New Competition Bill invades business principles

 

Competition kill is not transformation, say critics

Due to an idealogical theme imposed by the Minister of Economic Development, Ebrahim Patel, on the new Competition Amendment Bill, recently published for comment, South Africa can expect a highly charged series of hearings following the Bill’s recent tabling in Parliament. Competition Bill

 

Posted in BEE, Finance, economic, Labour, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Competition Commission gets to know LPG market

 DOE holds off on LPG regulatory changes…

Sent to clients 25 Oct….In a briefing to the Portfolio Committee on Energy on the report by the Competition Commission (CC) into the Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) sector, acting Director General of the Department of Energy (DOE), Tseliso Maqubela, has again told Parliament that the long-standing LPG supply shortages are likely to continue for the present moment until new import infrastructure facilities come on line.

He was responding to the conclusions reached by the CC but reminded parliamentarians at the outset of the meeting that the Commission’s report was not an investigation into anti-competitive behaviour on the part of suppliers but an inquiry, the first ever conducted by the CC, into factors surrounding LPG market conditions.

Terms of reference

In their general comments, the Commissioner observed that the inquiry commenced August 2014 on the basis that as there were concerns that structural features in the market made it difficult for new entrants and the high switching costs for LPG gas distributors mitigated against change in the immediate future.

They worked on the basis that there are five major refineries operating in South Africa, these being ENREF in Durban, (Engen);

refinery

engen durban refinery

SAPREF in Durban, (Shell and BP); Sasol at Secunda; PetroSA at Mossel Bay; and CHEVREF in Cape Town (Chevron). There are four wholesalers, namely Afrox, Oryx, Easigas and Totalgaz.

Wholesalers different

As far the wholesalers are concerned, in the light of all being foreign controlled, CC also observed that transformation was poor, but this was not an issue on their task list, they said. They had assumed therefore that BEE legislation was difficult to enforce and that the issue had been reported to the Department of Economic Development, the portfolio committee was told.

Price regulation at the refineries and at retail level is supposedly determined by factors meant to protect consumers, the CC said, but their inquiry report noted no such regulations specifically at wholesale level. This fact was stated as being of concern to the CC in the light of known “massive profits in the LPG wholesaling sector”.

Structures

Commissioner Bonakele said, “We started the inquiry because of the worrying structures of the market but in benchmarking our market structures with other countries and we found LPG in SA was not only unusually expensive but was indeed in short supply. Why? When it is so badly needed, was the question, he said

The CC established from the industry that about 15% of LPG supplied is used by householders and the balance is for industrial use.   In general, they noted that there were regulatory gaps also in the refining industry but regulatory requirements were over-burdening they felt and contained many conflicts and anomalies.

The CC had also reported that the maximum refinery gate price (MRGP) to wholesalers and the maximum retail price (MRP) to consumers were not regulated sufficiently and far too infrequently by DOE.

Contentious

There needed to be one entity only regulating the entire industry from import to sale by small warehousing/retailers, they said. The CC suggested in their report that the regulatory body handling all aspects of licensing should be NERSA .

As far as gas cylinders were concerned, Commissioner Bonakele noted in their report that there are numerous problems but their criticism was that the system currently used was not designed to assist the small entrant. The “hybrid” system that had evolved seemed to work but there was a “one price for all” approach.

DOE replies

In response, DG Maqubela confirmed that the inquiry had been conducted with the full co-operation of DOE into an industry beset with supply and distribution problems, issues that were only likely to change when there were “adequate import and storage facilities which allowed for the import of economic parcels of LPG supplied to the SA marketplace.”

When asked why local refineries could not “up” their supply of LPG to meet demand, DG Maqubela explained that only 5% of every barrel of oil refined by the industry into petroleum products could be extracted in the form of LPG. Therefore, the increase in LPG gas supplied would be totally disproportionate to South Africa’s petrol and diesel requirements.

Going bigger

Tseliso Maqubela, previously DG of DOE’s Petroleum Products division, told the Committee that two import terminal facilities have recently been commissioned in Saldanha and two more are to be built, one at Coega (2019) and one at Richards Bay (2021). These facilities were geared to the importation of LPG on a large scale.

He said, in answer to questions on legislation on fuel supplies, that DOE were unlikely to carry out any amendments in the immediate future to the Petroleum Pipelines Act, since the whole industry was in flux with developments “down the road”.
It would be better to completely re-write the Act, he said, when the new factors were ready to be instituted.

Rules

On the regulatory environment, DG Maqubela pointed out that for a new refinery investor it would take at least four years to get through paper work through from design approval to when the first spade hit the soil. This had to change. The integration of the requirements of the Department of Environmental Affairs, Transnet, the Transnet Port Authority, DTI, Department of Labour, Cabinet and NERSA and associated interested entities into one process was essential, he said.

On licencing, whilst DOE would prefer it was not NERSA, since they should maintain their independence, in principle the DOE, Maqubela said, supported the view that all should start considering the de-regulation of LPG pricing. He agreed that DOE had to shortly prepare a paper in on gas cylinder pricing and deposits which reflected more possibilities for new starters.

MPs had had many questions to ask on the complicated issues surrounding the supply, manufacture, deposit arrangements, safety and application of cylinders. In the process of this discussion, it emerged, once again, that LPG was not the core business of the refinery industry and what was supplied was mainly for industrial use. The much smaller amount for domestic use met in the main by imported supplies for which coastal storage was underway over a five-year period.

Refining

DG Maqubela noted that on Long Term Agreements (LTAs) between refineries and suppliers, DOE in principle agreed with the Commission that LTAs between refiners and wholesalers could be reduced from 25 years to 10 years, to accommodate small players. Again, he said, this would take some time to be addressed, as was also an existing suggestion of a preferential access of 10% for smaller players.

All in all, DG Maqubela seemed to be saying that whilst many of the CC recommendations were valid, nobody should put “the cart before the horse” with too much implementation of major change in the LPG industry before current storage and supply projects were completed.

However, the current cylinder exchange practice must now be studied by DOE and answers found, Tseliso Maqubela re-confirmed.
Previous articles on category subject
Overall energy strategy still not there – ParlyReportSA
Gas undoubtedly on energy back burner – ParlyReportSA
Competition Commission turns to LP gas market – ParlyReportSA

Posted in BEE, Energy, Finance, economic, Fuel,oil,renewables, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

25.1% is maximum BEE control, says DTI

DTI upbeat on implementation of BEE codes…..

lionel october 3

In a report to Parliament on the amended BEE Codes of Practice and their implementation as from 1 May 2015, Lionel October, Director General of Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and his B-BBEE staff team, emphasised that the generic scorecard was aligned to government’s key priorities. He also said the State had no ambitions to take their target on black control beyond 25.1% of ownership.

Supplier Development is new title

DG October said the main emphasis of the codes had now switched to greater emphasis on what was previously termed procurement – now referred to as “supplier development”. This approach was more in alignment with the National Development Plan (NDP) objectives, DG October said, simply because that was the main direction needed to empower the development of black enterprises and build the economy on a stable growth path.

“In fact the German auto industry working with the German Chamber of Commerce had established a fund

BMW-Werk Südafrika

in South Africa”, he said, “for financing, training and building expertise in black businesses to supply the auto industry”.

There was considerable discussion on this by members and DG October said that there had been a general recognition in business and industry of the word “must” had replaced “may” in terms of B-BBEE requirements; that level four had to be reached for incentives and in general now “certainty” had been restored to the business environment on BEE issues, he felt.

Five “Elements”

The generic scorecard now had five elements, he said, which all companies, except those micro-exempted, had to comply with for recognition. All employment equity and management control had now been merged into one of those elements, now termed “management control”.    Sector codes were now to be aligned by 1 Nov. 2015, as set out in Code 003.

He said that “in response to public submissions” the import exclusion principle would be maintained and that the definition of an “empowering supplier” in the context of code alignment was a compliant entity which could demonstrate that its production and/or value adding activities were taking place in this country.”

DTI said that that “deviations of sector codes in terms of targets must be over and above those of generic codes and companies that derive more than 50% of revenue from sectors where there is already a sector code must be measured in terms of that sector code.”

DTI has no doubtful intentions

George Washington, having cut down the cherry tree, with his fatherIn general, DG October said in response to questions from MPs about the amendments, it had been his impression that business seemed to accept there were no political mala fides on the part of DTI; just a wish to get on with the planned NDP growth path which required the co-operation of business and industry on black empowerment.

The funding of Sector Charter Councils was a “joint responsibility between government and the private sector and entities must report annually on their B-BBEE status to sector council who will in return reports to the BEE Commission”, DTI said.

New sectors in the sights

Sector codes were being considered for the tourism, which had reached the stage of gazetting for public comment; “alignment” was being reached in the construction, integrated transport, ICT, financial services and chartered accountancy sectors; the property and forestry sectors had reached gazetting stages and marketing, advertising and communication were with their appropriate ministries for approval.

DG October mentioned the fact that the manufacturing industry stood alone as there were so many different sectors but over a period, aspects would be dealt with such as the film industry and textile and clothing industry.

DTI concluded their input to the meeting by advising that a technical assistance guide to B-BBEE was in process and DTI were in the process of finalising the B-BBEE verification manual.

Recent faux pas

rob davies2Opposition members asked how it was that DTI went so wrong with the question of  downgrading the pointing system for employment schemes and why it was that the Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Rob Davies, had to retract that portion of the amendments which were not gazetted for public comment.

Chairperson Joan Fubbs intervened at this point, noting the Minister had taken the blame, had apologised for the mistake and could do no more than admit that DTI had been wrong.

DG October added that at a DTI workshop on the subject with “some stakeholders” this direction had been considered as a good option for broader rather than narrow empowerment but it had now been recognised by DTI that “they had gone down the wrong route as far as investor confidence was concerned”.

DTI had now reversed everything with the promise that this would not occur on the agenda again.

Better ideas could come

It had also been realised that such a move could also destroy imaginative plans for black management control such as that pitched by Standard Bank where 40% shareholding went to staff who could have representation on the board; 40% went to recognised BEE shareholders and 20% went into community organisations and trusts.

In answer to direct questioning by MPs, DG October confirmed that by the term “black”, DTI translatedlionel october this as African, Coloured, Indian and Chinese. He also confirmed that all these groups, if foreign and not South African citizens, were excluded.

More than 25.1% “unrealistic”

DG October, when asked by ANC MPs whether the 25.1% target for black ownership was realistic and fair considering that the demographics in South Africa demonstrated a far larger proportion of black people, he said that 25.1% could be considered as a “basic critical mass to engender a solid forward movement”.  To go any further would be unrealistic, he added.

In Malaysia, he said, local ownership was considered fair at 30% and other African countries as high as 50%, but he felt that in South Africa, where the need for the transfer of skills and training from large to small companies, especially through supplier development by state utilities and large businesses, was essential, this was a fair percentage assumption and which called for co-operation and fairness between all parties, all bearing in mind “a pretty hideous past”.

Redress of the past in all preambles

joan fubbsAt this point, Chairperson Joan Fubbs referred to the South African Constitution, reading out the clauses which not only stated that all were equal despite race colour or creed but that discrimination was possible if it was fair and she reminded MPs that redress of the past was “fair”.

She asked for all “not to isolate clauses in the Codes to determine personalised interests but get on with job of re-aligning communities that had been excluded from ownership for over 300 years”.

One ANC MP asked that the focus on big businesses be less emphasised and that DTI rather spent considerably more time with the job of developing ownership of black small business, which he stated could be “the power house of South Africa”.

He called for legislation that enforced government and public utilities, “as custodians of state power” to set an example on supplier development since, he said, one could hardly expect the private sector to follow suit, if the SOEs did not lead the way on this issue.

Incentives needed, not law says DTI

DG October said such sort of things were “impractical in the real world” and said the main challenge was a phased process of change which now had the support of many in positions of power in business. He also emphasised that B-BBEE had to tie in business and industry with incentives rather than with the law.

When asked about his recent public statement that he had set DTI’s target to produce “100 black industrialists”, he was referring rather to 100 black industrial leaders “financed and supported by DTI initiatives”.

Other articles in this category or as background
BEE comes under media scrutiny – ParlyReportSA
Rumblings in labour circles on BEE – ParlyReport
B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice far more onerous – ParlyReportSA
One year to implement B-BBEE Codes – ParlyReportSA

Posted in BEE, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, LinkedIn, Special Recent Posts, Trade & Industry0 Comments

DTI does flip flop on BEE codes

B-BBEE codes changed on “management control”…

Rob+DaviesA  lack of understanding of the effect of B-BBEE Codes on business and the industrial environment, despite a workshop on the subject, was demonstrated when the department of trade and industry (DTI) amended its own amendment in a matter of days on the point scoring issue in terms of broad- based employment share ownership schemes.

More emphasis has been placed in the Codes generally on procurement from black business, now referred to as “supplier development”.

As you were…

However, the minister of trade and industry, Dr Rob Davies, confirmed in a statement that the second amendment corrected the changes as far as employment schemes were concerned and any such changes would not be retrospective on deals already done, such earlier deals continuing to reap the same benefits under B-BBEE Code pointing as before.

Control is everything

Minister Davies said that DTI still had a think tank operating on how further to make BEE in generalplan BEE more effective insofar as pressure on business was concerned to effectively ensure that management, control and ownership by black persons was increased.  His task team appointed would report back by the end of the month. He repeated this in his budget vote speech.

DTI completely avoided established government procedure by issuing an “explanatory notice” to a gazetted publication on B-BBEE procedures by announcing a completely new aspect on the rules on B-BBEE award-pointing, in this case termed as “amending guidelines”, thus avoiding the issue of public comment.

Most worrying was the fact that minister Rob Davies failed to make any reference to this in his earlier introduction to DTI’s strategic plan to Parliament a week before, subsequently presented to the portfolio committee on trade and industry by DG Lionel October and then to the select committee on economic affairs in the NCOP.

Forgot the union movement

Just as as business leaders were, so was the trade union movement, many of whose members are part of share employment schemes, options or not, and are therefore touched on the issue of reduced profit and dividends.

As far as not mentioning this in a budget vote speech, which was an excellent opportunity to inform business, there is fine line, say opposition members, between failure to disclose to Parliament and avoiding a contentious disclosure to Parliament that that might compromise a negotiation but in this particular case of changes to B-BBEE, the matter  appears to have only involved some members of cabinet and certainly none of the large spectrum of stakeholders involved. It all came as a big surprise.

The minister has published two further notices on the amended B-BBEE Codes regarding the second phase now implemented. The Chamber of Mines was yet another body caught by complete surprise, thinking that their relationships, in this case the minister of mineral resources, were far better than they actually now seem to be. There seemed to be a vacuum in communications.

DTI has now reported to Parliament on subject

To the rescue...

To the rescue…

DTI, in the form of DG Lionel October, has since reported to Parliament on the subject of the amended B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice and explained that Minister Davies had admitted that DTI had taken the wrong route with all good intention “to take a narrower view on black management control” but now had apologised for the descision, now reversed, on this aspect of the pointing system. All is reversed, retrospectively as well.

A full report is with our clients with further comments by DTI on the Codes and their application as revised “after the event”.     This analysis of DTI’s presentation will be archived to this website in the course of time.

In the meanwhile, we note that there is useful extra-parliamentary political comment on http://www.polity.org.za/article/da-geordin-hill-lewis-calls-for-debate-in-parliament-over-elitist-bee-codes-2015-05-08

Other articles in this category or as background on this website
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/dti-earns-ire-parliament-bee/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/liquid-fuels-industry-short-transformation/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/one-year-implement-b-bbee-codes/
http://parlyreportsa.co.za/bee/b-bbee-codes-of-good-practice-far-onerous/

Posted in BEE, Facebook and Twitter, Finance, economic, Labour, LinkedIn, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Mineral and Petroleum Resources Bill halted perhaps

Mineral and Petroleum Act extends State rights…

New MPRDA starts with 20% free carry, maybe more….

oil rigThe Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, the legislation that will give the state a right to a 20% free carried interest in all new exploration and production rights in the energy field, has been passed by Parliament before it closed and sent to President Zuma for assent. According to press reports, new minister of mineral resources, Ngoako Ramatlhodi, may have halted the process by request, however, in the light of public sentiment and opposition moves to challenge the Bill’s legality.

Section 3(4) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (MPRDA) currently states that the amount of royalty payable to the State must be determined and levied by the Minister of Finance in terms of an Act of Parliament. This Act, in force, is the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Royalty Act 28 of 2008 but considerable uncertainty always surrounded how this would work and what was actually meant.

Any uncertainty has now been removed and the MPRDA amendments now passed have brought to an end a process which started when the draft Bill was first published for comment in December 2012.

Beneficiation of minerals included

mine dumpThe legislation seeks to “regulate the exploitation of associated minerals” and make provision for the implementation of an approved beneficiation strategy through which strategic minerals can be processed locally for a higher value – the exact definition of the word “beneficiation” yet having to be defined.

Importantly, the new Act will give clear definitions of designated minerals; free carried interest; historic residue stockpiles; a mine gate price; production sharing agreements; security of supply and state participation generally.

Stockpiles and residues affected

The new Act also states that regulations will apply to all historic residue stockpiles both inside and outside their mining areas and residue deposits currently not regulated belong to the owners. Ownership status will remain for two years after the promulgation of the bill.

In addition to the right to a 20% free carried interest on all new projects, ownership by the state can be expanded via an agreed price or production sharing agreements.

The NCOP concurred with Bill on its passage through Parliament and made no changes.

Legal commentators note that the Royalty Act, at present in force, triggers payment in terms of the MPRDA upon “transfer”, this being defined as the consumption, theft, destruction or loss of a mineral resource other than by way of flaring or other liberation into the atmosphere during exploration or production.

The Royalty Act differentiates between refined and unrefined mineral resources as “beneficiation”, this being seen as being important to the economy; incentives being that refined minerals are subject to a slightly lower royalty rate.

Coal and  gas targeted maybe

Nevertheless it appears, commentators note, that in terms of mineral resources coal is being targeted and also zeroed in on is state participation in petroleum licences. Others have pointed to the possible wish of government to have a state owned petroleum entity such as PetroSA to be involved fracking exploration.

Earlier versions of the Bill entitled the State to a free carried interest of 20% and a further participation interest of 30%, with the total State interest capped at 50%; however, the version that Parliament approved removed the reference to a 30% participation interest as well as the limit of 50%, effectively giving the State the right to take over an existing petroleum operation, law firm Bowman Gilfillan explained in a media release earlier this month.

Democratic Alliance (DA) Shadow Minister of Mineral Resources, James Lorimer said in a statement that the Act, “would leave the South African economy in a shambles”, adding that this would lead to people losing their jobs.

The DA has said it has now begun a process to petition President Zuma, in terms of Section 79 of the Constitution, to send this Bill back to the National Assembly for reconsideration,” he said.

Chamber opinion differs

Surprisingly, the Chamber of Mines stated that it “generally welcomed and supported” the approval of the MPRDA Amendment Bill, adding that it believed significant progress had been made in addressing the mining industry’s concerns with the first draft of the Bill, published back in December 2012.

Clearly the mining and petroleum industries particularly gas exploration industries, both of whom have separate equity BEE charters, are still very much at odds on the effects of the promulgation of such an Act, as is DA and the ANC.

Other articles in this category or as background

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/mprda-bill-causes-contention-parliament/

http://parlyreportsa.co.za//bee/major-objections-minerals-and-petroleum-resources-bill/

Posted in BEE, cabinet, Energy, Facebook and Twitter, Fuel,oil,renewables, Justice, constitutional, LinkedIn, Mining, beneficiation, Public utilities, Trade & Industry0 Comments

Justice changing face of small claims courts

Small claims courts doubled…..

legalDeputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development, Mr Andries Nel, in his budget vote speech, gave an update on small claims courts in the country, stating that there were now 277 such courts as distinct from 120 in 1994 mostly in white and urban areas.

He told parliamentarians in the portfolio committee on justice that this meant his department was now more than half way in achieving the objective of having one in each of South Africa’s 393 magisterial districts countrywide.

These courts, he said, eliminate time-consuming adversarial procedures before and during the trial thereby providing speedy and cost effective justice, especially for the poor, he said, and a further nine had been established in June 2013.

Judgements made vastly increased

The number of people enjoying the benefits of access to justice through small claims courts “has increased steadily from a period in 2008 when 95,569 new cases were registered, 47,168 summons were issued resulting in 38,257 trials and 22,397 judgments and 9,405 out of court settlements”, he said.

“Meanwhile, the number of summons issued has increased by more than 21,137 to 68,305 and the number of trials also increased by more than 11,788 to 50,045.  Most significantly, the number of judgments jumped by 62,3% to 36,368 and the number of out of court settlements by 102,9% to 19,087.”

What is also notable, said deputy minister Nel, is the number of commissioners presiding over small claims courts and these have almost doubled in the past four years from 811 in 2009 to 1,546 currently. “However, this comprises 1,314 men and 232 women” and he added that serious attention is being given to the gender imbalance.

Equality court system running well

He also mentioned equality courts dealing with racism, sexism, xenophobia and related intolerance under the Promotion of Equality and Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act, every high Court and magistrates court being designated as an equality court, 619 matters being dealt with for the 2012/13 financial year.

Deputy minister Nel also noted a “dramatic story of transformation” in the sheriff’s profession. In 1994 there were 475 sheriffs. An overwhelming majority of 400 were white men and there were only 40 African men who were located mainly in the so-called homelands

“In 2012 this picture started to change significantly with the appointment of 124 new sheriffs, 64 who were African. A further 120 vacant sheriffs posts will be filled by the end of June this year”, he said.    He thanked the South African Board for Sheriffs under the leadership of Mrs Charmaine Mabuza “for their good work”.

Posted in BEE, Justice, constitutional, Public utilities, Security,police,defence0 Comments


This website is Archival

If you want your publications as they come from Parliament please contact ParlyReportSA directly. All information on this site is posted two weeks after client alert reports sent out.

Upcoming Articles

  1. PIC Bill passage indicates sleight of hand by governing party
  2. Climate legislation Bill links on carbon tax
  3. White Paper sees more Home Affairs meddling

Earlier Editorials

Earlier Stories