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Fresh Cybercrimes and Cybersecurity Bill tackles Internet fraud

…  Revised Bill criminalises cybercrimes …

posted 5 Aug… A new Bill designed to give powers to the State Security, Defence, Police and Telecommunications Ministers to intervene in many aspects of South Africa’s key economic, financial and labour environments and zeroing in on cybercrimes and related offences, is in debate.  It also calls upon the financial sector to assist in tracking down fraudsters.

Offences include the circulation of messages that aim at economic harm to persons or entities; that contain pornography or could cause mental or psychological stress; the Bill calls upon the private financial and communications sector and, more specifically, electronic service providers to assist with its objectives. The Bill will also change much in the way how government and SOEs go about their business to reflect the current call for electronic security.

The revised Bill is re-write of that originally tabled in 2015 and rejected as too convoluted and wide ranging on issues that could cause unintended consequences.

Badly needed

Despite placing considerable onus upon the private sector to assist, the IT industry seems to be guardedly welcoming the debate which is about to commence. The original and rejected Cybercrimes and Cybersecurity Bill was tabled in Parliament last February.

The main comment circulating seems to be that this later version is more specific than its earlier counterpart, provides more clarity and has less weight placed upon tedious operational management factors in state structures designed to fight cybercrime.

The Bill is the product of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Affairs (DoJ) and from what has been said, Deputy Minister John Jeffreys seems to be the state official still running with the legislation. He said at a media briefing some months ago, “This Bill will give the State the tools to halt cybercrimes and trained teams to bring to book those who use data as a tool for their crime.”

Not meant

Originally, when the Bill was tabled in 2015 it caused a storm of controversy. Whilst its objectives to catch criminals and stop the growing invasion institutional attacks were understood, unintended consequences for the media were not foreseen. The new Bill acknowledges that journalists and whistle-blowers have protection under the Protected Disclosures Act.

However, the somewhat draconian powers of seizure of data granted to the authorities will still no doubt worry many service providers insofar as interlocking the proposals into the Protection of Personal Information (POPI) Act and the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-Related Information Act (RICA) are concerned, it has been suggested in hearings.

However, the Minister and other ministerial portfolios concerned, appear to have weighted their decision upon the growing threat of international cybercrime and have continued to call for service providers to assist with the issue caused by a late start.

SA under limelight

Some IT forensic reports indicate that sub-Saharan Africa has the third highest exposure to incidents of cyber fraud in the world and according to those who published this fact, they also claim that incidences of cybercrimes and cybersecurity breaches are escalating globally at 64%, with more security incidents reported in 2015 than 2014 for South Africa.

South Africa is known to be a specific target for cybercrime involving unlawful acquisition of sensitive data relating to clients and/or business operations due to a very high reliance on internet connections by commerce. Large data storage packages proliferate in SA, it is suggested, ranging from the JSE to the banking sector.

ATMs, bank transfers

In the case again of South Africa as part of sub-Sahara Africa, wire transfer fraud accounts for 26 percent of cybercrimes, far ahead of the global average of 14 percent, South Africans being defrauded of more than R2.2bn each year it is estimated.

Banking and financial institutions in South Africa, it is noted in the preamble to the Bill, are particularly exposed, the Reserve Bank having stated back in 2016, “It would be remiss of us in our duty if we ignored the growing risks emerging from the financial services sector’s increasing reliance on cyberspace and the Internet.”

Definitions

The Bill now before Parliament criminalises unlawful and intentional conduct regarding data, data messages, computer systems and programs, networks and passwords and creates as crimes “cyber fraud, cyber forgery and cyber uttering”.

It criminalises malicious communications – namely messages that result in harm to person or property, such as revenge porn or cyber bullying. The police are given extensive investigation, search and seizure powers in the Bill and an array of penalties, including fines and imprisonment apply, including various prescribed in terms of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977.

No FICA-type warrants.

It is notable that cyber-crime powers of search and arrest remain with SAPS and not any specific structure or system set up by the new Bill to monitor instances of cybercrime or detect suspicious data attacks.

There remain, however, quite onerous obligations on electronic communications service providers and financial institutions, not only to assist in investigations of cybercrimes but also to report instances of cybercrime. A “framework of mutual co-operation between foreign states” is established in respect international investigation and the prosecution of cybercrime.

Crime fighting structures

The Cybercrimes and Cybersecurity Bill also establishes a Computer Security Incident Response Team, as did its predecessor, to establish contact with the private sector alongside with the already functional Cyber Security Hub responsible to the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Service.

Finally, on structures, the Minister of Defence is to establish and operate a Cyber Command and appoint a General Officer Commanding.

The Bill also provides for the declaration of what is termed as “critical information infrastructure possessed” by financial institutions – for example databases upon which an attack could possibly represent a national threat.    Debate will no doubt flow around who and who not should report and upon what exactly.

The crimes defined

For the technically minded, the Bill In terms of the Bill, the following activities are criminalised: unlawful securing of access to data, a computer programme, a computer data storage medium or a computer system; unlawful acquisition of data; unlawful acts in respect of software or hardware tools; unlawful interference with data or a computer programme; unlawful interference with a computer data storage medium or computer system; unlawful acquisition, possession, provision, receipt or use of password, access codes or similar data or devices.

Also included are cyber fraud; cyber forgery and uttering; cyber extortion and certain aggravating offences; attempting, conspiring, aiding, abetting, inducing, inciting, instigating, instructing, commanding or procuring to commit an offence; theft of incorporeal properties; unlawful broadcast or distribution of data messages which incites damage to property or violence; unlawful broadcast or distribution of data messages which is harmful; unlawful broadcast or distribution of data messages of intimate image without consent.

The Bill imposes a list of penalties and allows for imprisonment for up to 15 years for cybercrimes and the maximum fine that may be levied for failing to timeously report an incident or failing to preserve information is now capped at R50,000, far less than the extraordinarily high penalties for non-disclosure levied in the initial version of the Bill.

Necessary actions

The search and seizure powers granted in terms of the new Bill “do not represent increasing the state’s surveillance powers”, Deputy Minister, John Jeffries said, “But if the State cannot seize evidential material to adduce as evidence, it will be impossible to prove the guilt of an accused person.”

Any hearings will obviously focus mainly upon the onuses and impositions imposed in the Bill upon electronic communications service providers and financial institutions, known by an acronym in the Bill as “ECSPs”. A date for further parliamentary briefings by DoJ has yet to be scheduled.
Previous articles on category subject
Cybercrime and Cybersecurity Bill invokes suspicion – ParlyReportSA
Draft Cybercrime Bill drafts industry – ParlyReportSA
Lack of skills hampering broadband rollout – ParlyReportSA

 

Posted in Communications, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Barnes prepares SAPO for SASSA

Modernising SAPO a culture change

….. sent to clients 27 February…. Stage by stage, Mark Barnes, Group Chief Executive Officer of South African Post Office (SAPO), appears to be reforming cultures and cleaning out “ten years of decay”, as he put it to the Portfolio Committee on Telecommunications and Postal Services.

“The years 2017 and 2018 could be our years”, he said, “especially if the Cabinet smiles on a SASSA deal. We have the reserves to do this thing.”

Introduced by Minister Siyabonga Cwele, Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services, on the utility’s presentation on its corporate progress report and prospects for the third quarter, CEO Mark Barnes claimed that SAPO is becoming profitable; is well capitalised and the long-awaited corporatisation process is back on track with many of its labour problems sorted out.

Up and away

When introducing him to new members of the committee, the Minister said that for the last few years SAPO had been facing many challenges, but CEO Barnes, with a new Group Chief Financial Officer, “had put SAPO on the road to recovery”.

Because of its struggles with old systems of the past, digging it out of financial mismanagement and the need to pay urgently its creditors, SAPO was given a cash injection from the State.   The Minister said this was a good decision.  In 2017 SAPO was starting to focus on new businesses, with part of the strategic planning focused on the internet. One of the key goals was corporatisation, the Minister concluded.

New world

Mark Barnes described the position when he took over the reins to save the utility from “self-inflicted suicide” was far worse than was originally thought. He described a process whereby he had to send specialised “swat” teams into each major sorting complex starting with the large Johannesburg complex and eventually to other major towns and cities.

It took months, he said, to “clean up the mess and try to establish order out of chaos”, a good deal of which had been caused by the extended postal strike but mainly poor systems and management disinterest.

The delays caused by basic simple clean-up housekeeping held the initial  financial assessment back whilst the physical clean-up operations, after years of neglect were undertaken, he said.   The “swat” teams eventually established what SAPO assets had and where they were located.

First audit

He said, “I hope this is the last time I refer to ‘the past’ but we are having a mock audit in late January 2017 to establish remaining areas of wasteful expenditure, something that was not even thinkable of last year.”   He said, “The main issue is that SAPO has established an air of confidence and that confidence has reached a point where the rest of the journey becomes a worthwhile investment.”

In answer to criticism from Shadow Minister Cameron MacKenzie (DA) who said that “this SAPO report is being prefaced by the same remarks as before” and who added that it “was the same story of promises made last year but re-hashed”, CEO Barnes made a rebuttal. He retorted that “It is a mistake to take just a superficial look from the outside. Internal organization is being achieved and we haven’t had time to wave flags.”  He gave a long list of what had been achieved.

Heavyweights in saving banking

On savings, Barnes noted that SAPO serviced some 6 million customers with 2,486 outlets and reached out where no established banking services existed. “Compliance is now in place on banking procedures with the SA Reserve Bank  and we are seeking approval to establish the promised SA Postbank Limited with CIPC,  applications being submitted before July 1 2017.”

Postbank’s depositor funds were now standing at R4.9bn, having increased by 128m. Postbank itself had invested R7.3bn, he said.  Payables, Barnes also said, were reduced by R531m and the group met liquidity and solvency standards. The Post Office is backed by a R4.2bn Treasury guarantee.

 An overdraft of R270m had been repaid and R17m had been realized from the sale of pointless property holdings. Rental from existing tenants had increased and a more suitable and less expensive head office was now being targeted. He said he was always trying to get officials out of their old mindset about SAPO and to realize they were in business.

Major cut backs

On the labour front, there were 18,000 less staff this year, Barnes said, “brought about by a process of natural attrition” and it was hoped to transfer a large portion of a “hopelessly overstaffed head office” to operational duties.

If operational revenue failed to provide the necessary improved results in the short term, he said, then a retrenchment programme may have to be negotiated. “It will be tough but that’s how it is. The unions are aware of the long-term planning processes that have been undertaken and the alternatives understood”, he said.

SASSA a target

CEO Barnes expanded on the possibility of SAPO handling all payments of SASSA grants in the light of the volumes of “points of presence which amounted”, he repeated, “to approximately 5,000 counter points  Postbank is also to make an application to government to both handle all government mail business and a submission to SASSA in the very near future as current hiatus evolves.

He said that they had been talking to National Treasury on the savings to the national fiscus that could be gained. It was agreed that it would take much to achieve this possibility but was highly “do-able”.

He said Postbank had sufficient funds of its own to capitalize such a venture with IT networks and training should the security of such a contract be awarded. He commented that ordinary mail had dropped to 50% of original volumes due to the advent of electronic mail.

“This sea change in the way that the world now communicates had found the original management of SAPO completely at a loss on what to do”, he said, “and the decision had  apparently been to do nothing.”

Diversification from snail mail

The plan was now to diversify into courier services probably with a partner and to focus on selling Postbank services at package rates to corporate business.  

So far, four offer attempts had been made to “buy in” as partners, CEO Barnes said, all four of which had been found totally unacceptable.  There had been an obvious attempt in all cases just to acquire Postbank’s extensive national footprint as if a possible merger of interests was a fire sale, in each case contenders having given no consideration to the idea of what “was in it” as a revenue source to Postbank.   All propositions were  rejected out of hand.

Barnes told Parliamentarians, with the Minister still present at the portfolio committee meeting, that e-commerce in the form of public hubs or malls to the SADC area as well as locally will become a major revenue base for SAPO especially in lower income groups.

Generally, on all fronts, 22 significant projects had been approved, CEO Barnes said, with a further 9 in the project stage; 4 projects were in the procurement stage and others in testing and feasibility stages.

Transport more agile

As far as the transport book was concerned, SAPO  had decreased its annual expenditure   by 30% by exercising rationality and purchasing new vehicles cutting down on maintenance and repairs to old vehicles, Savings were also achieved by boosting efficiency with “a more agile logistics mind-set.”

The overall corporate plan forecast is mixed, Barnes said, and whilst revenue has declined significantly on a net basis, which was expected and planned for whilst SAPO re-grouped and cut out unprofitable exercises, it will still meet its corporate plan targets and “looked headed to be back into the black by a small amount in 2016/7”, said Barnes.

When it came to the balance sheet, he remarked SAPO still has an extremely large amount of debt which needs to be paid. However, it was important to note that the entity was now solvent and could pay. It also had liquidity in cash of its own available for development.

The big plan

He told the Committee that the key to SAPO’s future was the corporatisation of the Post Bank, with approval to establish the bank being granted by the SA Reserve Bank in July 2016. Preparations were currently underway to submit for registration in February 2017 as a South African Postbank Limited entity with CIPC.

The Postbank staff, operations and balance sheet will transfer from the Postbank division to the new entity after the incorporation process. The Postbank will allow for broader financial inclusion for all South Africans and it has the capacity to do this, he said.

SAPO, he said, had a relatively sophisticated E-commerce infrastructure with a large footprint which allowed it to facilitate speedy connections and deliveries. This, combined with the ports, vehicles and the access SAPO has at airports could make SAPO the E-commerce hub for Africa.

Ms M Shinn (DA) asked whether anything had been done address the security of IT systems and whether SAPO had the money to recruit and retain cyber-security skills. Cameron MacKenzie asked for more information on the SASSA bid.

Biometrics needed

Outsourcing was now underway and tenders being called for on biometrics, CEO Barnes said, which was the only route to stop fraud, duplicated payments to persons claiming or withdrawing twice under different names; to follow world trends and to get SAPO into the future to serve the nation as it should. Such was necessary if they were to handle the SASSA account which would be a great achievement and was the correct thing to do.

He said that partnerships in the IT sector were very likely to be sought as well as outsourcing, as SAPO, given its size and history, was not going to be able to keep up with the latest developments in the IT sector, nor would SAPO wish to be that expert, he said. Their focus was to get into courier work and banking, not IT. So, partnerships were going to be needed on the right terms.
He said that there had been half-expected problems with the data centre and disaster recovery this year as new equipment was being added to old. Repairs had been undertaken and there were negotiations underway to outsource the work of the data centre.

CEO Barnes said motor vehicles licence renewal processing was up by about R7m transactions in the year but this figure was coming from a very low base.

Money, money, money

In response to the question of when was SAPO likely to return to profitability, he re-confirmed that SAPO expects to start trading profitably during the 2018 financial year.

On complaints from the DA that SAPO still needed help from Treasury, Barnes explained that it was the nature of a turnaround situation not use cash in hand for the wrong things. Working money was one thing but depositor’s funds and reserves were a completely different issue, he said, and these were the security needed for developmental issues to get SAPO off the starting block.

He said whilst corporates have replaced SAPO with other service providers, they are a lot more expensive to hire. “SAPO is a low-cost producer and the only reason people turned to the alternatives is because SAPO became a dysfunctional low cost producer.”
“This is changing”, he said, “and we have to change the corporate customer mindset to show that we can do things again”.
Previous articles on category subject

SAPO – one big bungle at taxpayer’s cost – ParlyReportSA

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Cybercrime and Cybersecurity Bill invokes suspicion

Cybercrime Bill stated as invasive

…sent to clients 28 Jan…   A new law to assist in enforcing South Africa’s fight against cybercrime, hacking and unlawful interception of data is about to be tabled in Parliament. As expected, the proposals are not without considerable misgivings in the private sector and involve claims that the state may have designs upon the control of free speech and/or are intent upon the control or manipulation of cyberspace.

The draft Cybercrime and Cybersecurity Bill (C&C Bill) has now been approved by Cabinet, the draft having been published for comment as far back as September 2015.  Industry players are deeply involved and the next platform for their involvement moves to the actual wording of the document that will form the basis for regulations.

Agents for the state

The legislation states that the proposals are designed to give powers to the State Security, Defence, Police and Telecommunications Ministers, which powers will not only extend into many aspects of South Africa’s key economic, financial and labour environments but will impose responsibilities on service providers.

The Bill clearly states it will call upon the private sector for compliance into order to meet its objectives and will also change the way the public service goes about its business to reflect the call for security.  Cross hairs are to zero in on the criminalisation of cyber-facilitated offenses including circulation of messages aimed at economic harm, contain pornography or could cause mental or psychological harm.

Parliamentary stage

The next stage of public sector involvement will be extensive parliamentary hearings, no doubt involving joint portfolio committees, to cover the many aspects involved.  Also to allow for further submissions on deep concerns in the private sector regarding compliance and intrusion of free speech rights.

The long and quite complicated process of drafting such legislation has been undertaken by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development.  It is stated that the proposals are of an umbrella approach towards legislation already in the ambit of the new Bill, the objective of which is to extend any new regulations over a wide range of business endeavours and activities “in the public interest”.

Long history

The process started at a point in the cybercrime history log which seems a century ago.  A government gazette articulated what was necessary. “I, Mbangiseni David Mahlobo, Minister of State Security, hereby publish the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework as approved by Cabinet in March 2012 for public information.”

The long journey has finally resulted in a 130-page draft which firstly creates offences, prescribes penalties and regulates for powers to investigate, gain access, search and seize items. It gives such powers to the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the State Security Agency (SSA).

Future structures

The Bill then proposes that structurally the Minister of Police establish both a National Cybercrime Centre and appoint a director in charge – a person currently serving with the SSA – and similarly appoint such a director in charge for a “point of contact centre” for cybercrime activity, outreach and contact.

Monitoring all structures will be a Cyber Response Committee (CRC) made up of 13 experienced persons chaired by the DG, Dept. of State Security.

Any interventions at this level will be, by nature of the vastly changing business environment and the global challenge of the subject matter of the Bill, “which will form the critical point of balance between the forces of state control and public endeavour”.

Ground troops

Initially, the Minister of State Security is to appoint a director in charge of a proposed Cyber Security Centre, such person also serving with SSA and for the Minister to establish Government Security Incident Response teams, also appointing a person from the State Security Agency as the head of each specialised investigating team.

Finally, on structures, the Minister of Defence is to establish and operate a Cyber Command and appoint a General Officer Commanding.

Furthermore, provision in the Bill is made for the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services to establish and operate a Cyber Security Hub and appoint a director of same. It is in this area that assumedly the main interface between private and public sectors will take place.

Key points

An example of a database to be protected is given in the Bill as the Home Affairs database and the mandate for dealing with cybercrime clearly includes the fact that foreign states and South Africa will be co-operating to investigate possible offences.

Also, powers are granted to the President who may enter agreements with foreign states to promote cybersecurity. The proposals make it quite clear that international crime fighting and the local protection of cyberspace are to be woven together. This will involve changes to the anchor Electronic Communications and Transactions Act, particularly where the Act deals with attempts to deal with abuse of information systems.

The nitty gritty

Where the C&C Bill ventures into the private sector there will no doubt be, and certainly has been to date, plenty of debate.  The Bill as proposed, broadly and perhaps too grandly, allows for the imposition of obligations on electronic communications service providers (ECSPs) and financial institutions in respect of aspects “which may impact on cybersecurity”.

The difference between obligations and compliance seems a fine line but already the Dept. of Telecommunications has set up a website on https://www.cybersecurityhub.gov.za/ to try and clarify issues.

At what point?

The general obligations of ECSPs are a set out in the draft bill but an obligation is proposed that as soon as a ECSP “becomes aware of an offence being committed on its network”, the matter must be declared to the National Cybercrime Centre.

The offences are enumerated in the Bill but it is possible that clarity is required, according to stakeholders who have voiced opinions so far, as to who decides at and at what level the retention of a suspicion becomes an offence or to restate the problem, at what point does a suspicion become a reportable fact.

Proposed offences include unlawful interception of data; unlawful access, personal information and financial information-related offences; unlawful acts in respect of software or hardware tools; unlawful acts in respect of malware; unlawful acquisition, possession, provision, receipt or use of passwords, access codes or similar data or devices; computer-related fraud and computer-related extortion.

Extensive powers

Most focus on the fact that the Bill’s clause 58 gives the State Security Minister powers to determine what should be included in a “national critical information infrastructure”.

The Bill goes on to state that should it “appear” to the Minister that any information presented is of such “strategic nature” that any interferences, loss, damage, immobilisation or disruption which may result in prejudice to the “security, defence, law enforcement or international relations of South Africa; or prejudice the health and safety of the public; interfere or disrupt any essential service’, then the Minister may implement the powers granted by the Bill.

The “Apple” problem

Broadly speaking, also included is any malevolent act which “causes any major economic loss, destabilises the economy of South Africa or creates any form of public emergency’’ with the proviso that the organisation must “at its own cost take steps to the satisfaction of the Cabinet minister” to comply with a state request.

Any “affected organisation may be given the right to be afforded an opportunity to make representation” but, to repeat, players in the industry note that a great amount of responsibility has been delegated without clear definitions of what is reportable.

The background

The seriousness of the Bill and the recognition that cybercrime must be dealt with firmly is measured by the background given to the Bill.    It is estimated that cyber-related offences currently exceed a value of more than R1bn annually. This is escalating at speed, the Department of Justice states.

In general terms, one of the tasks of the Cybercrime Centre is stated in the revised draft as informing all of cybercrime trends and creating an environment which enables parties to report cybercrime without being suspected of whistle-blowing with the accompanying commercial disadvantages.

In other words, the fear with the original draft expressed by the Right2Know campaign that the draconian powers of seizure worried many in the IT industry and that lack of protection for whistle blowers was out of kilter with free speech requirements, may have to some extent been responded to.

Heavy hand of the law

Still, fines of up to R10m and/or 10 years’ imprisonment are involved following a guilty verdict for unlawfully accessing or intercepting “a national critical information infrastructure” involving “critical data”, which makes for a tricky scenario for ECSPs handling traffic and journalists handling information.

This is in the light that an ECSP could be liable on conviction to a fine of R10 000 for each day on which such failure to comply with disclosure requirements continues, it was noted.    To be specific, some fifty offences are detailed in the areas of data, messages, computers, and networks.

This is serious talk.   Whilst national cybersecurity needs are recognised as paramount, as the latest draft explains, the extent of state powers in the hands of uncontrolled and misdirected state effort gives concern to many in the ECSP business community, particularly in the light of the public nature of the internet.

No warrantless searches

On the other hand, whilst the C&C Bill gives SAPS and SSA extensive powers to investigate, search, access and seize assets wherever they might be located, the search powers granted are not emanating from the proposed Bill.

Search powers are only possible provided the search entity has a search warrant granted in the normal way, the department says.  SSA will be purely looking, they say, for data that has a feature of malevolence and commits crime in terms of the need to protect the State and its citizens.

At a briefing for the media, the Justice and Constitutional Development Department in Pretoria Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development, John Jeffery, gave a further assurance that what is about to arrive in Cape Town “will not give any powers to the State Security Agency (SSA) to control the internet or spy on local users”.

Criminal data

The search and seizure powers granted in terms of the latest draft of the C&C Bill around the interception of data “do not represent increasing the state’s surveillance powers”, the Minister said.

“As part of the final draft of the bill, it says that to prove an offence in a court of law, data must be seized as evidential material.  If the State cannot seize evidential material to adduce as evidence, it is impossible to prove the guilt of an accused person. “

The criminal procedure act is currently used to investigate cybercrimes, Minister Jeffery said, and to this end the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-Related Information Act (RICA) “are already in the tool box”.

Anchor still RICA

The C&C Bill is merely extending the RICA from that aspect, he said, which already has basic general principles in place to protect persons against unlawful interception of communications. “There is thus no extension of the so-called ‘surveillance powers’ of the State”, he added.

He confirmed that previous versions of the Bill, whilst stating a person who fell foul on the issue of state information that was classified as secret could go to jail for 10 years without the possibility of a fine, now, the final draft of the Bill acknowledges that journalists and whistle-blowers have protection under the Protected Disclosures Act.

Minister Jeffrey said was satisfied that the C&C Bill, now headed towards its final shape, gives the State the tools to halt crime and bring those who used data as a tool of crime to book.

 Defining data

He concluded, “Data is merely a means to commit offences such as fraud, damage of programmes and computer systems, extortion, forgery and uttering. It can also be used to commit murder by remotely switching of a respiratory system or terrorism by overloading the centrifuges of a nuclear station or remotely opening the sluices of a dam which causes large scale flooding.”

Much of what will come up in the parliamentary hearings of submissions will most likely involve the space occupied by the ECSPs and their responsibilities as perceived by the State. Furthermore, the role to be played by any business institution using large amounts of data needs to be clarified as far as areas of compliance are concerned.

Previous articles on category subject

Draft Cybercrime Bill drafts industry – ParlyReportSA

South Africa on international cybersecurity – ParlyReportSA

Broadband allocation could involve SABC – ParlyReportSA

Posted in Communications, LinkedIn, Security,police,defence, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Lack of skills hampering broadband rollout

Broadband for SA needs local tech….

computerSchoolThe lack of IT skills in broadband development in government, especially those responsible for implementation of the new broadband policy in SA as well as technicians in the field, has become a major issue of debate in Parliament recently.

The department of telecommunications and postal services (DTPS) has increased it spend in consultancy services by nearly 400% in the last year according to its presentation documents to the relevant parliamentary portfolio committee.

Also, once again the rationale behind the splitting of the department of telecommunications and postal services (DTPS) away from the department of communications (DOC) was queried in Parliament as “not being in line with world trends” causing delays in implementation plans.

DTPS in long terms will benefit

Both these issues were responded to by the responsible minister, Dr Siyabonga Cwele, who was in attendance when DTPS presented their strategic and annual performance plans to the relevant portfolio committee.

Dr Cwele said that he was far happier to leave DOC concentrating on matters surrounding the SABC and migration to digital TV, leaving his department (DTPS) to pursue the objective of uplifting South Africa into the world of broadband.

Broadband will help all

This objective also fitted into the plan to re-model and reassess what was expected from the South African Post Office (SAPO) and for government to decide, like many other countries had done, where postal services fitted in and how to consolidate on the valuable rural outreach of SAPO in respect of other services required by poorer sections of the community.

What was clearly missing during the meeting was, according to parliamentarians, exact timelines for broadband introduction to schools, health services, government departments and state owned utilities, Dr Cwele being quite clear that DTPS had been mandated to ensure that affordable broadband was available.

Staff needed to do the job

Dr Cwele acknowledged, however, that DTPS was greatly under qualified to achieve this due to lack of technical skills and the department did not have enough capacity to deliver on its mandate, as this was a very technical sector of public services. It was too early to commit to timelines but at this stage they had to build the staff complement to do the job, he noted.

He said that DTPS had to bring highly skilled young people into the organisation considering the internet revolution and the growing need for national broadband services. “We need skills not expensive managers”, he added.

Technicians not paper creators

It was explained, in general, broadband refers to telecommunication in which a wide band of frequencies is available to transmit information at greatly increased speed, the installation of which should bring costs down, South Africa having some of the highest communication cost factors in the world.

Ms Rosey Sekese, DG, DTPS, in presenting her strategic plan, said her immediate  priorities were:

• broadband connectivity focused on radio frequency spectrum
• cyber security
• the cost to communicate
• an Information Communication Technology (ICT) policy review
• a national e-strategy
• a turnaround plan for SAPO

The total budget allocation for the Department was R1.4 billion, a reduction from R2 billion in the previous financial year.

Opposition members wanted to know the criteria that DTPS had used to choose Telkom as the leading agency in the rollout of broadband and whether this was fair competition.

Also, they asked why DTPS had emphasised the roll-out of e-governance in the public service to meet NDP targets as first objective. Rather, they said, the focus should have been on business and industry, the ICT sector in the commerce and industry sectors needing this and who played a far greater role in economic development and job creation.

Telkom has to lead in this..

TelkomMinister Cwele responded that the selection of Telkom as the leading agency in the rollout of broadband was as a result of Telkom having the largest terrestrial fibre network and was also based on cost, as this was a state owned entity.

On business and industry needs, he also said DTPS needed to find a way to work with the private sector that could improve economic growth and he, the deputy minister and the DG had been in constant engagement with the private sector as it was realised that this was essential.

The department would also work together with the department of trade and industry and the department of small business development to create incentives for investment in SMMEs, as they realised that many small companies had been marginalised by slow internet services and limited access to the many international IT developments taking place and additional sea cable services.

Creating certainty

He added that he was perfectly aware of the challenges in the finalisation of a spectrum policy to internetcreate a smooth path for the regulators and he was also aware of the need to create certainty in the telecommunications industry. He acknowledged that DTPS was following closely the experiences of the Western Cape and Gauteng broadband rollout plans.

The minister promised that all critical posts within DTPS would be filled within the next three months. However, opposition members continued to draw attention to the question of the general IT skills shortage and said it was yet another “crisis about to happen”.

DA’s Gordon Mackenzie noted “a dramatic increase in outsourced services from R52.5m in 2014 to R230m in 2015” and said this route only added to the high cost of communications in South Africa.

Other articles in this category or as background
Overhaul of broadband policy underway – ParlyReportSA
Parliament gets final dates for digital TV – ParlyReportSA
More state powers for ICASA proposed – ParlyReportSA

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SA needs 3 languages not 13, CSIR says

New minimal language policy proposed by CSIR

signpostThe Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) says that 77% of South Africans can understand each other in three of the main languages. They have, as a result, proposed that a language policy which recommends English, isiZulu and Sepedi as official languages, be adopted. A draft new language policy has been published in the government gazette for public comment which minimalizes ten of South Africa’s current official languages.

The proposal, however, makes it clear that it also recommends that a policy should be adopted for use of information in additional languages in areas where there is “a regional footprint” and “as far as is practical and reasonable” to respond to requests and communications sent in languages other than the official three.

Sepedi

The organisation says the selection of its three official languages was based on “maximum reach through the principle of mutually intelligible languages”. Sepedi is one of many dialects of the Sotho people, known as Northern Sotho or Sesotho sa Leboa, from whence the homeland name of Lebowa was drawn, and is mostly spoken in the Northern Province of South Africa.     Around  3.7 million people in South Africa use it as their home language, it is reported, and Sepedi is the most common language spoken in the heart of the industrial South Africa, which also has largest residential area.

English

Meanwhile, English is the most common language in schoolbooks. It also the most common “lingua franca” of  trading partners in North America, the Australasias, India, and to a great extent in Africa and Europe, all of which are major trading partners of South Africa. All government correspondence in South Africa has now switched to English as first choice, as does business and commerce by default, which fact is probably related to the fact that this is first choice of the JSE and the IT industry worldwide.

Zulu

IsiZulu, also known as Zulu, is understood by people from the Cape to Zimbabwe and reported to be understood by some 10 million persons.   Zulus are part of the Nguni group of people, taking their name from the chief who founded the royal line in the 16th century.   King Shaka raised the tribe to prominence in the early 19th century, from whom the current dynasty is founded. Over 95% of those who speak isiZulu live in South Africa, meaning that 24% of the population can speak this language, dwarfing other languages except English.

Zulu is the most widely spoken home language in South Africa, rated as understood by 24% of the population, with about 10 million speakers – the vast majority of whom live in South Africa.

Not included

Notable is the fact that both Afrikaans (the language of the political base prior to 1994 and the cause of outbreaks of violence when the language was named as first choice for schools throughout South Africa) and Xhosa (the language of the political base after 1994), are not included.

Neither is Tswana mentioned, one of current eleven official languages in South Africa, which is spoken by a larger number of people actually living in South Africa and not in Botswana, the home of the language. Other articles in this category or as background http://parlyreportsa.co.za/trade-industry/nema-waste-ask-parliamentarians/

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