appearing ambivalent on the whole issue, all would seem set for a suicidal dive into unknown international trading waters as far as obligations are concerned.

This is despite a trade delegation visit to the US on the subject. Recent statements by US congressmen and a joint letter addressed by them to SA on other possible violations of GATT by the DTI, particularly on poultry import issues threatening AGOA, are all being played down by cabinet ministers.

 American Chamber of Commerce in SA have pointed to the difficulty, not only with B-BBEE but with this proposal, the difficulty US/SA companies operating in South Africa have with their head offices in parting with ownership of their companies.

The police minister says that he “finds that South Africa will meet its trade obligations under GATT and the action will not threaten AGOA” – an unusual statement for a minister of police, whilst DTI itself, or the minister of trade and industry, still seem have their heads well below the water line.

Under the skin

Eventually, it will emerge what it that is so worrying to the department of police about companies like ADT, Tyco, Securitas, Chubb and the many Japanese, Korean and British companies involved in the manufacture and supply of security equipment….. all at the risk of disinvestment or, worse, maybe an imagined xenophobic wish for these countries not to employ ex-pats or immigrants from other parts of Africa. 

Other articles in this category or as background

No moves on new Private Security Industry law – ParlyReportSA

Private Security Industry Bill gets through Parliament – ParlyReportSA

DA’s Crucial Infrastructure Bill tabled on security – ParlyReportSA

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Parliament circulates Russian technology agreement

 

Partnership in techno between SA and Russia…

russian flagThe agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Russian Federation on scientific and technological cooperation has now been tabled in Parliament, according to a notice published recently. It includes an annex between the same parties, the point being made strongly that both Russia and South Africa are part of BRICS which includes Brazil, India and China and indicating similar agreements. After much to-ing and fro-ing in 2014 between Moscow and Pretoria by minister of energy Tina Joemat-Pettersson and a separate visit by President Zuma for personal reasons it seems but who met President Vladimir Putin, a Russian Federation delegation was reported as having visited Tuynhuis in the Parliamentary precinct in early December last year, meeting Speaker of the House, Baleka Mbete.

The “R” in BRICs

The actual agreement was signed by the chairperson of the National Council of Provinces, Thandi Modise, who appears to have hosted the event. It was also signed by the deputy chairperson of the council of the Federation of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation, Ilyas Magomed-Salamovich Umakhanov. In a statement issued at the time in Cape Town, it was announced that “the two Parliaments had agreed to strengthen ties and cooperation through exchange programmes and to encourage freer movement of people between the two countries.”

Not just science

Education, agriculture, economic cooperation and coordination in the global arena were also identified as key areas for closer cooperation. “This memorandum of understanding is testimony to the historical, present and future ties between our countries,” Ms Modise said.   With regard to the use of the word “historical”, President Zuma mentioned in his recent SONA address that the bodies of “two veterans of the apartheid struggle” were to be repatriated and re-buried in South Africa. The statement issued at the time by Ms Modise stated, “Members of Parliament should not be left behind in developments taking place at executive level between their countries.” Other articles in this category or as background Nuclear goes ahead: maybe “strategic partner” – ParlyReportSA Nuclear and gas workshop meeting – ParlyReportSA National nuclear control centre now in place – ParlyReportSA

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National low income retirement plan ahead

 State retirement plan possible….

dol logoIn terms of what has been expected for quite some time, the department of labour (DoL) is soon to launch an investigation into a national retirement mechanism for low income earners. Such has been announced to the parliamentary committee on labour.

DoL, in a statement issued shortly after the meeting had been held, added that a discussion paper on the issue would be tabled at Nedlac in the near future.

In the last month of the previous parliamentary session the portfolio committee on labour held a number of workshops on the minimum wage issue and other matters perceived as critical in the labour field. Pensions for low income earners was one of them.

Stakeholders join in

During these workshops, which the department’s performance against set targets contained in the strategic plan and annual performance plan was evaluated, strategies were developed by participating parties, contributing parliamentarians and DoL.

DoL also stated that it would be talking to ILO as part of its investigations into a national retirement programme, not only as far as best practices were concerned but also into what had been found possible and practical at certain income levels elsewhere.

old mutual logoIn a recent survey undertaken by the Old Mutual on retirement plans, 42% of respondents were found to have no formal retirement provision in place at all and 85% of those that did, stated their concern on not having enough money to retire as their greatest worry due to fears surrounding inflation.

DoL is now to go a step further into the area of the of an income bracket lower than dealt with by private pension fund operators and, says DoL, plans are also afoot to investigate the possibility of including government employees in the benefits offered by UIF and also the effectiveness of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act.

Other articles in this category or as background
Labour committee ignores strikes – ParlyReportSA
Parliament delays process on Labour Relations Bill – ParlyReportSA

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Medicines Bill : focus on foodstuffs

DOH responds on new Medicines Bill……

patientDr Anban Pillay, DDG of the department of health (DoH), has made it quite clear in answering public comments on the proposed amendments to  the Medicines and Related Substances Act  that their concerns regarding foodstuffs are not just confined to the labelling of food and providing a list of the contents of any food products but also the actual food content itself contained in the product and any harmful effect it might have on the consumer.

In this regard, Dr Pillay has said there was to be much closer contact between DoH and the department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF), the lack of co-ordination becoming apparent during the recent scandal when horse meat and donkey meat had been discovered in the contents of named foodstuffs brands without any public awareness to this effect.

This and many other comments were made on submissions recently put before the parliamentary portfolio committee on health during the debate on the Medicines and Related Substances Amendment Bill.

No separation from cosmetics

Dr Pillay also made it quite clear that comments in submissions suggesting that food stuffs and cosmetics be isolated into separate legislation parallel with medicines and related substances was a non-starter.  DoH, he said, had already recruited 25 new permanent staff members that would be working for the South African Heath Products Authority (SAHPRA) who were in the process of considering a food agency, food being very much within the ambit of the one Act.

A good number of the changes in the Bill before Parliament arose in the area of vitro diagnostics (IVD), or tests with equipment which assisted medical diagnosis by sampling body tissue and fluids.    In this regard, the wording of international medical regulatory bodies had been used whereby such equipment had to meet certain performance requirements. This was in contrast to medicines and related substances issues which dealt primarily with matters of efficacy.

Big retailers excluded

On the question of the issue of licences to trade issued by the new Medical Control Council (MCC), it had been conceded that retailers dealing exclusively with bulk products classified as unscheduled medicines did not have to comply with all SA Pharmacy Association requirements or obtain a licence from the MCC.

Comments in submissions had been made and by the opposition that the regulating body would find it difficult to exercise its authority with regard to product advertising in all forms of electronic media, particularly if it extended to social media.  Dr Pillay said that this was acknowledged but he asked for his detractors to note that advertising and marketing world was an ever-evolving subject and attempts had to be made to deal with false claims and failure to meet requirements in all forms of advertising media whatever the problems of doing so.

Debate on medical devices

Regarding criticism on the descriptions and definitions in the amending Bill with regard in the approval of medical devices and the ambits of inclusion and exclusion, Dr Pillay said DoH had fallen back on an updated version agreed upon by the International Medical Device Regulatory Forum, which was more appropriate, he said.

Considerable debate took place upon the issue of controls on pricing, raised in a number of written submissions. DoH had agreed that the amendments would clearly state that the agreed pricing committee would be the final body to make recommendations on such matters to the minister of health. Meanwhile, the MCC would confine its activities to quality, safety and efficacy, not pricing.

Furthermore, Dr Pillay confirmed it was the pricing committee alone who were to “pronounce on marketing, bonusing and pricing matters”, bonusing usually being related the incentives to doctors to recommend certain medicines in relation to price.

Traditional medicines

As expected, the EFF and the ANC raised the question of traditional medicines and asked why there was no reference to such in the “description of medicines and products”.  On this, Ms Malebona Matsoso, DG of DoH, replied that department was fully aware of the need to incorporate traditional medicines.

She said that DoH was now distributing a booklet on the process they intended to use to regulate for traditional medicines and how DoH planned to carry out any regulations. The booklet was not available at the time but would be sent to parliamentarians, she said.

The DG, DoH, said that eventually SAHPRA would regulate all products that were processed in laboratories as well as the plants that were used during the process of making medicines. She explained that one of the main drivers for the establishment of SAHPRA was that MCC appointed members were contributors from different industries and not only public servants.

The establishment of SAHPRA therefore would be on a permanent DoH staff member basis and would deal with this as well as foodstuffs and cosmetics in terms of “products” under the Bill. Ms Matsoso confirmed again that traditional medicines and products had not been excluded under the Bill since the Bill included all products. How the regulations were to be extended to include traditional medicines was now being established, she said, and university research particularly from the University of the Western Cape and UN World findings would be used.

Animal world

Despite some objections in written submissions, DoH was insistent that veterinarians had to ensure that they were issued with licences wherever medicines were either compounded or dispensed. Also, Dr Pillay pointed out that the new Bill would not regulate for electronic-medical and radiation devices, the worry of one submission, and hence the question of the Hazardous Substances Act did not arise, he said.

In an earlier meeting with the DoH, also led by Dr Anban Pillay, the portfolio committee debated the section of the Medicines and Related Substances Amendment Bill that covered the formation and running of SAHPRA. What SAHPRA would do and the manner it would operate in the industry, he said, would be dealt with by the regulatory process to be devised.

Other articles in this category or as background
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/health/medical-food-intellectual-property-tackled/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/health/sa-allow-avoidance-medical-patents/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/health/medicines-and-related-substances-bill-now-tabled/

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EU and AGOA still important to SA, says govt

portsharboursWhite Paper on AGOA and EU trade still applies….

In describing both the need to continue trade in terms of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the importance of trade with the EU, the department of international relations and co-operation (DIRCO) said clearly some new terminology had been necessary to add to what was basically a 2012 document, the White Paper on Foreign Relations,.

DIRCO was briefing parliamentarians in the international and foreign relations portfolio committee on South Africa’s updated foreign trade policy.

New Bill from International Relations expected

New trading policies needed to be entrenched in the wording, they said, in what was clearly a roundabout way of introducing the idea of new legislation to establish a South African Council on International Relations and beef up the Consultative Forum on International Relations.

DIRCO officials talked at length on how BRICS had changed the scenario of South African foreign relations. However, positioning with the western trading world since the White Paper was first published had not changed much for South Africa, they said.    DIRCO expressed the need for continued good trade relations with the EU, which officials said was still an enormous contributor to overall trade relations with SA. They added that there remained an important need for AGOA to stay in place with the USA to beef up export figures.

Ubuntu the answer

The key concept behind all South African foreign relations was the concept of the “diplomacy of ubuntu”, they said, describing this as a policy of “collaboration, cooperation and partnership rather than conflict and competition”.

When asked by MPs as to whether DIRCO had considered the competitive nature of Nigeria and whether South Africa should really be the leader on the continent, DIRCO officials explained that South Africa’s stance was to “collaborate not compete” and this ethic applied to all relationships, particularly as far as trade was concerned. This was part of the “ubuntu” philosophy, they said.

On key foreign policies, the usual pattern as described in the White Paper were emphasized on the quest for “unity and economic, political and social renewal of Africa” but a number of times the expression “South-South solidarity” did emerge in answers.

Shift in partners

Emphasis was laid on the development of the South African Development Partnership Agency (SADPA) to pursue bilateral co-operation with international partners in support of African development but again it was noted the growth of BRICS in prominence in international affairs and the shift in global economic centre of gravity from North-West to South and East.

South Africa, DIRCO officials told parliamentarians would continue to support the development of larger markets in South Africa but Asia had become of increasing importance to South Africa, in fact Africa as a whole, with China and India increasing their global influence.

As far as the Middle East was concerned, the Levant was mentioned as providing excellent export opportunities but the area remained important in order to access sovereign wealth funds to finance infrastructure.

USA stays globally dominant

DIRCO finally acknowledged that the USA and Canada will remain dominant global and regional political and economic players with significant potential for tourism. DIRCO was conscious however of its own internal changes and policy directions on labour and civil society and incorporated this into their diplomatic training academy courses, which all appointments overseas were enrolled into.

Little could be drawn from DIRCO by MPs present on SADC, Zimbabwe and AU relationships, other than DIRCO intended stepping up its AU relationships, again with the principle of “ubuntu” at the forefront.

DIRCO said the updated 2012 White Paper on Foreign Relations is available on request.

Previous articles in this subject

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/doe-energy-overview/

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//finance-economic/intellectual-property-laws-amendment-act-law/

 

 

 

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Private Security Industry Bill gets through Parliament

Minister of Police bulldozes Private Security Industry Bill....

adtThe highly controversial Private Security Industry Regulation Amendment Bill was passed in Parliament in a surprise vote in the National Assembly, despite the assurances of many that the governing party would accede to the suggestion that the Bill was neither in the interests of a South African investment profile or from the aspect of constitutionality.

The Bill, as passed, aims to limit foreign ownership in security companies. Foreign owned private security companies would be compelled to sell 51 % of their shares to South Africans. Whether this will be challenged at constitutional level remains to be seen.

Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa told MPs earlier this was necessary in the interests of state security because “the line betweennatie mthethwa security investments and military establishments is blurred. Equally, private security companies are increasingly used in the field of intelligence”, he said. He said the need for the Bill rested entirely on this issue and the need exceeded any issue regarding possible disinvestment. He dismissed the possibility of complaints for disregard of a constitutional balance between commercial and security needs.

Threats to national security

A police “technical” team of intelligence experts reported on matters relating to foreign ownership, which had been, since the Bill was first tabled, the area hotly contested. The report read out raised the question once that despite the fact that no information could be handed out or could be reported upon, there were threats to national security and de-stabilisation of states by the private security industry which also involved intelligence activities and specific incidents.

Opposition DA shadow minister of Police, Dianne Kohler Barnard, was shocked at the vote saying that she had expected the minster to withdraw the Bill in the light of legal opinion and public sentiment.

Damaging to SA profile

She said that she had heard that as a result of the passing of the Bill, constitutional opposition had to be expected from the private sector because not only was the Bill damaging to South Africa’s profile as a country, which was supposed to be trying to encourage foreign direct investment, but that “it also reflected unclear thinking on the part of the ANC on how to treat its own marketplace.”

Minister Mthethwa seemed to exude confidence when he told parliamentarians that “the provision of security service depends on supply and demand like any commodity in the market place. Change of ownership will not change demand,” he said.   He brushed aside claims that companies would disinvest aside and said. “Indications are that when the time comes, they will comply with the law and not close down.”

tycoThe DA and the FF+ objected to and voted against the Bill on the grounds that it represented a signal to the investment world that expropriation of majority shares in a public entity by the state was possible.

The Bill, having now been passed by the National Assembly, went to the National Council of Provinces for concurrence, where public interception is not possible, and then for assent by President Zuma when it will become signed into law on a date published by gazette.
More items in this category
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Infrastructure Development Bill modified and passed

Minister responds on land issue….

ebrahim patelThe Infrastructure Development Bill recently tabled by Ebrahim Patel, minister of economic development, appears to have avoided major confrontation as a result of re-wording of the provisions it contained regarding expropriation of land for major projects, the Bill having originally granted the state the right to expropriate land where a development project, declared as a Special Infrastructure Project (SIP), was concerned.

The Bill was passed by the National assembly and recently went to the NCOP for concurrence. Recent reports indicate it was passed.

Most submissions criticising the Bill said that the new proposals completely overstepped the mark on the question of expropriation but minister Patel has now assured all parties that such expropriation, if it took place because of a SIP, would be in terms of existing legislation when it came to the acquisition of land needed.

PICC oversight will cost project

In terms of the Bill, each SIP is to have a steering committee which will put in place time frames; attempt to deal with regulatory delay challenges; address project management and ensure the coordinated issuing of permits and licences but the PICC budget for the particular SIP would have to be funded out of the departmental budgets or those of the state-owned companies responsible for managing a project.

The Bill also gives the stamp of approval to PICC, the body which has adopted the National Infrastructure Plan of 2012 that intends to “transform the SA economic landscape while simultaneously creating significant numbers of new jobs, and to strengthen the delivery of basic services by planning and developing enabling infrastructure that fosters economic growth.”

Expropriation to be as presently defined

But the Bill as introduced into Parliament overstepped the mark on the question of expropriation when it came to ensuring that a SIP became a national priority and the minister has indicated that a new cause has been drafted to make it clear that any expropriation required in terms of the strategic integrated projects will be carried out in accordance with the provisions of current legislation.

Minister Patel told parliamentarians that all thirty written submissions had been received and noted and the Infrastructure Development Bill had, as a result of these public hearings, strengthened the constitutionality of the work of PICC, reduced ambiguity on the subject of SIPs whilst ensuring that public consultation had led to transparency.

He said the Bill was important as it involved some R1-trillion on infrastructure since 2009 and the Bill in giving legal standing to the work of PICC was a “milestone in South Africa’s economic development”.

Environmental impact overlooked by Bill

Another complaint was that despite the fact that, if passed, the Bill would co-ordinate some of the biggest infrastructure projects in South Africa’s history, the provisions  make no reference to the need for infrastructure development to be environmentally sustainable other than a clause acknowledging that the SIPs will still need environmental authorisation under the National Environmental Management Act (NEMA).

South Africa has a comprehensive environmental impact assessment (EIA) regime and the department of water and environmental affairs, over the past five years, had spent time and parliamentary effort to improve, streamline and speed up EIA processes, the minimum period for such clearances going no faster than 300 days for clearance on EIAs as far as NEMA is concerned, under any circumstances, in the national interest.

The idea of PICC being allowed to reduce this environmental clearance to 250 days, or even shorter time frames for mega-projects, has the environmental world in a stir it seems, the shortening process, they say being impossible to manage to and which renders EIAs meaningless.

Environmentalists say that decisions about big projects that will affect the whole nation for generations to come must be made using comprehensive information about social and environmental impacts in compliance with NEMA and this takes time, the minimum possible being 300 days as envisaged by NEMA.

It seems that minster Patel has solved the land expropriation issue but has not satisfied the environmentalists who still complain that in its present form the Infrastructure Development Bill will not achieve its aim as far as fully integrated development in the national interest is concerned.

The Bill is headed for promulgation sometime in the mid year, and was passed before the end of the present session in an extended session of the NCOP.
Earlier articles on this subject:
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/infrastructure-development-bill-legislates-growth-path/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/gigaba-answers-critics-infrastructure-build/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//cabinetpresidential/gigaba-answers-critics-infrastructure-build/

Posted in Cabinet,Presidential, Earlier Stories, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Environmental pace hots up

Johannesburg first with environmental “green scorpions”…….

green scorpionThe City of Johannesburg has trained nine environmental management inspectors (EMIs), known as ‘green scorpions’, to ensure compliance with the city’s environmental bylaws.

Launching its Environmental Management Inspectorate made up of such persons, it was explained that this was part of the implementation of a memorandum of agreement between the city and the Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, in accordance with the National Environmental Management Act (NEMA).

Parliament passing more new laws

As far as NEMA is concerned, the portfolio committee on water and environmental affairs under Adv, “Johnnie” de Lange and the select committees in the NCOP are finalising a raft of new environmental laws to be followed by new regulations in the form of  the Marine Living Resources Amendment Bill, the: National Environmental Management Air Quality Amendment Bill, the National  Environmental Management Integrated Coastal Management Bill and the National Environmental Management Amnendment Waste Bill.

green scorpion logoIn Gauteng, the Green Scorpions will have distinctive uniforms and would, would carry official identity cards to identify themselves on official business. MMC for environment, infrastructure and services, Matshidiso Mfikoe, said that this “would ensure that Johannesburg had “none of the no-go areas created through dumping or the harbouring of dangerous substances and animals.”

She added that the safety of the people of Johannesburg could only be guaranteed when the policies of government were implemented. “This is just the beginning”, she said. “As the inspectors are taking on their responsibilities in the field, the city plans to train more to strengthen the inspectorate to give it more teeth, while creating a safe and healthy environment for ourselves and future generations”.
Previous articles on this subject
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//mining-beneficiation/tougher-rules-ensvisaged-with-new-environmental-law/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//energy/new-air-quality-act-to-deal-with-major-polluters/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za//health/air-quality-management-framework-bill-to-be-tabled-2/

 

 

Posted in Earlier Stories, Enviro,Water, Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn0 Comments

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